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Gender Mosaic

From EverybodyWiki Bios & Wiki




Gender Mosaic is one of the first trans-gender social and support groups to be created in Canada. Founded in 1988[1][2] in Ottawa, Canada, Gender Mosaic is thought to be the oldest ongoing trans group.

History[edit]

The founding members established a group to reflect their needs, and started holding meetings. The group name changed at least once[3] to better reflect the intent and purpose of the group. Later, bylaws were drafted and an executive was created. The group was incorporated in 2012.

The group was founded before the term "trans" was in widespread use, and when the multi-letter abbreviation LGBTTQQIAAPI was early in its evolution. The term "trans" is often used to represent those described as transgender, transsexual, and transvestite. It also includes those who are gender fluid and those who fall in the category of non-binary. The name Gender Mosaic attempts to include those terms, categories and others across the gender identity spectrum. Gender Mosaic was not initially the group's name, and was the result of discussions of and refinement of the purpose of the group.

Pride Parade[edit]

Gender Mosaic often participates in the Capital Pride (Ottawa) Pride Parade, and built the first 40 foot (13 metre) float[4]. The parade features large floats to this day.

Bill C-16[edit]

Members of the group assisted with and supported the process of the Gender Identity Bill, C-16 .[5][6][7]

Members of Parliament and the Senate were consulted with and lobbied over a period of several years before the bill was tabled and passed.

Amnesty International assisted with the Bill C-16 process by spreading the word[8] and establishing a web site to promote the bill, and the cause.

Early affiliations[edit]

Around the time the group was formed, it established contact with a group in California called Tri-Ess (Society for the Second Self). Gender Mosaic opted for inclusivity with the greater gender community and did not ultimately retain a close relationship with that group.

Community[edit]

The group maintains relationships with other trans groups across the country (and elsewhere in the world) and other groups within the LGBTTQQIAAPI community.

Gender Mosaic represents a community of transgender people, and participates in the general community at large. The group is open to male-to-female as well as female-to-male members. Members take part in the annual Ottawa pride parade, and have assisted in the organisation thereof.

Of significance is the effort applied to support the Gender Identity Bill, C-16.[5] Originally introduced as bill C-389[9], and then as C-279, and subsequently re-introduced as bill C-204, bill C-16 received royal assent in 2017.[10]

TDOR[edit]

A significant event for the trans community is the TDoR (Trans Day of Remembrance) which is held towards the end of the year[11]. The TDoR is a day of commemoration for those no longer with us.

The group celebrates occasional milestone events, such as its 20th, 25th and 30th anniversaries[12]. Such events are attended by GM members, supporters, members of the community at large, and occasionally members of various levels of government or parliament.

Out-Reach[edit]

The group takes an active role in informing the greater community of the existence of the trans community by making contact with and presentations to police forces, schools at various levels and other entities. Now that gender diversity clinics exist at medical institutions across the country, for children as well as adults, this is more important than ever.[13][14] A key aim of the group is to reduce the level of anti-trans sentiment, trans-phobia, and to thwart the high level of suicide among those who identifiy as 'trans'. This is particularly important in this age of "it get's better", and with the growing number of trans-children who self-declare.

Governance[edit]

Elections are held, as defined in the GM bylaws, on an annual basis. The executive consists of a president, two vice presidents, a treasurer and a secretary. All activity is on a volunteer basis. A membership fee generates revenue. Executive meetings are held periodically, and group meetings for the membership occur once a month. Stewardship of several trans-support funds, resulting from grants. [specific details to be added]

Newsletter and social media[edit]

The creation of the group saw the start of the newsletter, named after a literary work, Notes from the Underground. The newsletter existed for many years, but is no longer written. Copies were donated to a Trans Library.

Gender Mosaic has a web site, and exists is several forms in social media (such as Facebook). Some information on the group can be found using common search engines.

Members[edit]

Members meet periodically for social and other purposes, and assist in the organisation of the only trans convention in Canada, which is held in the spring. The convention attracts trans folks and supporters from around the country, the USA, and Europe.

Member privacy[edit]

Not all members within the trans community are comfortable with presenting their true gender in the world at large, and lead secret lives, remaining 'in the closet'. As a result, privacy is a significant concern for the group and those associated with it.

Awards[edit]

Members in the group have received numerous awards from the community at large. This includes an award from the Senate of Canada relating to Bill-C16. [details and a reference to follow]

Covid-19[edit]

In 2020, the Covid-19 pandemic was declared. As with activity around the planet, activities in the group have been significantly curtailed.

Future[edit]

Gender Mosaic is currently preparing to apply for charitable organisation status.

Create, publish and develop a body of articles specific to trans issues, in an attempt to foster a more serious societal attitude towards the trans community, whatever the age.

Target publishing vehicles are such neutral entities as the Wikipedia, such historical journals that might accept such articles (many would not) as well as national public broadcasters.

(note that some of the references below already feature the Canadian public broadcaster)

External Links[edit]

Trans Ottawa

replace with WK-link:

Transgender Victoria


Other articles of the topic LGBT : Tammarrian Rogers, Mango (Saturday Night Live), Drag Race Australia, Não Faça Isso Comigo, Johan Paulik, Rio de Janeiro Gay New Year's Eve, Organisations that defend the Catholic Church's official teaching on homosexuality
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References[edit]

  1. "Ottawa LGBT History: The Fight for Trans Rights". The Village Legacy Project | Le Projet de legs du village. Retrieved 2019-06-28.
  2. "Ottawa Trans History". Trans Ottawa. 2018-02-16. Retrieved 2020-01-30.
  3. "Ottawa Trans History". Trans Ottawa. 2018-02-16. Retrieved 2020-01-30. ... the future Gender Mosaic. Unknown parameter |url-status= ignored (help)
  4. Stittsville Centra, Staff writers (2016-08-02). "Stittsville tween activist will marshal Ottawa's Pride Parade". Stittsville Central - Local News, Events and Business. Retrieved 2020-01-30. Unknown parameter |url-status= ignored (help)
  5. 5.0 5.1 "What is Bill C-16 -". Retrieved 2019-06-10.
  6. "Trans Equality Canada Applauds Legislation to Protect Trans Individuals". trans-equality. May 17, 2016. Retrieved 2020-01-30. Unknown parameter |url-status= ignored (help)
  7. Mas, Susana (May 17, 2016). "Transgender Canadians should 'feel free and safe' to be themselves under new Liberal bill". CBC News. Retrieved 2020-01-30. Unknown parameter |url-status= ignored (help)
  8. Hansen, Jackie (May 16, 2017). "The importance of Bill C-16 on Gender Identity: In conversation with violence against women advocate Dillon Black". www.amnesty.ca. Retrieved 2019-06-28.
  9. Legal Team, N/A (May 7, 2010). "BRIEF IN SUPPORT OF BILL C-389, AN ACT TO AMEND THE CANADIAN HUMAN RIGHTS ACT AND THE CRIMINAL CODE (GENDER IDENTITY AND GENDER EXPRESSION)". www.amnesty.ca. Retrieved 2019-07-02.
  10. OpenParliament (2019). "Bill C-16". Retrieved 2020-01-30. Unknown parameter |url-status= ignored (help)
  11. FaceBook (2019-11-20). "Ottawa Trans Day of Remembrance Vigil 2019 (TDoR)". www.facebook.com. Retrieved 2020-01-30. Unknown parameter |url-status= ignored (help)
  12. Capital Extra (2013-05-24). "Gender Mosaic celebrates 25 years". Xtra. Retrieved 2020-01-30. Unknown parameter |url-status= ignored (help)
  13. CHEO (Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario). "CHEO website, Gender Diversity Clinic services". CHEO Gender Diversity Clinic. Retrieved 2020-01-30. Unknown parameter |url-status= ignored (help)
  14. "MN Joins States With Specialized Clinics for Transgender Youth". www.publicnewsservice.org. Retrieved 2020-01-30.


This article "Gender Mosaic" is from Wikipedia. The list of its authors can be seen in its historical and/or the page Edithistory:Gender Mosaic. Articles copied from Draft Namespace on Wikipedia could be seen on the Draft Namespace of Wikipedia and not main one.