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David J. Becker

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David J. Becker
Born
🏳️ NationalityUSA
🏫 Education
  • BA in History and Juris Doctor
🎓 Alma materUniversity of California, Berkeley
💼 Occupation
Election law expert
👔 EmployerCenter for Election Innovation & Research (CEIR)
Known forWork in election administration and electoral integrity
TitleExecutive Director of CEIR
🌐 Websitehttps://electioninnovation.org/
🥚 TwitterTwitter=
label65 = 👍 Facebook

David J. Becker is an American attorney and public policy specialist with a focus on election administration and electoral integrity. He is the founder and Executive Director of the Center for Election Innovation & Research (CEIR)[1] a nonpartisan 501(c)(3) organization[2] that works with election officials to ensure the integrity and accessibility of U.S. elections.[3] Becker is a regular commentator on election law for CBS News [4] and has been cited in various other media outlets for his expertise in election law and practice.

In 2022, Becker was named one of Washington DC's 500 Most Influential People by Washingtonian.[5]

Education and career[edit]

Becker completed a B.A. in history from the University of California, Berkeley and a J.D. from the UC Berkeley School of Law.[6]

His early career included seven years in the Voting Section of the United States Department of Justice Civil Rights Division[7][8] overseeing voting rights enforcement in states including California and Georgia. He also served as lead counsel on significant cases such as Georgia v. Ashcroft,[9] which was ultimately decided by the U.S. Supreme Court.

Following his time at the Department of Justice, Becker served as director of the elections program at The Pew Charitable Trusts,[10] advocating for electoral reform. While at Pew, he led development of the Electronic Registration Information Center (ERIC), an initiative that facilitates the sharing of voter registration information among states to improve the accuracy of voter rolls.[11] In August 2016, Becker founded the Center for Election Innovation & Research (CEIR) to promote the integrity and accessibility of U.S. elections. Under his direction, CEIR collaborates with election officials and policymakers, provides resources and guidance to enhance the electoral process,[12] and coordinates pro bono legal defense for election officials under threat or harassment.[13]

Media work and publications[edit]

Becker is frequently featured in national media as an election law analyst. His commentary has been included in publications such as The New York Times[14] and The Washington Post,[15] and he has made television appearances on networks including CNN,[16] MSNBC,[17] and PBS NewsHour,[18] as well as radio appearances on NPR.[19]

Together with CBS News Chief Washington Correspondent Major Garrett, Becker co-authored the book The Big Truth: Upholding Democracy in the Age of The Big Lie[20] which discusses challenges facing contemporary democratic processes in the face of election denialism and declining trust in institutions.

Personal life[edit]

Becker was a two-time champion on Jeopardy![21] and a winner on Who Wants to Be a Millionaire?[22]

External links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. "Center for Election Innovation and Research (CEIR)". Ballotpedia. 2020-09-03. Retrieved 2023-11-05.
  2. "Center for Election Innovation & Research". Charity Navigator. Retrieved 2023-11-09.
  3. "About CEIR". Center for Election Innovation & Research. Retrieved 2023-11-09.
  4. "Where U.S. election safety stands ahead of 2024". CBS News. Retrieved 2023-11-15.
  5. "Washington DC's 500 Most Influential People: Good Government". Washingtonian. Washingtonian Media Inc. 2022-05-03. Retrieved 2023-11-15.
  6. Brown, Michael, ed. (2019). The Future of Election Administration. Palgrave Pilot. p. xii. Search this book on
  7. "Legal experts baffled by sentence for registering to vote". Associated Press. 2020-05-22. Retrieved 2023-11-15.
  8. "David J. Becker bio" (PDF). US House of Representatives. 2016-09-13. Retrieved 2023-11-09.
  9. "Georgia v. Ashcroft". Casetext. Retrieved 2023-11-15.
  10. "Q and A With David Becker, Nat'l Conference of State Legislatures". YouTube. 2015-08-04. Retrieved 2023-11-15.
  11. "Pew's David Becker Discusses the Electronic Registration Information Center". The Pew Charitable Trusts. 2013-06-28. Retrieved 2023-11-15.
  12. "Letter in Support of the Center for Election Innovation & Research (CEIR) and CEIR Executive Director David Becker". Retrieved 2023-11-09.
  13. McNamara, Sylvie (2022-10-28). ""Overwhelmed With Disinformation": Inside an Effort to Help Local Election Officials". Washingtonian. Washingtonian Media Inc. Retrieved 2023-11-15.
  14. Rutenberg, Jim (2022-11-15). "In the midterms, voters who trusted elections were more likely to vote". New York Times. Retrieved 2023-11-09.
  15. Gardner, Amy (2022-11-15). "Election deniers take aim at group that helps states maintain voter rolls". Washington Post. Retrieved 2023-03-06.
  16. "David Becker on CNN Newsroom". YouTube. 2020-08-14. Retrieved 2023-11-09.
  17. "'The Big Truth' Shows How 2020 Election Was 'Valid, Verifiable'". MSNBC. 2020-08-14. Retrieved 2023-11-09.
  18. "An election expert answers viewer questions about voting". PBS NewsHour. 2020-08-21. Retrieved 2023-11-09.
  19. "Death threats and harassment: 2024 election workers already are scared". National Public Radio. 2023-06-23. Retrieved 2023-11-09.
  20. Diversion Books. "The Big Truth: Upholding Democracy in the Age of "The Big Lie"". Retrieved 2023-11-09.
  21. "David Becker contestant page at J! Archive". Retrieved 2023-11-05.
  22. "David Becker page at 'Who Wants to Be a Millionaire?'". Retrieved 2023-11-05.


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