Autochorrisexuality

From EverybodyWiki Bios & Wiki


Autochorrisexuality (also known as aegosexuality[1][2]) refers to a disconnect between oneself and an object of sexual arousal.[3] Common in asexual people, it describes sexual behaviours typically including fantasising about sexual relationships but lacking the desire to partake in them. It is sometimes considered an asexual sub-identity.

Etymology[edit]

The term "Autochorissexual" was coined by Anthony Bogaert, but there was disagreement with the concepts behind it, leading to the alternative name "aegosexual".[4]

Behaviours[edit]

Autochorrisexuality is an obscure form of asexuality,[5][6] and comprises of having sexual fantasies, but without the desire to participate in them.[7] Autochorrisexual people have been known to practise masturbation while disliking the idea of sexual intercourse,[1] fantasise about sex while envisioning other people or fictional characters,[1] and view pornography or erotica to induce sexual arousal.[6] Some have written fanfiction after experiencing sexual desire induced by fictional characters.[8]

References[edit]

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 Melody Thomas (26 June 2018). "There is more to asexuality than its definition implies". Stuff.co.nz. Retrieved 19 April 2019.
  2. "【柏拉圖式戀愛?】渴望愛情卻不想做愛 無性戀者常被誤為性冷感". hk01.com (in Chinese). 4 July 2018. Retrieved 19 April 2019.CS1 maint: Unrecognized language (link)
  3. Gabrielle Ronna (18 January 2016). "Understanding Asexuality In A World Obsessed With Sex And Love". The Odyssey Online. Retrieved 19 April 2019.
  4. Fay Onyx (13 July 2017). "Here's Everything You Learn About Yourself When You Realize You're Asexual". Thought Catalog. Retrieved 19 April 2019.
  5. Adjoa D. Danso (22 October 2017). "What Being Asexual Means to Me". Teen Vogue. Retrieved 19 April 2019.
  6. 6.0 6.1 Shikha Kumar (18 March 2017). "Meet India's newest sexual minority: The asexuals". Hindustan Times. Retrieved 19 April 2019.
  7. Charlotte Phillips (27 June 2018). "Asexual woman says she doesn't want to be sexually intimate with ANYONE – but admits she still has fantasies". The Sun. Retrieved 19 April 2019.
  8. Richa Kaul Padte (6 March 2017). "How Some Asexuals Use Erotica to Get Off". Vice. Retrieved 19 April 2019.


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