Frederick J. Haig

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Frederick James Haig (born 1868) was an American attorney who was one of the first law clerks to the justices of the Supreme Court of the United States, serving Associate Justice David Josiah Brewer from 1893 to 1910.[1] His 17 consecutive years of clerking make him among the longest serving in the history of the court, a feat equaled only by Clarence M. York.[2][3]

In 1868, Haig was born in Scotland and in 1874 emigrated with his family to the United States. He was raised in St. Louis, Missouri, and by 1885 worked as a stenographer in Chicago, Illinois. He later moved to Washington, D.C., and in 1889 worked as a messenger for the Committee on Washington, D.C. for the United States Senate. In 1893, he became the private secretary to David Josiah Brewer.[4] In May 1896, Haig graduated from National University with a LL.M..[5] After clerking for the Supreme Court, Haig worked in Washington, D.C..[6]

On December 8, 1896, Haig married Laura Moseley Morgan and they had two sons: Frederick Morgan Haig, who became a professor at North Carolina State University, and Quentin Frederick Haig.[7][8][9]

See also[edit]

  • List of law clerks of the Supreme Court of the United States
  • Clarence M. York
  • Everett Riley York
  • James S. Harlan
  • Thomas A. Russell
  • Frederick Emmons Chapin
  • Thomas H. Fitnam

References[edit]

  1. Peppers, Todd C. (Winter 2010). "The Supreme Court and the Curse of the Gypsy" (PDF). Green Bag 2d. 13: 173–186. Retrieved September 27, 2017.
  2. Peppers, Todd C. (2006). Courtiers of the Marble Palace: The Rise and Influence of the Supreme Court Law Clerk. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press. p. 49. ISBN 0804753822. Retrieved September 27, 2017. Search this book on Amazon.com Logo.png
  3. Ward, Artemus; Weiden, David L (2007). Sorcerers' Apprentices: 100 Years of Law Clerks at the United States Supreme Court. New York, NY: NYU Press. p. 32. ISBN 0814794203. Retrieved November 10, 2017. Search this book on Amazon.com Logo.png
  4. "Venezualan Commission Begins Its Work of Inquiry". Evening Star (Washington, D.C.). Library of Congress Historical Newspapers. January 11, 1896. p. 2. Retrieved November 8, 2017. Justice David J. Brewer, the president of the commission, presided and his private secretary, Frederick J. Haig
  5. "National University, List of Coming Commencement of its Law School, Names of Graduates". Evening Star (Washington, D.C.). Library of Congress Historic Newspapers. May 22, 1896. p. 6. Retrieved November 8, 2017.
  6. Official Register: Persons in the Civil, Military, and Naval Service of the United States, and List of Vessels. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Government Printing Office. 1911. p. 15. |access-date= requires |url= (help) Search this book on Amazon.com Logo.png
  7. "The Social World". Evening Star (Washington, D.C.). Library of Congress Historical Newspapers. December 9, 1896. p. 7. Retrieved November 8, 2017.
  8. "Society, Riverdale, MD". Evening Star (Washington, D.C.). Library of Congress Historical Newspapers. May 22, 1910. p. 4. Retrieved November 8, 2017.
  9. "Society, Riverdale, MD". Evening Star (Washington, D.C.). Library of Congress Historical Newspapers. July 23, 1911. p. 4. Retrieved November 8, 2017.

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