2021 WTA Finals

From EverybodyWiki Bios & Wiki


2021 WTA Finals
Date10–17 November
Edition50th (singles) / 45th (doubles)
Draw8S / 8D
Prize money$5,000,000
SurfaceHard / Outdoor
LocationZapopan, Mexico
VenuePanamerican Tennis Center
2019 Champions
Singles
Australia Ashleigh Barty
Doubles
Hungary Tímea Babos / France Kristina Mladenovic
← 2019 · WTA Finals · 2022 →

The 2021 WTA Finals, also known by its sponsored name Akron WTA Finals Guadalajara, is the women's championship tennis tournament run by the Women's Tennis Association (WTA) as part of the 2021 WTA Tour. It currently takes place at the Panamerican Tennis Center in Zapopan, Mexico.

Champions[edit]

Singles[edit]

  • vs.

Doubles[edit]

  • / vs. /

Tournament[edit]

Following the cancellation of the 2020 WTA Finals, the tournament was originally scheduled to take place at the Shenzhen Bay Sports Center in Shenzhen, China but due to travel restrictions owing to the COVID-19 pandemic in mainland China, it was announced on September 13, 2021 that the tournament would move to Guadalajara for the year.[1][2] This is the first time Mexico will host the WTA Finals. The tournament will be the 50th edition of the singles event and the 45th of the doubles competition. It will be contested by eight singles players and eight doubles teams.

Qualifying[edit]

In the singles, point totals are calculated by combining point totals from sixteen tournaments (excluding ITF and WTA 125 tournaments).[3] Of these sixteen tournaments, a player's results from the four Grand Slam events, the four WTA 1000 tournaments with 1,000 points for the winner, and (for the players who played the main draw least 2 such tournaments) the best results from two WTA 1000 tournaments with 900 points maximum must be included.
In the doubles, point totals are calculated by any combination of eleven tournaments throughout the year. Unlike in the singles, this combination does not need to include results from the Grand-Slam or Premier-level tournaments.

Format[edit]

Both the singles and doubles event features eight players/teams in a round robin event, split into two groups of four. Over the first four days of competition, each player/team meets the other three players/teams in her group, with the top two in each group advancing to the semifinals. The first-placed player/team in one group meets the second-placed player/team in the other group, and vice versa. The winners of each semifinal meet in the championship match.

Round robin tie-breaking methods[edit]

The final standings are made using these methods:

  1. Greatest number of [match] wins.
  2. Greatest number of matches played.
  3. Head-to-head results if only two players are tied, or if three players are tied then:
a. If three players each have the same number of wins, a player having played less than all three matches is automatically eliminated and the player advancing to the single elimination competition is the winner of the match-up of the two remaining tied players.
b. Highest percentage of sets won.
c. Highest percentage of games won.

Prize money and points[edit]

The total prize money for the 2021 WTA Finals is US$5,000,000. The tables below are based on the updated draw sheet information.[4]

Stage Prize money Points
Singles Doubles2
Champion RR1 + $1,240,000 RR1 + $250,000 RR + 750
Runner-up RR + $420,000 RR + $80,000 RR + 330
Semifinalist RR + $30,000 RR + $0 RR
Round Robin win per match +$110,000 +$20,000 250
Round Robin loss per match N/A N/A 125
Participation Fee 3 matches = $110,000
2 matches = $90,000
1 match = $70,000
3 matches = $50,000
2 matches = $40,000
1 match = $30,000
N/A
Alternates 2 matches = $80,000
1 match = $60,000
0 matches = $40,000
2 matches = $
1 match = $
0 matches = $
N/A
1 RR means prize money or points won in the round robin round.

* 2 Prize money for doubles is per team.

* An undefeated champion would earn the maximum 1,500 points, and $1,680,000 in singles or $360,000 in doubles.

Qualified players[edit]

Singles[edit]

# Player Points Date qualified
Australia Ashleigh Barty 6,411 withdrew[5]
1 Belarus Aryna Sabalenka 4,768 20 September[6]
2 Czech Republic Barbora Krejčíková 4,518 20 September[6]
3 Czech Republic Karolína Plíšková 4,036 4 October[7]
4 Greece Maria Sakkari 3,341 21 October[8]
5 Poland Iga Świątek 3,226 25 October[9]
6 Spain Garbiñe Muguruza 3,195 25 October[9]
7 Spain Paula Badosa 3,112 25 October[9]
8 Estonia Anett Kontaveit 3,096 31 October[10]

Ashleigh Barty, Aryna Sabalenka and Barbora Krejčíková were announced as the first three qualifiers on September 20.

Ashleigh Barty began 2021 by defeating Garbiñe Muguruza in the final of the Yarra Valley Classic, the Australian's first tour event in 11 months. After a quarterfinal defeat to Karolína Muchová in the quarterfinals of the Australian Open, Barty defended her title at the Miami Open, won Stuttgart, and reached the final in Madrid, losing only to Aryna Sabalenka and Paula Badosa during that time.

Injury forced her to retire from matches at Rome and the French Open, but Barty rebounded by winning Wimbledon, defeating Karolína Plíšková in the final. Barty suffered a shock first-round exit at the Olympics then won the title in Cincinnati. At the US Open, Barty lost to Shelby Rogers in the third round after serving for the match twice.

On October 23, Barty withdrew from the WTA Finals, citing the toll of spending 8 consecutive months away from home.

Aryna Sabalenka qualified at the WTA Finals for the first time in singles.

Aryna Sabalenka carried her dominant form from the end of 2020 into the start of 2021, winning the first tournament of the year in Abu Dhabi. A string of three-set losses followed: to Serena Williams in the Australian Open fourth round, to Muguruza in Doha and Dubai, and to Barty in Miami and the final of Stuttgart. Sabalenka avenged the losses to Barty in the final of Madrid to claim the biggest title of her career. Sabalenka was upset in the third round of the French Open by eventual finalist Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova. She reached her first Grand Slam semifinal at Wimbledon, losing in three sets to Plíšková. Sabalenka lost in the second round of the Olympics then reached the semifinals at Montréal, falling again to Plíšková. Sabalenka reached another semifinal at the US Open but lost to Leylah Fernandez.

After arriving in Indian Wells, Sabalenka tested positive for COVID-19 and was forced to withdraw. She accepted a wild card to play in Moscow and suffered only her second straight set loss of the season in the quarterfinals. Sabalenka will be making her WTA Finals debut.

Barbora Krejčíková won the French Open.

Barbora Krejčíková lost in the second round of her first four tournaments of 2021. In Dubai, she reached the final without dropping a set and lost to Muguruza. After a first round loss to Paula Badosa in Madrid, Krejcikova held match points against Iga Świątek in Rome. She did not lose a match for the next eight weeks, winning her first WTA title in Strasbourg and her first singles Grand Slam at the French Open. At the French Open, Krejčíková saved match points against Maria Sakkari in the semifinals and defeated Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova in three sets in the final. Barty snapped her winning streak in the fourth round of Wimbledon, but the Czech captured her third title of the year in Prague. After a third round loss at the Olympics, Krejčíková notched two victories over Muguruza en route to quarterfinals at Cincinnati and the US Open. Krejčíková is expected to represent the Czech Republic at the Billie Jean King Cup in Prague before making her singles debut at the WTA Finals.

Karolína Plíšková reached the final of the Wimbledon Championships.

Karolína Plíšková was announced as the fourth qualifier on October 4.

Karolína Plíšková had a nightmare start to the year, losing to Karolína Muchová in the third round of the Australian after blowing a 5–0 lead in the second set. Jessica Pegula eliminated her in the early rounds of Doha, Dubai, and Miami. She served for the match against Barty in Stuttgart but lost in three sets. Plíšková made the final of Rome but lost to Iga Świątek, 6–0 6–0. She lost to Sloane Stephens in the second round of the French Open and failed to defend her title in Eastbourne. Entering Wimbledon outside the top 10 for the first time since 2016, Plíšková made the final with a comeback win over Sabalenka in the semifinals. In the championship match, Plíšková lost to Ashleigh Barty in three sets. After losing to Camila Giorgi in the second round of the Olympics, Plíšková made the final of Montréal (losing again to Giorgi), the semifinals of Cincinnati, and the quarterfinals of the US Open (falling to Maria Sakkari). She lost in the third round of Indian Wells to Beatriz Haddad Maia. Plíšková is making her fifth consecutive singles appearance at the WTA Finals.

Maria Sakkari qualified for the first time at the WTA Finals.

On October 21, Maria Sakkari was announced as the fifth qualifier.

Maria Sakkari became the first Greek player to qualify for the WTA Finals. Sakkari had a very strong start to the season reaching consecutive semifinals in Abu Dhabi and Melbourne's Grampians Trophy. A first round loss at the Australian Open was followed by a quarterfinal appearance in Doha. In Miami, she ended Naomi Osaka's 23 match winning streak en route to the semifinal. An average clay season culminated into a run to her first ever grand slam semifinal at the French Open where she lost 7–9 in the third set to the eventual champion Krejčíková, despite having a match point. Prior to that defeat, she had already eliminated Sofia Kenin and Iga Świątek, both of whom contested the 2020 French Open final. She lost in the second round of Wimbledon to Shelby Rogers. At the US Open, Sakkari defeated Petra Kvitová, Bianca Andreescu and Karolína Plíšková to reach her second career grand slam semifinal where she lost to the eventual champion, Emma Raducanu. During the European indoor hardcourt fall season, she reached the final in Ostrava, losing to Anett Kontaveit and semifinal in Moscow where she retired against Ekaterina Alexandrova.

Iga Świątek became the player first born in the 21th century to qualify at the WTA Finals.

On October 25, Iga Świątek, Garbiñe Muguruza, and Paula Badosa were announced as the next three qualifiers.

Iga Świątek became the first player born in the 21st century to qualify for the WTA Finals on October 25. She was the only player this year to have reached the second week of all four grand slam tournaments, although she lost in the fourth round of three of those four majors. Only at the French Open, did she reach the quarterfinals where her title defense was ended by Sakkari. Among the WTA events, she won her second career title in Adelaide in February, defeating Belinda Bencic in the final. After three straight third round losses in Dubai, Miami and Madrid, Świątek won her third WTA singles title in Rome, defeating former champions, Elina Svitolina and Plíšková en route to the title. At the Olympics, she suffered a second round defeat at the hands of Paula Badosa. During the fall season, she made the semifinal in Ostrava, losing to Sakkari again and also lost in fourth round at Indian Wells to Jeļena Ostapenko in a battle between two former Roland Garros champions.

Garbiñe Muguruza qualified at the WTA Finals for the fourth time.

Garbiñe Muguruza qualified for the WTA Finals for the fourth time in her career. She reached the final in just her second event of the season, at Melbourne's Yarra Valley Classic, losing to Barty in the title match. At the Australian Open, she was leading 5-3 in the final set of her fourth round match against the eventual champion, Naomi Osaka, before losing four games in a row and the match. She continued her strong run during the Gulf swing, reaching the final in Doha, where she lost to Petra Kvitová. She won her eighth career title in Dubai, defeating Krejčíková in the final. In Miami, she lost in the third round to Bianca Andreescu. In Charleston, she suffered from an injury during her third round match against Yulia Putintseva, that derailed her clay season as she was forced to withdraw from her home event in Madrid and lost in third and first round of Rome and Roland Garros respectively. A quarterfinal appearance in Berlin on grass was followed by a third round loss to Ons Jabeur at Wimbledon. She also lost in the first round in Montréal to Kateřina Siniaková and third round and fourth round of Cincinnati and US Open respectively to the same player, Krejčíková on both occasions. She won her ninth WTA title in Chicago, defeating Jabeur in the final before losing her opening match in Indian Wells. In Moscow, she reached the quarterfinals, losing to Anett Kontaveit.

Paola Badosa qualified at the WTA Finals for the first time.

Paula Badosa qualified for the WTA Finals for the first time in her career. After a third round defeat in Abu Dhabi and first round loss at the Australian Open, Badosa reached her first semifinal of the season in Lyon, losing to eventual champion Clara Tauson. After suffering some hiccups in St. Petersburg and Miami, Badosa went on a tear during the clay season, defeating Belinda Bencic and World No. 1, Barty to reach the semifinals in Charleston, losing to eventual champion, Veronika Kudermetova. She defeated Krejčíková and Bencic again en route to her first ever WTA 1000 semifinal in Madrid, becoming the first home player to reach the semifinal stage of the tournament. She then went on to win her first career WTA singles title in Belgrade, without dropping a set. At the French Open, she reached her first ever grand slam quarterfinal, losing to Tamara Zidanšek 6–8 in the third set. She also made the fourth round at Wimbledon, losing to Karolína Muchová. She reached the quarterfinals at both the Tokyo Olympics, where she had to retired due to a heatstroke, and Cincinnati, where she also retired due to shoulder pain. That pain made Badosa arrive at the US Open not 100% fit, suffering a shocking second round defeat to Varvara Gracheva. Following a second round loss in Ostrava, Badosa won the second and the biggest title of her career in Indian Wells, with wins over Dayana Yastremska, Coco Gauff, Krejćíková, Angelique Kerber, Ons Jabeur and Victoria Azarenka along the way. She also became the first Spanish woman to win that tournament.

Annet Kontaveit claimed four titles in the year to qualify for the first time at the WTA Finals.

On October 31, Anett Kontaveit was announced as the final qualifier on 31 October, after winning the title in Cluj-Napoca.

Anett Kontaveit qualified for the WTA Finals for the first time in her career, and became the first Estonian player to qualify for the WTA Finals. After an opening round loss to Veronika Kudermetova in Abu Dhabi, Kontaveit reached her first final of the year at the Grampians Trophy in Melbourne, although she and Ann Li were unable to contest the final match. She lost to Shelby Rogers at the Australian Open, and reached the quarterfinals at Doha, losing to Petra Kvitová, and lost in the third round at Dubai to Aryna Sabalenka. She lost in Miami to Elise Mertens, and lost once again to Sabalenka in Stuttgart. After a loss to Sakkari in Madrid, she withdrew from Rome, and lost to Iga Świątek at the French Open. She next reached the final at Eastbourne, losing to Jeļena Ostapenko after defeating No. 7 Bianca Andreescu, before suffering a four match losing streak at Wimbledon, the Olympics, Montréal, and Cincinnati. She began working with Dmitry Tursunov in August, and immediately won her first title since 2017 at Cleveland, defeating Irina-Camelia Begu in the final, before losing once again to Świątek, this time at the US Open. She won the title at Ostrava without dropping a set, defeating Paula Badosa, Belinda Bencic, Kvitová, and Sakkari, before reaching the quarterfinals at Indian Wells, defeating Andreescu for the second time, before falling to Ons Jabeur. She next won back-to-back titles in Moscow and Cluj-Napoca, defeating Ekaterina Alexandrova and Simona Halep in the two finals.


Doubles[edit]

# Players Points Date qualified
1 Czech Republic Barbora Krejčíková
Czech Republic Kateřina Siniaková
6,450 20 September[11]
2 Japan Shuko Aoyama
Japan Ena Shibahara
5,070 20 September[11]
3 Chinese Taipei Hsieh Su-wei
Belgium Elise Mertens
3,892 19 October 2021[12]
4 United States Nicole Melichar-Martinez
Netherlands Demi Schuurs
3,440 19 October 2021[12]
5 Australia Samantha Stosur
China Zhang Shuai
2,911 19 October 2021[12]
inj. United States Coco Gauff
United States Caty McNally
2,770 withdrew[13]
6 Chile Alexa Guarachi
United States Desirae Krawczyk
2,695 28 October 2021[13]
7 Croatia Darija Jurak
Slovenia Andreja Klepač
2,650 28 October 2021[13]
inj. Canada Gabriela Dabrowski
Brazil Luisa Stefani
2,570 withdrew[13]
8 Canada Sharon Fichman
Mexico Giuliana Olmos
2,491 28 October 2021[13]
Krejčíková
Siniaková
Aoyama
Shibahara
Hsieh
Mertens
Melichar-Martinez
Schuurs
Stosur
Zhang
Guarachi
Krawczyk
Jurak
Klepač
Fichman
Olmos

Groupings[edit]

Singles[edit]

The singles draw of the 2021 edition of the Year–end Championships will feature three major champions and one major finalist. The competitors were divided into two groups.[14] [15]

Group Chichén Itzá
Belarus Aryna Sabalenka [1]
Greece Maria Sakkari [4]
Poland Iga Świątek [5]
Spain Paula Badosa [7]

Group Teotihuacán
Czech Republic Barbora Krejčíková [2]
Czech Republic Karolína Plíšková [3]
Spain Garbiñe Muguruza [6]
Estonia Anett Kontaveit [8]

Doubles[edit]

The doubles draw of the 2021 edition of the Year–end Championships will feature two number-ones, three major champions and one major finalist team. The pairs were divided into two groups.[14]

Group El Tajín
Czech Republic Barbora Krejčíková [1]
Czech Republic Kateřina Siniaková [1]
Chinese Taipei Hsieh Su-wei [3]
Belgium Elise Mertens [3]
Chile Alexa Guarachi [6]
United States Desirae Krawczyk [6]
Canada Sharon Fichman [8]
Mexico Giuliana Olmos [8]

Group Tenochtitlán
Japan Shuko Aoyama [2]
Japan Ena Shibahara [2]
United States Nicole Melichar-Martinez [4]
Netherlands Demi Schuurs [4]
Australia Samantha Stosur [5]
China Zhang Shuai [5]
Croatia Darija Jurak [7]
Slovenia Andreja Klepač [7]

Points breakdown[edit]

Updated as of 8 November 2021.

Singles[edit]

  Player qualified for the WTA Finals.[16]
  Player withdrew.
Rank Player Grand Slam WTA 1000 Best other Total
points
Tourn Titles
Mandatory Best two
AUS FRA WIM USO MI MA IW[lower-alpha 1] BE[lower-alpha 2] 1 2 1 2 3 4 5 6
Australia Ashleigh Barty QF
430
R64
70
W
2000
R32
130
W
1000
F
650
A
0
W
900
QF
190
W
470
W
470
QF
100
R16
1
6,411 12 5
1 Belarus Aryna Sabalenka R16
240
R32
130
SF
780
SF
780
QF
215
W
1000
R16
1
R16
1
SF
350
QF
190
W
470
F
305
R16
105
QF
100
QF
100
R32
1
4,768 16 2
2 Czech Republic Barbora Krejčíková R64
70
W
2000
R16
240
QF
430
R64
35
R64
10
R16
120
Q2
13
F
585
QF
190
W
280
W
280
R16
105
QF
100
R16
30
R32
30
4,518 16 3
3 Czech Republic Karolína Plíšková R32
130
R64
70
F
1300
QF
430
R32
65
R32
65
R32
65
R16
1
F
585
F
585
SF
350
R16
105
QF
100
QF
100
R16
55
R32
30
4,036 17 0
4 Greece Maria Sakkari R128
10
SF
780
R64
70
SF
780
SF
390
R16
120
R64
10
R64
1
R16
105
R32
60
F
305
SF
185
SF
185
SF
185
QF
100
R16
55
3,341 17 0
5 Poland Iga Świątek R16
240
QF
430
R16
240
R16
240
R32
65
R16
120
R16
120
W
900
R16
105
W
470
SF
185
R16
55
R16
55
R32
1
3,226 14 2
6 Spain Garbiñe Muguruza R16
240
R128
10
R32
130
R16
240
R16
120
A
0
R64
10
R16
55
W
900
R16
105
W
470
F
305
F
305
R16
105
QF
100
QF
100
3,195 17 2
7 Spain Paula Badosa R128
10
QF
430
R16
240
R64
70
R64
35
SF
390
W
1000
R32
1
QF
190
R32
60
W
280
SF
185
SF
110
R16
55
R16
55
R32
1
3,112 16 2
8 Estonia Anett Kontaveit R32
130
R32
130
R128
10
R32
130
QF
100
R32
65
QF
215
QF
100
R16
105
R64
1
W
470
W
470
F
305
F
305
W
280
W
280
3,096 20 4
Alternates
Tunisia Ons Jabeur R32
130
R16
240
QF
430
R32
130
R16
120
R16
120
SF
390
R16
55
QF
190
R16
105
F
305
W
280
SF
185
F
180
R16
105
R16
55
3,020 19 1
Japan Naomi Osaka W
2000
R64
70
A
0
R32
130
QF
215
R32
65
A
0
R16
105
R32
1
SF
185
2,771 8 1
Russia Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova R128
10
F
1300
R32
130
R16
240
R32
1
SF
390
R32
65
R32
1
R32
60
R64
1
QF
100
R16
55
R16
55
R16
55
R16
55
R16
30
2,548 18 0
Ukraine Elina Svitolina R16
240
R32
130
R64
70
QF
430
SF
390
R64
10
R16
120
R16
55
QF
190
R32
1
W
280
SF
185
QF
100
QF
100
QF
100
QF
100
2,501 19 1
9 United States Jessica Pegula QF
430
R32
130
R64
70
R32
130
R16
120
R16
120
QF
215
R16
30
SF
350
QF
190
SF
210
QF
190
R16
105
QF
100
R16
55
R16
55
2,500 18 0
10 Belgium Elise Mertens R16
240
R32
130
R32
130
R16
240
R16
120
QF
215
R64
10
R32
1
SF
350
R32
60
W
470
SF
185
F
180
QF
60
R16
55
R64
1
2,447 19 1
  1. The Indian Wells Masters was rescheduled to October due to the COVID-19 pandemic.[17]
  2. The China Open was cancelled due to travel restrictions related to the COVID-19 pandemic in mainland China.[18]

Doubles[edit]

  Team qualified for the WTA Finals.[19]
  Team withdrew due to injury.
Rank Team Points Total
points
Tourn Titles
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
1 Czech Republic Barbora Krejčíková
Czech Republic Kateřina Siniaková
W
2000
F
1300
W
1000
W
470
QF
430
SF
350
QF
215
QF
190
QF
190
SF
185
R16
120
6,450 12 3
2 Japan Shuko Aoyama
Japan Ena Shibahara
W
1000
SF
780
W
470
W
470
W
470
QF
430
SF
390
SF
350
W
280
R16
240
QF
190
5,070 19 5
3 Chinese Taipei Hsieh Su-wei
Belgium Elise Mertens
W
2000
W
1000
QF
430
R16
240
SF
110
QF
100
R16
10
R16
1
R16
1
3,892 9 2
4 United States Nicole Melichar-Martinez
Netherlands Demi Schuurs
SF
780
W
470
W
470
F
305
F
305
R16
240
QF
190
QF
190
SF
185
SF
185
R16
120
3,440 17 2
5 Australia Samantha Stosur
China Zhang Shuai
W
2000
W
900
R64
10
R32
1
2,911 4 2
United States Coco Gauff
United States Caty McNally
F
1300
QF
430
W
280
R16
240
QF
215
R16
105
QF
100
QF
100
2,770 8 1
6 Chile Alexa Guarachi
United States Desirae Krawczyk
SF
780
W
470
W
280
R16
240
QF
190
SF
185
R16
120
R16
120
SF
110
QF
100
QF
100
2,695 20 2
7 Croatia Darija Jurak
Slovenia Andreja Klepač
F
585
W
470
QF
430
W
280
R16
240
SF
185
F
180
R16
105
R16
105
QF
60
R32
10
2,650 15 2
Canada Gabriela Dabrowski
Brazil Luisa Stefani
W
900
SF
780
F
585
F
305
2,570 4 1
8 Canada Sharon Fichman
Mexico Giuliana Olmos
W
900
QF
430
R16
240
R16
240
SF
185
R16
120
R16
120
QF
100
QF
100
R16
55
R32
1
2,491 12 1
Alternates
9 Ukraine Nadiia Kichenok
Romania Raluca Olaru
W
470
F
305
W
280
R16
240
R16
240
SF
185
F
180
R32
130
R16
120
R16
105
R16
55
2,310 16 2
10 Czech Republic Marie Bouzková
Czech Republic Lucie Hradecká
QF
430
QF
430
F
305
W
280
W
280
QF
215
SF
185
QF
60
R16
55
R16
1
R32
1
2,242 11 2

Player head-to-head[edit]

Below are the head-to-head records as they approached the tournament.[11]

Singles[edit]

  Sabalenka Krejčíková  Plíšková    Sakkari     Świątek   Muguruza   Badosa    Kontaveit  Overall YTD W–L
1 Belarus Aryna Sabalenka 2–0 2–2 4–1 0–0 1–2 0–1 4–0 13–6 44–16
2 Czech Republic Barbora Krejčíková 0–2 0–2 3–0 0–2 2–1 0–2 0–0 5–9 45–16
3 Czech Republic Karolína Plíšková 2–2 2–0 1–2 0–1 8–2 2–0 3–0 18–7 35–18
4 Greece Maria Sakkari 1–4 0–3 2–1 2–0 1–1 0–0 6–5 12–14 36–18
5 Poland Iga Świątek 0–0 2–0 1–0 0–2 0–1 0–1 2–2 5–6 35–13
6 Spain Garbiñe Muguruza 2–1 1–2 2–8 1–1 1–0 0–0 2–2 9–14 38–16
7 Spain Paula Badosa 1–0 2–0 0–2 0–0 1–0 0–0 0–1 4–3 41–15
8 Estonia Anett Kontaveit 0–4 0–0 0–3 5–6 2–2 2–2 1–0 10–17 45–15

Doubles[edit]

  Krejčíková
Siniaková
Aoyama
Shibahara
Hsieh
 Mertens 
 Melichar 
Schuurs
  Stosur  
Zhang
Guarachi
Krawczyk
Jurak
  Klepač  
Fichman
Olmos
Overall YTD
1 Czech Republic Barbora Krejčíková
Czech Republic Kateřina Siniaková
0–0 0–0 0–0 0–2 0–0 0–0 1–0 1–2 40–11
2 Japan Shuko Aoyama
Japan Ena Shibahara
0–0 0–2 2–1 0–1 0–1 0–1 1–2 3–8 39–16
3 Chinese Taipei Hsieh Su-wei
Belgium Elise Mertens
0–0 2–0 0–0 0–0 0–0 0–0 0–1 2–1 20–7
4 United States Nicole Melichar-Martinez
Netherlands Demi Schuurs
0–0 1–2 0–0 0–1 0–0 0–0 0–0 1–3 30–16
5 Australia Samantha Stosur
China Zhang Shuai
2–0 1–0 0–0 1–0 1–0 0–0 0–0 5–0 11–2
6 Chile Alexa Guarachi
United States Desirae Krawczyk
0–0 1–0 0–0 0–0 0–1 0–1 0–0 1–2 25–20
7 Croatia Darija Jurak
Slovenia Andreja Klepač
0–0 1–0 0–0 0–0 0–0 1–0 0–0 2–0 27–13
8 Canada Sharon Fichman
Mexico Giuliana Olmos
0–1 2–1 1–0 0–0 0–0 0–0 0–0 2–2 22–11

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. "2021 WTA Finals to be held in Zapopan, Mexico" (Press release). Women's Tennis Association. 13 September 2021. Retrieved 20 September 2021.
  2. Carroll, Rory (20 September 2021). "Barty among first three qualifiers for WTA Finals". Reuters. Retrieved 20 September 2021.
  3. "2021 WTA Official Rulebook (page 85)" (PDF). WTA. Retrieved 11 January 2021.
  4. "WTA Finals 2021: Schedule, draws, prize money and everything you need to know". Women's Tennis Association. 9 November 2021. Retrieved 2021-11-10. Unknown parameter |url-status= ignored (help)
  5. "Barty pulls out of WTA Finals to focus on Australian Open preparations". Reuters. 23 October 2021.
  6. 6.0 6.1 "First qualifiers announced for 2021 WTA Finals". WTA. 20 September 2021.
  7. "Karolina Pliskova secures qualification for 2021 Akron WTA Finals Guadalajara". WTA. 4 October 2021.
  8. "Maria Sakkari earns historic qualification for 2021 Akron WTA Finals Guadalajara". WTA. 22 October 2021.
  9. 9.0 9.1 9.2 "Swiatek, Muguruza and Badosa secure qualification for 2021 Akron WTA Finals Guadalajara". WTA. 25 October 2021.
  10. "Anett Kontaveit secures qualification for 2021 Akron WTA Finals Guadalajara". WTA. 31 October 2021.
  11. 11.0 11.1 11.2 "First qualifiers announced for 2021 WTA Finals". Women's Tennis Association. 20 September 2021. Retrieved 2021-11-11. Unknown parameter |url-status= ignored (help)
  12. 12.0 12.1 12.2 "Three doubles teams qualify for 2021 WTA Finals | Sports-Games". Devdiscourse. 19 October 2021. Retrieved 2021-11-11. Unknown parameter |url-status= ignored (help)
  13. 13.0 13.1 13.2 13.3 13.4 "Doubles field set for 2021 Akron WTA Finals Guadalajara". Women's Tennis Association. 28 October 2021. Retrieved 2021-11-11. Unknown parameter |url-status= ignored (help)
  14. 14.0 14.1 "WTA Finals 2021 draw: Groups revealed at Opening Gala in Guadalajara". Women's Tennis Association. 10 November 2021. Retrieved 2021-11-11. Unknown parameter |url-status= ignored (help)
  15. "2021 WTA Finals - Singles Draw". Women's Tennis Association. Retrieved 2021-11-13. Unknown parameter |url-status= ignored (help)
  16. "Porsche Race Singles". WTA. Retrieved 18 January 2021.
  17. "BNP Paribas Open tennis tournament rescheduled for October 2021 at Indian Wells". The Desert Sun. 20 May 2021. Retrieved 21 May 2021.
  18. "WTA announces 2021 calendar update". WTA. 1 July 2021. Retrieved 2 July 2021.
  19. "Porsche Race Doubles". WTA. Retrieved 18 January 2021.

External links[edit]


This article "2021 WTA Finals" is from Wikipedia. The list of its authors can be seen in its historical and/or the page Edithistory:2021 WTA Finals. Articles copied from Draft Namespace on Wikipedia could be seen on the Draft Namespace of Wikipedia and not main one.