Welcome to EverybodyWiki 😃 ! Nuvola apps kgpg.png Log in or ➕👤 create an account to improve, watchlist or create an article like a 🏭 company page or a 👨👩 bio (yours ?)...

Abe Gray

From EverybodyWiki Bios & Wiki

Abe Gray
Michael Mayell and Abe Gray on Stage in 2019 (cropped).jpg File:Michael_Mayell_and_Abe_Gray_on_Stage_in_2019_(cropped).jpg
Mayell (left) and Gray speaking at the University of Canterbury, October 2019.
Born (1982-03-16) 16 March 1982 (age 39)
Minneapolis, Minnesota, United States
🏳️ Nationality
🎓 Alma materUniversity of Minnesota[1]
University of Otago
💼 Occupation
Whakamana Cannabis Museum
🏛️ Political partyThe Opportunities Party, formerly Aotearoa Legalise Cannabis Party

Abe Gray (born 16 March 1982) is a New Zealand cannabis activist, politician and founder of the Whakamana Cannabis Museum, New Zealand's first and only cannabis museum. Gray was a University of Otago lecturer and tutor for over a decade before founding the museum.[2][3]

Gray has been a high-profile cannabis activist and protester for almost two decades,[4] and is known as New Zealand's 'Gandalf of Weed'.[5]

Biography[edit]

Early life[edit]

Gray grew up in Minneapolis, Minnesota and attended South High School.[6] Gray ran for student president of his high school on a stoner ticket, unsuccessfully, but blames low turnout and students skipping assembly for it. As a teenager, Gray attempted to find new connections to get access to cannabis, so Gray started working at a local head shop. This soon inspired Gray's passion for cannabis, as he would spend his time at the store consuming books on the history and cultivation of cannabis.

Gray started growing weed in his closet, taking classes on plant propagation, learning to clone and tell the difference between strains.

Gray says following the enactment of the Patriot Act “cannabis-smoking hippies were as legitimate a target for the Patriot Act police state as minorities”.[7]

Gray read several articles, in the magazines High Times and Cannabis Culture, about New Zealand's newly elected Green MP Nándor Tánczos and how New Zealand was on the precipice of legalising cannabis. Gray told himself "I'm gonna go to NZ, enrol in a uni that teaches botany, and I’m gonna learn to grow the dankest weed."

Moving to New Zealand and university days[edit]

Gray arrived in New Zealand five days after the 2002 New Zealand general election, where the Green Party were no longer in government, meaning cannabis legislation wasn't an option for the foreseeable future. After the Green's failure to make advances in cannabis policy at the 2002 election, Gray joined the Legalise Cannabis Party.[8]

Gray earned a master's degree in Botany from the University of Otago,[9] but was too paranoid about his immigration status to grow or sell any cannabis during his first three years in New Zealand. Despite this, Gray did smoke cannabis and take part in cannabis protests, including two occasions where he led a group who hot-boxed the Dunedin police station at the annual J Day protest march in 2003 and 2004. These experiences helped him realise the strength in numbers and the power of protest.

Abe was involved in a University of Otago club of cannabis enthusiasts, Otago NORML, and was its president for many years.[10] Otago NORML started gathering on the University of Otago Union Lawn at 4:20pm every Friday to smoke together. The club soon became one of the largest on campus, but the university was displeased. Campus security guards tried to forcefully move the group away, causing a backlash among members that made local headlines. The weekly smoke sessions became twice-weekly. The club held lectures, debates, and an entire cannabis awareness week on campus. This caused Gray to become the target of a six-month investigation by the police Special Tactics Group.

Gray was arrested in 2008 by a group of uniformed officers while giving a presentation about cannabis at the university's annual clubs day. Gray was warned police officers were heading his way, but was confident they were not after him so he kept a bag of cannabis in his pocket. But it was for him. Gray was dragged to a police car. An angry crowd followed them and laid down in front of the police cars, and five additional undercover police officers came out to attempt to control the situation.

Green MP Metiria Turei was at another stall and yelled at the officers, demanding identification, and said the police response was over the top.[11] Gray was charged with possession of a pipe, one gram of cannabis and resisting arrest,[12] but was discharged without conviction. The court disclosure documents showed all of his text messages and bank records covering the last six months.

These protests and encounters with the police are covered in 2015 New Zealand documentary Druglawed,[13] which documents the history of cannabis prohibition in the US and New Zealand, outlining political and economic reasons for its prohibition. It argues New Zealand mirrors the USA's war on drugs, and prohibition is failing.[14]

Political life and Cannabis Museum[edit]

Gray stood as a list candidate for the Aotearoa Legalise Cannabis Party in the 2011 New Zealand general election, and served as their deputy leader.[15][16] Though inspired by Nándor Tánczos, Gray became disillusioned by what he saw as the Green Party's "political posturing" on cannabis law reform. He stuck with the Aotearoa Legalise Cannabis Party.[17]

Gray participated in the 2011 "Occupy Dunedin" protest, as part of a worldwide movement supporting Occupy Wall Street. There were more than 100 protesters and 30 tents at the Octagon.[18]

In 2013, Gray opened the Whakamana Cannabis Museum from a Dunedin flat.[19][20] Gray and other activists hoped to turn Dunedin into a 'cannabis capital'.[21] The museum tells the history of cannabis laws and protests, the biology of the plant, and different ways to consume it. The museum was listed as a guest room on AirBnB, with "awesome queen bed with reading lamps, a bit of closet space, plenty of electricity outlets and a few houseplants," listed on the promotional blurb.[22]

In 2014, Gray contested Dunedin North for the Aotearoa Legalise Cannabis Party, coming fifth.

In 2014, the Whakamana Cannabis Museum hosted the Aotearoa Legalise Cannabis Party AGM and Gray was elected president of the party. Gray wanted to demonstrate cannabis was a political winner and entice major parties into stealing the policy.

In 2016, Gray ran in the 2016 Dunedin mayoral election,[1][23] coming tenth with 734 votes.

Gray ran for the Aotearoa Legalise Cannabis Party in the 2017 Mount Albert by-election, running against Jacinda Ardern and Geoff Simmons.[24][25]

Later in 2017, Gray left his role as president of the Aotearoa Legalise Cannabis Party and ran for The Opportunities Party in Dunedin North,[26][27][28][29] partly due to a dissatisfied member base which wanted him gone, and partly because he was impressed by TOP's drug reform policy. Gray called on other ACLP members to transition to TOP.[30] Late in the 2017 election, the Greens went all-in promoting their cannabis legalisation policy, ultimately leading to the 2020 New Zealand cannabis referendum, which Gray is convinced would not have happened without TOP’s presence.

In 2018, the museum moved to a high-profile cafe location in Dunedin's main street, Princes Street, and the museum then included a cafe and VIP facilities.[31] Gray appointed himself the curator and lead researcher. Members could pay a fee of $4.20 a week to access a clubroom to smoke in, complete with comfy couches, lava lamps and retro video game consoles. Club members at the museum could bring cannabis to smoke, and could exchange and sell to each other, but Gray was never involved in any sales. While the museum sold cannabis-related paraphernalia, there was no cannabis for sale. The museum had a cafe, High Tide, which sold coffees for $4.20 – a nod to cannabis culture.[32] Comedian Guy Williams visited the museum and documented his visit for a segment on the comedy show Jono and Ben.[33][34] A cannabis-keen Bitcoin millionaire donated $5000 to provide half-price drinks and food to pensioners.[35] It was later revealed that the person who claimed to be the landlord of the museum's building didn't actually own it, but Gray then managed to lease the building himself off the true owner.[36]

Gray co-founded pro-cannabis group Start The Conversation in 2013, ultimately attracting the support of Helen Kelly (in 2016),[37] Marc Willers, and Lucy Lawless (in 2018).[38] Start The Conversation received a notice from Facebook saying its ad account status had been disabled. Gray alleges the group is a victim of Facebook's strict anti-cannabis stance, and said informed discussion was crucial in the lead-up to a referendum on cannabis.[39]

In 2018, when flying from Sydney to Christchurch, airport customs questioned Gray on wearing a cannabis T-shirt promoting the museum. The official kept probing him about the T-shirt and told him he should not wear it – especially when travelling to New Zealand. Gray said "I felt violated ... to have a pimple-faced Customs kid grilling me about my f...ing T-shirt, it was like a slap in the face coming back to the country."[40]

After University of Otago proctor Dave Scott, a former police officer, entered at least four student flats and removed drug-taking equipment, Gray sought legal advice for a possible private prosecution. Hundreds signed a petition for Scott to resign. Gray said a cannabis supporter known to him had pledged $25,000 to take a private prosecution.[41][42] The Whakamana Cannabis Museum also offered to sponsor brand new water pipes for the flats.[43][44]

In 2019, Whakamana Cannabis Museum moved to a spot in Christchurch's Manchester St.[45] The museum's Christchurch location was in Shand's Emporium, Christchurch's oldest commercial building.[46]

In 2019, Gray and Cookie Time founder Michael Mayell launched a PledgeMe crowdfunder, hoping to raise $2 million to publicly fund an expansion of the cannabis museum in Christchurch.[47] They raised $214,616 from 299 donations.[48][49] They were planning on calling it Whakamana, the New Zealand Institute of Cannabis Education, Research and Development with plans of an expanded version of Gray's Dunedin museum, including a hemp food cafe and restaurant, hemp emporium and an alcohol-free plant shot bar.[50] Gray said recent scaremongering from the “anti-cannabis brigade” in response to those plans made it clearer that having somewhere like Whakamana presenting facts was even more critical in the lead up to the 2020 referendum and beyond.[51]

The Christchurch location closed down in 2020, after Gray had to move to Wellington for his wife's job. A planned pop-up in Wellington timed to coincide with the 2020 referendum never materialised due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Gray ran for The Opportunities Party in Wellington Central in the 2020 New Zealand general election,[52][53][54] coming fourth with 1,031 votes,[55] and led the Yes We Cannabis campaign as a spinoff of Start The Conversation.[56] Gray also served as The Opportunities Party's 2020 cannabis spokesperson, and was on a mission to be "the first Minister of Cannabis".[57] Gray says he supported the Cannabis Legalisation and Control Bill,[58] and believes it was important to include edibles in the legislation to give people an alternative to smoking or vaping.[59] Gray believes a regionalised model to cannabis is worth exploring.[60]

As of 2021, Gray now lives in Auckland, and is currently looking for a retail space to open the fourth iteration of the museum.

The 2020 New Zealand cannabis referendum didn't pass but regardless of the outcome, Gray plans to get the museum back up and running again in Auckland.[5][61]

Views[edit]

Gray said he believes what stops marijuana law reform is that it's a direct challenge to existing power structures. Drug companies are reluctant, on financial grounds, to have laws that allow people to grow "medicine" in their back yards and police would be hesitant to water down laws that give them the power to search and prosecute hundreds of thousands of Kiwis, he says. "All of these barriers exist to change. Even if it seems obvious it should be done for the good of human rights." Gray believes public pressure for change will become more vocal as other countries, particularly Australia, adopt laws allowing marijuana for medical reasons.[62]

In 2016, following Rebecca Reider being allowed to travel through the customs at Auckland Airport with medicinal cannabis, Gray said Reider's success would open the way for others to bring in cannabis.[63]

Gray was skeptical that CBD gel being tested on patients in New Zealand with a specific form of epilepsy would change the mind of the Minister of Health. "The current approach of the NZ Ministry of Health tends to ignore the evidence from people who have successfully used various cannabis products." He added, "My experience indicates that the real problem is not the lack of evidence, but the lack of resources to collect, assess and circulate that evidence in a transparent way and a lack of education of doctors and other medical experts on how and why cannabinoids work and how they can most effectively be used."[64]

In 2018, Gray said New Zealand risks being "completely left behind" if it continues to "drag its heels" regarding ending prohibition of cannabis. He says New Zealand could benefit from an annual $1 billion medicinal cannabis market and an annual $5 billion recreational market if cannabis is legalised. New Zealand is "already missing the boat on getting involved at the ground level with this globally important agricultural commodity". University of Otago's Dr Joseph Boden agrees, saying the data coming out of the American states where cannabis has been legalised has shown that there's a "huge tax take".[65]

Gray stated he agrees that CBD-only products are not terribly effective. “CBD on its own without any THC is the most ineffective form of medicinal cannabis but the most politically accepted, because it’s a single compound that can be easily synthesised and has no psychoactive components. When it comes to medicinal use you need the full spectrum of components to work effectively.”[66]

Gray predicted by 2030 that cannabis will "be as common as it is now, but it won't be as hidden away". Gray expects some cities to push back on cannabis legislation, but believed Christchurch would embrace it. Cannabis cafes would be around, Gray added, but he didn't think they'd be as common as bars.[67]

In 2020, following at least 10 incidents of gang members robbing and assaulting people using Discord to buy drugs, Gray says the issue is an example of harm caused by prohibition of cannabis. "No-one is going to meet someone in an alleyway to buy anything if it is available on the legal market. You can't issue consumer complaints on the black market either ... The other thing with Discord is that it is not how your mum or grandma used to buy cannabis and certainly not me. For young people, they are going to find a way, so we really have to decouple cannabis from the black market to keep them safe."[68]

Personal life[edit]

Gray has lived in New Zealand since 2002 and now lives in Auckland. Gray has a Masters in Botany from University of Otago. Gray has two children and his wife is a surgeon in training.[2]

Electoral history[edit]

2014 general election: Dunedin North[edit]

2014 general election: Dunedin North[69]
Notes:

Blue background denotes the winner of the electorate vote.
Pink background denotes a candidate elected from their party list.
Yellow background denotes an electorate win by a list member, or other incumbent.
A Green tickY or Red XN denotes status of any incumbent, win or lose respectively.

Party Candidate Votes % ±% Party votes % ±%
Labour Green tickY David Clark 16,315 47.40 +3.15 11,147 31.82 −1.98
National Michael Woodhouse 10,398 30.21 −2.14 11,302 32.26 −0.13
Green Metiria Turei 5,978 17.37 −2.14 8,035 22.94 −0.45
Conservative Jonathan Daley 621 1.80 +1.80 956 2.73 +1.38
Legalise Cannabis Abe Gray 580 1.69 +0.33 172 0.49 −0.08
Internet Rob Stewart 255 0.74 +0.74
Independent Adrian Daegal Graamans 106 0.31 +0.31
Democrats Miriam Mowat 159 0.31 −0.36 37 0.11 −0.10
Independent Stan Lusby 62 0.18 +0.18
NZ First   2,364 6.75 +1.06
Internet Mana   603 1.72 +1.12[lower-alpha 1]
Māori   124 0.35 −0.07
ACT   111 0.32 −0.41
United Future   86 0.25 −0.29
Ban 1080   60 0.17 +0.17
Civilian   27 0.08 +0.08
Independent Coalition   7 0.02 +0.02
Focus   1 0.00 +0.00
Informal votes 216 99
Total Valid votes 34,636 35,131
Turnout 35,230 79.88 +11.50
Labour hold Majority 5,917 17.19 +5.29

2016 Dunedin mayoral election[edit]

Candidate Affiliation First Preference Last Iteration
Votes % +/- Votes %
Dave Cull Independent 10,816 27.1 −22.2 17,441 59.4
Lee Vandervis Independent 7,063 17.7 +2.5 11,938 40.6
Barry Timmings 5,613 14.0
Andrew Whiley 4,647 11.6 +4.4
Aaron Hawkins Green Dunedin 3,108 7.7 +0.2
Jim O'Malley 2,501 6.2
Conrad Stedman Independent 2,086 5.2
Rachel Elder 1,734 4.3
Scout Barbour-Evans 945 2.3
Abe Gray 734 1.8
Athold Bayne Stand up for Dunedin 612 1.5
Informal votes N/A [70]
Turnout 39,859

2017 Mount Albert by-election[edit]

The following table shows the final results:[71]

2017 Mount Albert by-election

Notes: Blue background denotes the winner of the by-election.
Pink background denotes a candidate elected from their party list prior to the by-election.
Yellow background denotes the winner of the by-election, who was a list MP prior to the by-election.
A Green tickY or Red XN denotes status of any incumbent, win or lose respectively.

Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Labour Jacinda Ardern 10,495 76.89
Green Julie Anne Genter 1,564 11.45
Opportunities Geoff Simmons 623 4.56
People's Party Vin Tomar 218 1.59
Socialist Aotearoa Joe Carolan 189 1.38
Independent Penny Bright 139 1.01
Legalise Cannabis Abe Gray 97 0.71
Independent Adam Amos 81 0.59
Independent Dale Arthur 54 0.39
Human Rights Anthony Van den Heuvel 34 0.24
Independent Peter Wakeman 30 0.21
Not A Party Simon Smythe 19 0.13
Communist League Patrick Brown 16 0.11
Informal votes 90 0.65
Total Valid votes 13,649 30.00
Labour hold Majority 8,931 65.43

2017 general election: Dunedin North[edit]

2017 general election: Dunedin North[72]
Notes:

Blue background denotes the winner of the electorate vote.
Pink background denotes a candidate elected from their party list.
Yellow background denotes an electorate win by a list member, or other incumbent.
A Green tickY or Red XN denotes status of any incumbent, win or lose respectively.

Party Candidate Votes % ±% Party votes % ±%
Labour Green tickY David Clark 21,259 57.48 +10.08 17,808 47.63 +15.81
National Michael Woodhouse 9,505 25.70 −4.51 10,382 27.77 −4.49
Green Niki Bould 3,053 8.25 −9.12 5,110 13.67 −9.27
Opportunities Abe Gray 1,645 4.45 1,535 4.11
NZ First Warren Voight 1,069 2.89 1,899 5.08 +1.67
ACT Sam Purchas 150 0.40 157 0.41 +0.09
Independent Adrian Daegal Graamans 71 0.19 −0.12
Independent Stan Lusby 38 0.01 −0.17
Māori   108 0.29 −0.06
Legalise Cannabis   89 0.24 −0.25
Conservative   60 0.16 −2.57
Ban 1080   55 0.15 −0.02
United Future   20 0.08 −0.17
People's Party   17 0.05
Democrats   15 0.04 −0.07
Outdoors   14 0.04
Mana   11 0.03
Internet   10 0.03
Informal votes 195 86
Total Valid votes 36,985 37,385
Labour hold Majority 11,754 31.78 +11.92

2020 general election: Wellington Central[edit]

2020 general election: Wellington Central[73]
Notes:

Blue background denotes the winner of the electorate vote.
Pink background denotes a candidate elected from their party list.
Yellow background denotes an electorate win by a list member, or other incumbent.
A Green tickY or Red XN denotes status of any incumbent, win or lose respectively.

Party Candidate Votes % ±% Party votes % ±%
Labour Green tickY Grant Robertson 27,366 57.26 +8 20,876 43.4 +5.11
National Nicola Willis 8,488 17.76 −7.99 6,937 30.3 −0.23
Green James Shaw 8,381 17.54 +2.15 14,587 30.33 +8.99
Opportunities Abe Gray 1,031 2.16 —4.66 1,790 3.72 —2.17
ACT Brooke van Velden 865 1.81 +1.5 2,339 4.86 +4.09
Legalise Cannabis Michael George Appleby 401 0.84 132 0.27 +0.7
Independent Jesse Richardson 385 0.81
New Conservative Liam Richfield 401 0.45 204 0.42 +0.35
Advance NZ Rose Greally 108 0.23 103 0.21
ONE Gina Sunderland 84 0.18 56 0.12
Outdoors Bruce Robert 76 0.16 27 0.06 +0.03
NZ First   537 1.11 —1.15
Māori   255 0.53 -0.01
Sustainable NZ   32 0.07
Social Credit   18 0.04
TEA   12 0.02
Vision NZ   8 0.01
Heartland   1 0.00
Informal votes 47,401 47,914
Total Valid votes 47,787 48,090
Turnout 48,090 88.97[74] +2.41
Labour hold Majority 18,878 39.5 +15.99

See also[edit]


Other articles of the topic Cannabis : Moxie (cannabis company), Ma, The Uplifters’ Prima, Poke A Bowl, Flower Company Inc., Have a Heart Compassion Care

Other articles of the topic New Zealand : Highway 61 Motorcycle Club, Che Wilson (politician), WWE SmackDown Road to WrestleMania 22 Tour, Stephen Berry, McDonald's Australia, Triodent, Ltd., List of Australasian boxing champions
Some use of "" in your query was not closed by a matching "".Some use of "" in your query was not closed by a matching "".

  • Aotearoa Legalise Cannabis Party
  • Cannabis in New Zealand
  • NORML New Zealand
  • Otago NORML
  • The Opportunities Party
  • Whakamana Cannabis Museum

References[edit]

  1. 1.0 1.1 "Mayoral Profile: Abe Gray | Otago Daily Times Online News". odt.co.nz. Retrieved 22 February 2021.
  2. 2.0 2.1 "Abe Gray | Wellington Central". TOP. Retrieved 22 February 2021.
  3. "Debate audience turns to Shakespeare". Politik. Retrieved 22 February 2021.
  4. "Yes or No: New Zealanders Head to the Polls to Legalize Cannabis". cannabisnow.com. Retrieved 22 February 2021.
  5. 5.0 5.1 "How Abe Gray became New Zealand's 'Gandalf of Weed'". Stuff.co.nz. Retrieved 22 February 2021.
  6. O'Connor, Anne (October 18, 1999). "Candidates face busy debate schedule". Star Tribune. pp. B1, B3. Retrieved February 25, 2021 – via Newspapers.com.
  7. "The Road Ahead: 'Cannabis users aren't degenerates - they're normal'". NZ Herald. Retrieved 22 February 2021.
  8. "Three - Country Restricted". newshub.co.nz. Retrieved 22 February 2021.
  9. "Election 2020: Who are the candidates for the Wellington Central electorate?". Stuff.co.nz. Retrieved 22 February 2021.
  10. "Students to storm Campus Watch | Otago Daily Times Online News". odt.co.nz. Retrieved 22 February 2021.
  11. "Campus arrests follow marijuana complaints (+ video) | Otago Daily Times Online News". odt.co.nz. Retrieved 22 February 2021.
  12. "Norml leader guilty | Otago Daily Times Online News". odt.co.nz. Retrieved 22 February 2021.
  13. "Druglawed (2015) - Full Cast & Crew". IMDb. Retrieved 22 February 2021.
  14. "Campaigners calling for conversation on cannabis law". Stuff.co.nz. Retrieved 22 February 2021.
  15. "Cannabis referendum: Legalisation could make NZ a cannabis tourism destination". Stuff.co.nz. Retrieved 22 February 2021.
  16. "Leadership change at Annual Conference | Scoop News". scoop.co.nz. Retrieved 22 February 2021.
  17. "Minorities of none | Otago Daily Times Online News". odt.co.nz. Retrieved 22 February 2021.
  18. "Protesters intent on staying camped in Octagon | Otago Daily Times Online News". odt.co.nz. Retrieved 22 February 2021.
  19. "Dunedin marijuana museum planned | Otago Daily Times Online News". odt.co.nz. Retrieved 22 February 2021.
  20. "NZ's first cannabis museum opens". NZ Herald. Retrieved 22 February 2021.
  21. "Activists hope to make Dunedin 'Cannabis capital'". Stuff.co.nz. Retrieved 22 February 2021.
  22. "A night at the (cannabis) museum". Stuff.co.nz. Retrieved 22 February 2021.
  23. "Who are the South Island's mayoral and council hopefuls?". Stuff.co.nz. Retrieved 22 February 2021.
  24. "Final day of campaigning before Mt Albert votes and 'it's Jacinda's election'". NZ Herald. Retrieved 22 February 2021.
  25. "Why vote for me? Mt Albert candidates in their own words". NZ Herald. Retrieved 22 February 2021.
  26. "TOP candidate's pitch for Dunedin North". Stuff.co.nz. Retrieved 22 February 2021.
  27. "Gareth Morgan's message on cannabis hits home". Stuff.co.nz. Retrieved 22 February 2021.
  28. "Three - Country Restricted". newshub.co.nz. Retrieved 22 February 2021.
  29. "Cannabis policy: Too important to be left to the politicians?". Stuff.co.nz. Retrieved 22 February 2021.
  30. "Where do political parties stand on cannabis law reform?". Stuff.co.nz. Retrieved 22 February 2021.
  31. "Dunedin cannabis museum moves to new central city joint". Stuff.co.nz. Retrieved 22 February 2021.
  32. "$4.20 coffees at Dunedin's newly-opened Cannabis Museum". Stuff.co.nz. Retrieved 22 February 2021.
  33. "New Zealand Today - The Dunnerz Cannabis Museum". YouTube. Retrieved 22 February 2021.
  34. "Rose Matafeo, Paul Horan and Guy Williams big winners at NZ Comedy Guild Awards". NZ Herald. Retrieved 22 February 2021.
  35. "Bitcoin millionaire bankrolls cut-price coffee to get pensioners into cannabis museum". Stuff.co.nz. Retrieved 22 February 2021.
  36. "Dunedin's Cannabis Museum left high and dry over alleged fake landlord". Stuff.co.nz. Retrieved 22 February 2021.
  37. "Helen Kelly pushes for dope vote". NZ Herald. Retrieved 22 February 2021.
  38. "Actress Lucy Lawless among backers of medicinal cannabis use". NZ Herald. Retrieved 22 February 2021.
  39. "Cannabis reform lobbyists accuse Facebook of stubbing out debate". Stuff.co.nz. Retrieved 22 February 2021.
  40. "Flying high: Customs officer warns museum curator over cannabis T-shirt". Stuff.co.nz. Retrieved 22 February 2021.
  41. "Private prosecution pending against University of Otago's bong-taking proctor". Stuff.co.nz. Retrieved 22 February 2021.
  42. "'I was wrong' - Proctor | Otago Daily Times Online News". odt.co.nz. Retrieved 22 February 2021.
  43. "Bong ' burglar' was in fact Otago University proctor Dave Scott". NZ Herald. Retrieved 22 February 2021.
  44. "'Unlawful' proctor 'not a bad dude' | Otago Daily Times Online News". odt.co.nz. Retrieved 22 February 2021.
  45. "Cannabis Museum moves north | Otago Daily Times Online News". odt.co.nz. Retrieved 22 February 2021.
  46. "Cannabis museum for Christchurch | Otago Daily Times Online News". odt.co.nz. Retrieved 22 February 2021.
  47. "'Cannabis maze' mooted for vacant central Christchurch site". Stuff.co.nz. Retrieved 22 February 2021.
  48. "Christchurch Cannabis museum searching for investors after failing to reach funding goal". Stuff.co.nz. Retrieved 22 February 2021.
  49. "The founder of a failed cannabis museum sounds a warning for similar startups". The Spinoff. Retrieved 22 February 2021.
  50. "Cannabis advocates aim to transform Christchurch heritage buildings into 'cannabis HQ'". Stuff.co.nz. Retrieved 22 February 2021.
  51. "NZ Cannabis Institute Pledge Me Campaign Ends on Monday | Scoop News". scoop.co.nz. Retrieved 22 February 2021.
  52. "Election 2020: Candidates up against it in Wellington Labour stronghold". Stuff.co.nz. Retrieved 22 February 2021.
  53. "Cannabis referendum: Election debate sees leaders, minister confess to smoking weed". Stuff.co.nz. Retrieved 22 February 2021.
  54. "Election 2020: The biggest moments of the campaign in pictures". Stuff.co.nz. Retrieved 22 February 2021.
  55. "electionresults_2020/electorate-details-60". electionresults.govt.nz. Retrieved 22 February 2021.
  56. "Referendum results: Cannabis legalisation narrowly loses vote". Stuff.co.nz. Retrieved 22 February 2021.
  57. "Election battle at the fringes: Conspiracy theorists, a student and that guy who doesn't want your vote". Stuff.co.nz. Retrieved 22 February 2021.
  58. "A cannabis cafe on Cuba St? Why not, says TOP leader". Stuff.co.nz. Retrieved 22 February 2021.
  59. "Cannabis lollipops, soft drinks and protein powder could be on the market for Kiwis following cannabis referendum". NZ Herald. Retrieved 22 February 2021.
  60. "Wellingtinny: Could the capital become the Colorado of New Zealand?". Stuff.co.nz. Retrieved 22 February 2021.
  61. "Cannabis museum leaving Christchurch heritage building for capital". Stuff.co.nz. Retrieved 22 February 2021.
  62. "Taranaki woman sparks debate on medical marijuana". Stuff.co.nz. Retrieved 22 February 2021.
  63. "Customs allows woman with cannabis through Auckland Airport". NZ Herald. Retrieved 22 February 2021.
  64. "New Zealand Participates in Clinical Trials for Epilepsy". The Marijuana Times. Retrieved 22 February 2021.
  65. "Three - Country Restricted". newshub.co.nz. Retrieved 22 February 2021.
  66. "Weed and woo: Separating facts from fiction on the health benefits of cannabis". The Spinoff. Retrieved 22 February 2021.
  67. "Great southern city: Christchurch in 2030". Stuff.co.nz. Retrieved 22 February 2021.
  68. "Gang members robbing and assaulting people using online app to buy drugs". Stuff.co.nz. Retrieved 22 February 2021.
  69. "2014 election results". electionresults.govt.nz. Retrieved 22 February 2021.
  70. "Declaration of Result" (PDF). Dunedin City Council. Retrieved 28 November 2016.
  71. "Official Count Results – Mount Albert". Electoral Commission. Retrieved 8 March 2017.
  72. "Official Count Results – Dunedin North (2017)". Electoral Commission. 7 October 2017. Retrieved 12 October 2017.
  73. "Official Count Results (2020) – Wellington Central". Electoral Commission. 17 October 2020.
  74. "Voter turnout statistics for the 2020 General Election". elections.nz. Retrieved 22 February 2021.
  1. 2014 Internet Mana swing is relative to the votes for Mana in 2011; it shared a party list with Internet in the 2014 election.

External links[edit]

Appearances[edit]

Articles[edit]

Campaign videos[edit]

Documentary[edit]

  • Druglawed, 2015 New Zealand documentary which covers Gray's activism with Otago NORML and his subsequent arrest. Druglawed documents the history of cannabis prohibition in the US and New Zealand, outlining political and economic reasons for its prohibition. It argues New Zealand mirrors the USA's war on drugs, and prohibition is failing.

Debates[edit]

Interviews[edit]

Academia[edit]

Livestream[edit]

News outlets[edit]

Podcast[edit]

Radio[edit]

YouTube video[edit]

Speeches[edit]

Videos[edit]

Media related to [[commons:Lua error in Module:WikidataIB at line 466: attempt to index field 'wikibase' (a nil value).|Lua error in Module:WikidataIB at line 466: attempt to index field 'wikibase' (a nil value).]] at Wikimedia Commons


This article "Abe Gray" is from Wikipedia. The list of its authors can be seen in its historical and/or the page Edithistory:Abe Gray. Articles copied from Draft Namespace on Wikipedia could be seen on the Draft Namespace of Wikipedia and not main one.