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The Hungry Fox: a Tale Told in Rhymes

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The Hungry Fox: a Tale Told in Rhymes
AuthorCole Adams
IllustratorCole Adams
Languageenglish
GenreChildren's picture book
Published2018
ISBN978-9920-36-364-8

The Hungry Fox a Fable Told in Rhyme is a remarkable Children's Fable that will teach your kids about the outcome of good and bad behaviour in such an enjoyable and engaging read. Told in verses and rhymes and illustrated in a unique style, this poetic and enchanting title is a must read for any children's book lover.

Playful storytelling, musical dialogues, entertaining situations, moral lessons, uniquely designed characters and colourful scenery are all guaranteed to make you come back time and time again.

Counting more than 2000 words, with 7 captivating chapters spread over more than 4 pages each, opening and closing poems, and a special longer chapter with the wisest animal of the bunch. Long moments of literary fun await. A poetic and enchanting tale written and illustrated both for children of all ages and adults alike.

Plot[edit | edit source]

♦A fox’s quest to search for food, turns out to be a life-changing lesson in how to be good.♦

One of the most important things in a children’s book is that it teaches a lesson. Cole Adams' The Hungry Fox a Fable Told in Rhyme does that and much more. The story chronicles a fox’s journey to find food after waking up one winter day. Along the way, he makes many mistakes and learns a lesson each time. Each chapter is set up as an interaction with a different animal in the story with rhyming narration and dialogues.

Follow the mischievous Fox in his adventure and enjoy reading about his many encounters with his virtuous neighbours that do not only speak, but love to rhyme. The fox will learn how to correct his bad moral traits such as greed, dishonesty, arrogance, trickery, rudeness, lack of manners and so on...

Vocabulary and style[edit | edit source]

Parents describe this book as the perfect starter for advanced English vocabulary. It also acts as a welcomed SURPRISE, mailed to your spouse or friend that is navigating parenting and could surely use a laugh!
 
But truthfully, the best way to gift it is to yourself and your little monster! It is time to snuggle up and enjoy the perfect children's book together. 
 
It will instantly become a bedtime favourite for the whole family. 

There is some very high level vocabulary in the book.  For example, in the chapter about greed, Adams uses the word avaricious to describe the fox. This is a word that many children would not be familiar with. However, being that the entire chapter is about greed, they can use context clues to determine its meaning.

Overall, the story reads well with a continuous and consistent plot structure. The theme is evident throughout. The Hungry Fox is written in the style of a fable.  Talking animals that are used to teach a moral. In this case, each chapter teaches its own separate moral.  In Chapter 1, the fox learns about greed.  In Chapter 2, he learns about pride.  Chapter 3 is a lesson on honesty.  All in all, I counted seven different character traits/lessons in the book. There is some very high level vocabulary in the book.  For example, in the chapter about greed, Adams uses the word avaricious to describe the fox.  This is a word that many children would not be familiar with at all.  However, being that the entire chapter is about greed, they can use context clues to determine its meaning. Overall, the story reads well with a continuous and consistent plot structure.  The theme is evident throughout.

Illustrations[edit | edit source]

The book itself is visually striking. The illustrations are mostly in the style of a mosaic pieced together using different geometric shapes. It is a very unique style for illustrating a children’s book.  The colours are bright and engaging with a slightly fanciful air. The layout of the Table of Contents is as unique as the illustrations.  It is set up as a map with the chapters laid out as way-points in a journey.  Again, in place of what could be a droll portion of the book, the Table of Contents is creative and visually engaging.

Table of content[edit | edit source]

The layout of the Table of Contents is as unique as the illustrations. It is set up as a map with the chapters laid out as way-points in a journey. Again, in place of what could be a droll portion of the book, the Table of Contents is creative and visually engaging.

Chapters Titles Short description Moral lesson of the chapter
1 The fox and the bear Greed Greed
2 The fox and the rabbits Arrogance Arrogance
3 The fox and the monkey stealing and lying stealing and lying
4 The fox and the elephant Ruse Ruse
5 The fox and the giraffe Stealing Stealing
6 The fox and the raccoon Rudeness Rudeness
7 The fox and the squirrel  infringement of trust infringement of trust
8 The fox and the Owl  Texte de la cellule all the lessons

Moral lessons and teaching points[edit | edit source]

The Hungry Fox has all the classic characteristics of a fable and reads like one as well. This lends itself very nicely to using it in a unit on fables and comparing it to the classic fables. Doing a comparison/contrast activity with a classic fable would be a very good way to use this book. As an example: Talk about the various character traits/morals that the fox learns along its journey and list them. Have students try to think of other stories/movies that they have read or seen that would teach that same lesson.

Reading is the best way to spur writing. Once the students have read and compared several different fables, have them write one of their own. Assign the students one of the morals that The Hungry Fox teaches and let them create their story.  If some students are more drawn towards visual arts, encourage them to write theirs in a graphic novel type genre. Select 5-10 of the high level vocabulary words from the book and have the students look them up and write the definition in their own words. Being able to summarise and rewrite things is a huge skill necessary for most standardised tests.

This book simply lends itself very well to discussion. The obvious morals taught in the book are great for prompting discussion with your kids or students. “What did the fox learn about greed?” and “Do you think that this is true in your own lives?”  are good examples of possible discussion questions.

The Hungry Fox a Fable Told in Verse, again, is a modernised version of the classic fable genre. An instant modern Classic. Definitely recommended using it for a unit on fables. 

The illustrations were done in a geometric/mosaic style that is very unique for children's picture book. It would be a fun book for an art teacher to use as a cross curricular aid to incorporate literacy into an art unit as well.

References[edit | edit source]


Others articles of the Topic Children's literature : Baby (MacLachlan novel), The House That Had Enough, Zachary Quack Minimonster, Witch & Wizard: The Fire, Gay Hay, The Adventures of Super Pickle, A Lion in the Meadow
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The Hungry Fox a Fable Told in Rhyme Children's Book by Cole Adams[edit | edit source]

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