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List of victims of the Bazar de la Charité fire

From EverybodyWiki Bios & Wiki

The following people died in the Bazar de la Charité fire of 4 May 1897.

Sophie Charlotte of Bavaria
  • Hélène Barassé (1874-1897)
  • Sophie Charlotte of Bavaria, Duchess of Alençon (1847-1897). A leading patron of the bazaar, she had insisted on remaining until all those working under her had been rescued. Her body was unrecognisable, even to her personal maid, but was identified by her dentist on the basis of her gold fillings.[1]
  • Hélène Bernard-Dutreil (1878-1897)
  • Antonie de Bésiade d' Avaray, Comtesse Audéric de Moustier (1825-1897)
  • Claire Beucher de Saint Ange (1829-1897), sister of Laure Beucher (below). The two were visitors to the bazaar.[2] Her body was burned beyond recognition but she was initially identified by her maid on the basis of her red flannels, and the identification was later confirmed by her husband, General Eugène Chevals, from a scar on her breast.[3]
  • Laure Beucher de Saint Ange (1827-1897), sister of Claire Beucher (above). The two were visitors to the bazaar.[4] The baroness of Saint Ange's body was burned beyond recognition but was identified by her maid on the basis of three rings she had been wearing.[5]
  • Elise Blonska (1835-1897). A Russian immigrant who was librarian to Jules Claretie, she had been working a stall raising money for the blind. Her body, burned beyond recognition, was identified by her orthopaedic corset.[6] She was buried in the Montparnasse Cemetery on 13 May.[7]
  • Louise Boissié, Madame Eugène Chalmel (1835-1897)
  • Edmée Braun, Madame Etienne Moreau-Nélaton (1864-1897)
  • Clémence Capitaine, Marquise d'Isle (1847-1897)
  • Cécile Carrière, Madame Edmond Cuvillier (1847-1897)
  • Pauline Carrière, Madame Frédérixc Dillaye (1855-1897)
  • Jeanne Carteron (1862-1897), daughter of Amélie Guyard-Delalain (below)
  • Camille Chabot (1874-1897)
  • Madeleine de Clercq (1887-1897)
  • Marie de Commeau (1838-1897)
  • Dona Adélaïda Corradi y Anduga, Madame Florez (1847-1897), died of her injuries in Beaujon Hospital.[8]
  • Marguerite de Cossart d'Espiès (1847-1897)
  • Caroline Cosseron de Villenoisy (1828-1897)
  • Laure de Crussol d'Uzès, Countess of Hunolstein (1838-1897)
  • Ester Cuvillier (1892-1897)
  • Louise Dagneau, Madame Alphonse Gosse (1846-1897)
  • Amélie Daireaux, Madame Hugues de Carbonnel (1853-1897)
  • Claire Dalloyau (1838-1897), wife of Auguste Bouvyer, was a member of the Third Order of Saint Dominic.[9] She and her daughter were working at the duchess of Alençon's stall. The daughter suffered serious burns but survived. Mrs Bouvyer's body was entirely consumed by the fire, with no part recovered, requiring a court order to pronounce her dead.[10]
  • Flore Damiens dit Fortin, Madame Paul Hauducoeur (1845-1897)
  • Alfred David (1892-1897)
  • Lucie Dehondt (1871-1897), in religion Sr Vincent of the Daughters of Charity of Saint Vincent de Paul, was present with Sr Marie Ginoux and Valérie Verhasselt (both below) to raise money for the orphans of Le Raincy.[11]
  • Hélène Delaune (1876-1897)
  • Suzanne Dephieu, Madame Alexandre Rabèry (1849-1897)
  • Berthe Deschamps, Madame Alfred Gohin (1862-1897)
  • Valérie Demazières, Madame Léopold Germain (1841-1897)
  • Thérèse Donon (1857-1897), baroness Saint-Didier, attended the bazaar to assist her husband's aunt, the dowager baroness Saint-Didier (Louise Pedra, below). After being rescued she re-entered the building thinking her niece, Mademoiselle Kergorlay, was still inside.[12]
  • Joseph Donon (1883-1897)
  • Marie du Quesne (1857-1897), Viscountess Bonneval, whose husband had been a member of the Chamber of Deputies of the Third French Republic from 1885 to 1889. She was helping at one of the stalls in the bazaar. After escaping the fire she had re-entered the building to try to help a friend. Her body was identified by her husband on the basis of her jewellery. Her 15-year-old daughter fell ill and died nine days later.[13] Both were buried in the family vault in Issoudun.[14]
  • Germaine Feulard (1887-1897), daughter of following
  • Dr Henri Feulard (1858-1897), visited the bazaar together with his wife, their ten-year-old daughter Germaine (above), and the family maid Ernestine Moreau (below). The family became separated in the stampede. Dr Feulard re-entered the building in an attempt to save his daughter, but both perished, as did Ernestine Moreau. Mrs Feulard suffered critical burn injuries,[15] but survived.[16]
  • Alphonsine Fortin, Madame Eugène Vimont (1829-1897)
  • Jeanne Frémyn, Madame Léon Le Normand (1858-1897)
  • Annette Gabiot, Madame Firmin Goupil (1851-1897)
  • Eulalie Gariel, Madame Ferdinand Jauffred (1847-1897)
  • Juilie Garivet (1853-1897), in religion Sr Marie-Madeleine of the Blind Sisters of St Paul
  • Louise Gérondeau (1870-1897)
  • Marie Gillet, Madame Louis Borne (1863-1897)
  • Anna Ginoux de Fermon (1863-1897), in religion Sr Marie of the Daughters of Charity of Saint Vincent de Paul, was the superior of her order's house in Le Raincy. She was present with Sr Vincent Dehondt (above) and Valérie Verhasselt (below) to raise money for the orphans of Le Raincy.[17] Her remains were transported to Brittany for burial in the family vault. Her funeral mass was attended by thousands, including the Daughters of Charity of Nantes and 25 priests from the neighbourhood.[18]
  • Marie Glandaz, Madame Gustave Laneyrie (1854-1897)
  • Angèle Gosse (1877-1897)
  • Zoë Gosse (1878-1897)
  • Agnès de Gosselin, Comtesse Mimmerel (1874-1897)
  • Elisabeth Grenn de Saint Marsault, Baronne Carruel de Saint Martin (1836-1897)
  • Marguerite Gros, Madame Gaston de Clermont (1850-1897)
  • Blanche Grossier, (1852-1897), wife of the industrialist Achille Chouippe, who employed upwards of 300 workers. She kept the company accounts and took care to do right by her husband's employees. She had visited the bazaar as a customer. Her body was identified from her clothes.[19]
  • Hélène Guérard, Madame Fernand Duclos de Varanval (1873-1897)
  • Marie Guérin, Madame Benjamin Delaune (1853-1897)
  • Elizabeth de Guillebon (1873-1897)
  • Léonie Guillaumet (1868-1897), a young woman attached to the Daughters of Charity of St Vincent de Paul of Saint-Louis-en-l'Isle, accompanied Sr Joseph Sabatier (below) to assist with her efforts.[20]
  • Amélie Guyard-Delalain, (1829-1897), wife of Alfred Carteron and mother of Jeanne Carteron (above). She was at the bazaar to help with a stall to support the charitable works of the parish of Saint-Roch, Paris.[21]
  • Hélène de Haber, Comtesse de Horn (1831-1897), died of her injuries in Beaujon Hospital.[22]
  • Jenny Hartmann, Madame Nicolas Schlumberger (1828-1897)
  • Marie Louise Hatte de Chevilly (1876-1897)
  • Yvonne Hatte de Chevilly (1879-1897)
  • Madeleine Hauducoeur (1870-1897)
  • Henriette d'Hinnisdael (1874-1897)
  • Marie Hoskier (1858-1897), was the daughter of Emile Hoskier, the Danish consul general in Paris, and of Elise Weyer (below), and the wife of Eugène Roland-Gosselin, who belonged to a leading family of Parisian stockbrokers. A Protestant convert to Catholicism, she was very active in charitable projects.[23] Her mother also died in the fire.
    Marie Hoskier, wife of the stockbroker Eugène Roland-Gosselin
  • Emma Hubert, Madame Eugène Legrand (1833-1897)
  • Hélène d'Isle (1875-1897)
  • Alice Jacqmin (1880-1897)
  • Emma Jaume (1830-1897), wife of General Warnet, her second husband. She had previously been widowed as Madame de Terrasse, and visited the bazaar because her daughter by her first marriage was running a stall to benefit the Daughters of Charity of St Vincent de Paul of Clichy.[24] She was buried with her parents in the Cimetière Saint-Martin, Perpignan.[25]
  • Cécile Jullian, Madame François Buchillet (1845-1897)
The Viscountess of Poilloue of Saint-Perier (1850-1897), John Singer Sargent, 1883
  • Jeanne de Kergorlay (1849-1897), wife of Jean Guy de Poilloüe, count Saint-Périer, and mother of (among others) René de Saint-Périer. A large woman, she remained inside the building giving a leg-up to others escaping through a high window (including her niece, Mademoiselle Kergorlay) until the floor gave way.[26] Her body was identified by her children's governess on the basis of her jewellery, and the identification confirmed by her father.[27]
  • Angélique de la Briffe, Madame Eugène Huzar (1833-1897)
  • Isabelle de Lassus, Madame Joseph de Carayon La Tour (1834-1897)
  • Mathilde Leclerc de Juigné, Vicomtesse de Damas (1828-1897)
  • Lina Lefèvre-Finucane (1873-1897)
  • Laure Lejeune, Madame Abel Brasier de Thuy (1828-1897)
  • Marie Le Royer de la Tournerie, Vicomtesse de Malézieu (1869-1897)
  • Suzanne Le Sourd, Madame Pierre Cordoën (1869-1897)
  • Alix Loubaresse, Madame Adolphe Rivière (1848-1897)
  • Louise Lourmand (1868-1897)
  • Isabelle Maison, Madame Albert Lefèvre de Vatimesnil (1845-1897)
  • Antoinette de Mandat de Grancet (1876-1897)
  • Marie de Marbot, Madame Victor de Valence (1848-1897)
  • Eugénie Marlé (1853-1897), wife of Louis Chapuis, a businessmen in the Bercy neighbourhood, active in the charitable works of the parish of Saint Roch. Her body was burnt beyond recognition but was identified due to a bracelet.[28]
  • Albert Masure (1832-1897)
  • Christianne Meilhac (1882-1897), aged 15, visited the bazaar together with her grandfather, Victor Poidevin (below), and an old friend his, Dr Ernest Rochet (below). After calling at the stall where Mrs Rochet was assisting Viscountess Malézieu (above), the three took a turn around the building to admire the decorations. They were at the furthest point from the exit when the fire started.[29] Ms Meilhac's body was not identified for several days, until after her grandfather's funeral had already taken place.[30]
  • Laura Meinell, Viscountess d'Avenel (1855-1897). The wife of the economic historian Viscount Georges d'Avenel, Viscountess d'Avenel kept a salon noted for the attendance of leading figures in literature, the arts and diplomacy. On returning home from the catastrophe she did not seem seriously hurt, but she later died of internal injuries.[31] She was buried in the Père Lachaise Cemetery.[32]
  • Mathilde Michel, Madame Jules Pierre (1866-1897)
  • Claire Moisson (1855-1897)
  • Ernestine Moreau (1862-1897). Maid to the Feulard family (above), she was buried in Montmartre Cemetery.[33]
  • General Munier (1827-1897)
  • Camille Nélaton, Madame Adolphe Moreau (1840-1897)
  • Suzanne Nitot (1855-1897)
  • Jeanne Odart de Rilly, Comtesse Haward de la Blotterie (1850-1897)
  • Lydie Panon Desbassayns de Richemont, Madame Léon de Gosselin (1841-1897)
  • Louiza Francesca Pedra (1816-1897), dowager baroness of Saint-Didier. Born in London to Portuguese parents, and growing up in England, in 1836 she married Baron Armand-Aimé de Saint-Didier, a magistrate who would go on to become a director of the Compagnie des chemins de fer du Nord. As a widow she divided her time between socialising and charity work.[34]
  • Amélie Pellerin de Lastelle, Comtesse Sérrurier (1839-1897)
  • Marguerite Peretti, Madame Léon Valentin (1856-1897)
  • Pénélope Petrocochino (1836-1897), Widow of Antoine Vlasto, died of her injuries three days after the incident.[35]
  • Marie Louise Picqué (1863-1897)
  • Hélène de Poggenpohl, Madame Jacques Haussmann (1854-1897)
  • Victor Poidevin (1825-1897), visited the bazaar together with his granddaughter, Christiane Meilhac (above), and an old friend, Dr Ernest Rochet (below). After calling at the stall where Mrs Rochet was assisting Viscountess Malézieu (above), the three took a turn around the building to admire the decorations. They were at the furthest point from the exit when the fire started.[36]
  • Berthe Rabéry, Madame Louis Gentil (1873-1897)
  • Aline Ramboug, Madame Anatole Le Brun de Sesseval (1826-1897), was rescued from the fire by her 15-year-old granddaughter, Mademoiselle de Froissard, who re-entered the building to save her, but she died of her injuries four days later.[37]
  • Marguerite Rémond (1835-1897), in religion Sr Sainte Claire of the Blind Sisters of St Paul
  • Louise de Rivière, Comtesse Louis de Luppé (1844-1897)
  • Dr Ernest Rochet (1830-1897), visited the bazaar together with a friend, Mr Poidevin (above) and his granddaughter, Christiane Meilhac (above). After calling at the stall where Mrs Rochet was helping Viscountess Malézieu (above), the three took a turn around the building to admire the decorations. They were at the furthest point from the exit when the fire started. Dr Rochet was identified by scraps of clothing burnt to his body.[38]
  • Marie Roubaud de Cournand, Madame Maurice Lafitte de Canson (1844-1897)
  • Adèle Sabatier (1830-1897), in religion Sr Joseph of the Daughters of Charity of Saint Vincent de Paul, was one of three Daughters of Charity to die in the fire, the only one from the community in Saint-Louis-en-l'Isle.[39]
  • Josephine Saintin, Madame Charles Monti (1851-1897)
  • Antoinette Senez, Madame Auguste du Verdier de Suze (1842-1897)
  • Marie Thérèse Simon (1874-1897)
  • Emilie Stiebel, Madame Louis Kann (1849-1897)
  • Louise Terre (1849-1897)
  • Virginie Thomazeau, Soeur Electa des Filles de la Croix Saint André (1826-1897)
  • Lucy Touttain, Madame Emile Nitot (1863-1897)
  • Valèrie Tuquet de La Boisserie, Vicomtesse de Beauchamp (1867-1897)
  • Antoinette de Valence de Minardière (1877-1897)
  • Marguerite de Valence de Minardière (1880-1897)
  • Sabine de Vallin (1838-1897)
  • Elodie Van Biervelet (1877-1897)
  • Valérie Verhasselt (1876-1897), aged 20, a boarder at the orphanage run by the Daughters of Charity of St Vincent de Paul in Le Raincy, had accompanied Sr Marie Ginoux and Sr Vincent Dehondt (both above) to the bazaar. She was buried in Raincy cemetery.[40]
  • Julia de Villiers de La Noue, Marquise de Bouthillier Chavigny (1844-1897)
  • Justine Waller, Comtesse Jules Couret de Villeneuve (1857-1897)
  • Mathilde de Weisweiller, Madame Théodore Porgès (1854-1897)
  • Elise Weyer (1836-1897), wife of Emile Hoskier, the Danish consul general in Paris, died together with her daughter Marie Hoskier (above), wife of the stockbroker Eugène Roland-Gosselin.
  • Germaine d'Yrenne de Lalanne, Comtesse d'Isoard Vauvenargues (1867-1897)

References[edit]

  1. L'Avenir, May 7, 1897.
  2. Comtesse D. de Beaurepaire de Louvagny, Les Martyrs de la charité (Paris, 1897), p. 67.
  3. L'Avenir, May 7, 1897.
  4. Comtesse D. de Beaurepaire de Louvagny, Les Martyrs de la charité (Paris, 1897), p. 67.
  5. L'Avenir, May 7, 1897.
  6. Comtesse D. de Beaurepaire de Louvagny, Les Martyrs de la charité (Paris, 1897), p. 29.
  7. "L'enterrement de Mlle de Blonska", L'Express du Midi, 14 May 1897
  8. "Récapitulation des victimes", Le Petit Parisien, May 8, 1897.
  9. L'Année Dominicaine (1897), p. 249.
  10. Comtesse D. de Beaurepaire de Louvagny, Les Martyrs de la charité (Paris, 1897), pp. 44-35.
  11. Annales de la Congrégation de la Mission (Lazaristes) et de la Compagnie des Filles de la Charité (Paris, 1897), p. 362.
  12. Comtesse D. de Beaurepaire de Louvagny, Les Martyrs de la charité (Paris, 1897), p. 247.
  13. Comtesse D. de Beaurepaire de Louvagny, Les Martyrs de la charité (Paris, 1897), pp. 30-35.
  14. http://www.lanouvellerepublique.fr/Indre/Loisirs/Patrimoine-tourisme/n/Contenus/Articles/2012/08/04/La-mort-tragique-de-la-vicomtesse-de-Bonneval
  15. "Récapitulation des victimes", Le Petit Parisien, May 8, 1897.
  16. Comtesse D. de Beaurepaire de Louvagny, Les Martyrs de la charité (Paris, 1897), p. 329.
  17. Annales de la Congrégation de la Mission (Lazaristes) et de la Compagnie des Filles de la Charité (Paris, 1897), pp. 362, 365.
  18. Annales de la Congrégation de la Mission (Lazaristes) et de la Compagnie des Filles de la Charité (Paris, 1898), pp. 340-342.
  19. Comtesse D. de Beaurepaire de Louvagny, Les Martyrs de la charité (Paris, 1897), pp. 68-71.
  20. Annales de la Congrégation de la Mission (Lazaristes) et de la Compagnie des Filles de la Charité (Paris, 1897), p. 362.
  21. Comtesse D. de Beaurepaire de Louvagny, Les Martyrs de la charité (Paris, 1897), p. 61.
  22. "Récapitulation des victimes", Le Petit Parisien, May 8, 1897.
  23. Comtesse D. de Beaurepaire de Louvagny, Les Martyrs de la charité (Paris, 1897), p. 243.
  24. Comtesse D. de Beaurepaire de Louvagny, Les Martyrs de la charité (Paris, 1897), p. 306.
  25. https://www.appl-lachaise.net/appl/article.php3?id_article=1134
  26. Comtesse D. de Beaurepaire de Louvagny, Les Martyrs de la charité (Paris, 1897), pp. 248-249.
  27. L'Avenir, May 7, 1897.
  28. Comtesse D. de Beaurepaire de Louvagny, Les Martyrs de la charité (Paris, 1897), p. 64.
  29. Comtesse D. de Beaurepaire de Louvagny, Les Martyrs de la charité (Paris, 1897), pp. 20-21.
  30. "Reconnaissance du cadavre de Mlle Meilhac", Le Petit Parisien, May 9, 1897.
  31. Comtesse D. de Beaurepaire de Louvagny, Les Martyrs de la charité (Paris, 1897), p. 18.
  32. "Les obsèques particulières", Le Matin, 9 May 1897
  33. "Les obsèques particulières", Le Matin, 9 May 1897
  34. Comtesse D. de Beaurepaire de Louvagny, Les Martyrs de la charité (Paris, 1897), pp. 247-248.
  35. "Deux nouveaux décès", Le Petit Parisien, May 9, 1897.
  36. Comtesse D. de Beaurepaire de Louvagny, Les Martyrs de la charité (Paris, 1897), pp. 20-21.
  37. "Deux nouveaux décès", Le Petit Parisien, May 9, 1897.
  38. Comtesse D. de Beaurepaire de Louvagny, Les Martyrs de la charité (Paris, 1897), pp. 20-21.
  39. Annales de la Congrégation de la Mission (Lazaristes) et de la Compagnie des Filles de la Charité (Paris, 1897), p. 362.
  40. "Au Raincy", Le Petit Parisien, May 9, 1897.


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