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South Ossetia–United States relations

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South Ossetia–United States relations

South Ossetia

United States

South Ossetia–United States relations refers to the diplomatic relations between South Ossetia and the United States. South Ossetia and the United States do not have official diplomatic relations due in large part of the United States recognizing the region of South Ossetia as part of Georgia. A position recognized by Georgia and the majority of United Nations member states. The United States' lack of relations with South Ossetia has been one of the focal points of conflict between Russia and the United States since the Russo-Georgian War in which the United States blamed Russia for invading sovereign Georgian territory.

History[edit]

In response to the Russo-Georgian War then-American President George W. Bush condemned Russia for the war stating on August 11, 2008, "Russia has invaded a sovereign neighbouring state and threatens a democratic government elected by its people. Such an action is unacceptable in the 21st century." Bush also said, "There’s evidence that Russian forces may soon begin bombing the civilian airport in the capital city." Bush urged Russia to sign the EU-mediated ceasefire agreement, otherwise, Russia would "jeopardize" its standing with the West.[1] Although the Bush administration contemplated a military reaction to defend Georgia, it decided against it so as to not provoke a conflict with Russia. Instead, the US sent humanitarian assistance to Georgia on military aircraft.[2] George W. Bush condemned the actions taken by Russia and called on them to "reconsider this irresponsible decision." Bush then stated that in "accordance with United Nations Security Council Resolutions that remain in force, Abkhazia and South Ossetia are within the internationally recognised borders of Georgia, and they must remain so."[3] Then-Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice also said the decision made by Russia was "regrettable" and further stated that since "the United States is a permanent member of the Security Council this simply will be dead on arrival in the Security Council."[4] President George W. Bush acknowledged the ceasefire accord brokered by the then-President of France and European Council, Nicolas Sarkozy. The accord was signed by then-Russian President Dmitry Medvedev on August 12, 2008[5] and by then-Georgian President Mikheil Saakashvili on August 15, 2008.[6]

President Bush stated that he would send Condoleezza Rice to Tbilisi in order to "convey America's unwavering support for Georgia's democratic government."[7] He also called upon Russia to respect the sovereignty and territorial integrity of Georgia. The Russian government welcomed the support expressed by President Bush for the ceasefire accords but stated "[i]t is regrettable, however, that the American side continues to refuse to recognise the real cause of what happened, consisting in that the regime of Mikhail Saakashvili had in violation of all its international commitments unleashed the war against the South Ossetian people."[8]

In October 2009, then-Secretary of State Hillary Clinton said that the United States would not recognize the independence of Abkhazia and South Ossetia.[9]

On March 18, 2015, the South Ossetian and Russian presidents, Leonid Tibilov and Vladimir Putin signed an "alliance and integration" treaty.[10] The agreement includes provisions to incorporate the South Ossetian military into Russia's armed forces, integrate the customs service of South Ossetia into that of Russia's, and commit Russia to paying state worker salaries in South Ossetia at rates equal to those in the North Caucasian Federal District.[11] The Associated Press described the treaty as calling for "nearly full integration" and compared it to a 2014 agreement between Russia and Abkhazia.[10] The Georgian Foreign Ministry described the signing of the treaty as "actual annexation" of the disputed region by Russia, and the United States and European Union said they would not recognize it.[12][13]

Since 2017 under the Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2017 signed into law by then-president Donald Trump bans American foreign aid to Abkhazia and South Ossetia and according to the bill that "none of the funds appropriated by this Act may be made available for assistance for the central government of a country that the Secretary of State determines and reports to the Committees on Appropriations has recognized the independence of, or has established diplomatic relations with, the Russian occupied Georgian territories of Abkhazia and Tskhinvali Region/South Ossetia."[14] The ban on foreign aid to Abkhazia and South Ossetia continued the following year under the Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2018 designating $105.3 million dollars in aid to Georgia. The law stated that the Secretary of Treasury, "shall instruct the United States executive directors of international financial institutions to vote against any assistance for any of their programs (including any loan, credit, or guarantee) that violates the sovereignty and territorial integrity of Georgia." And that the Secretary, however, is authorized to waive these restrictions, if he/she "determines and reports to the Committees on Appropriations that to do so is in the national interest of the United States, and includes a justification for such interest."[15] The 2020 United States federal budget under the Further Consolidated Appropriations Act for 2020 signed into law in 2019 designated $132 million dollars in foreign aid to Georgia continued the outlawing of American aid to Abkhazia and South Ossetia under the authority of the Secretary of the Treasury.[16]

In response to Russian President Vladimir Putin's August 8, 2017 visit to Abkhazia, the U.S. referred to it as "inappropriate". The U.S. State Department stated "The United States fully supports Georgia's sovereignty and territorial integrity within its internationally recognized borders and rejects Russia’s recognition of Abkhazia and South Ossetia."[17]

In 2018, the U.S. condemned Syria for establishing formal relations with Abkhazia and South Ossetia referring to the two regions as "Russian-occupied".[18]

See also[edit]


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Some use of "" in your query was not closed by a matching "".Some use of "" in your query was not closed by a matching "".

  • Foreign relations of South Ossetia
  • Foreign relations of the United States
  • International recognition of Abkhazia and South Ossetia
  • Abkhazia–Russia relations
  • Abkhazia–South Ossetia relations
  • Abkhazia–United States relations
  • Georgia–United States relations
  • Russia–United States relations
  • Russia–South Ossetia relations

References[edit]

  1. "Moscow threatens Georgia regime, says Bush". Financial Times. 12 August 2008. Archived from the original on 22 December 2016. Unknown parameter |url-status= ignored (help)
  2. Ben Smith (2 March 2010). "U.S. pondered military use in Georgia". Politico. Archived from the original on 6 February 2010. Unknown parameter |url-status= ignored (help)
  3. "President Bush Condemns Actions Taken by Russian President in Regards to Georgia". White House Office of the Press Secretary. August 26, 2008. Retrieved April 25, 2021.
  4. "Russia recognises Georgian rebels". BBC News. August 26, 2008. Retrieved April 25, 2021.
  5. "Press Statement following Negotiations with French President Nicolas Sarkozy". President of Russia (Press release). 12 August 2008. Archived from the original on 23 August 2008. Unknown parameter |url-status= ignored (help)
  6. "Bush criticizes Moscow's actions in Georgia". Reuters. September 15, 2008. Retrieved April 25, 2021.
  7. "President Bush Discusses Situation in Georgia, Urges Russia to Cease Military Operations". White House (Press release). August 13, 2008. Retrieved April 25, 2021.
  8. "Russian MFA Spokesman Andrei Nesterenko Commentary in Connection with US President George Bush's Statement on South Ossetia". Russian Ministry of Foreign Affairs (Press release). August 14, 2008. Retrieved April 25, 2021.
  9. "Госсекретарь США Клинтон отказалась признать Абхазию и Юго-Осетию". KM.RU. October 13, 2009. Archived from the original on November 26, 2009. Unknown parameter |url-status= ignored (help)
  10. 10.0 10.1 "Putin signs treaty integrating South Ossetia into Russia". Yahoo News. March 18, 2015. Archived from the original on January 5, 2016. Retrieved April 9, 2021. Unknown parameter |url-status= ignored (help)
  11. "Putin Endorses Draft Treaty on 'Integration' with Tskhinvali". Civil Georgia. March 6, 2015. Archived from the original on April 5, 2021. Retrieved April 9, 2021. Unknown parameter |url-status= ignored (help)
  12. "Moscow, Tskhinvali Sign 'Integration Treaty'". Civil Georgia. March 18, 2015. Archived from the original on April 2, 2015. Retrieved April 9, 2021. Unknown parameter |url-status= ignored (help)
  13. "Russian treaty with rebel Georgian region alarms West". SWI. March 18, 2015. Archived from the original on April 2, 2015. Retrieved April 9, 2021. Unknown parameter |url-status= ignored (help)
  14. "Draft U.S. Budget Bans Aid to Governments Recognizing Abkhazia, S.Ossetia Independence". Civil Georgia. May 4, 2017. Retrieved April 9, 2021.
  15. "U.S. Budget Bans Aid to Governments Recognizing Abkhazia, S.Ossetia". Civil Georgia. March 24, 2018. Retrieved April 9, 2021.
  16. "U.S. Budget Bans Aid to Governments Recognizing Abkhazia, Tskhinvali". Civil Georgia. December 24, 2019. Retrieved April 9, 2021.
  17. "U.S. Says Putin Visit To Georgia's Abkhazia 'Inappropriate'". Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty. August 9, 2017. Retrieved April 9, 2021.
  18. "U.S. condemns Syria's ties with Georgian breakaway regions". Reuters. May 30, 2018. Retrieved April 9, 2021.


United States Category:Bilateral relations of the United States Category:Georgia (country)–United States relations


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