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Timeline of young people's rights in France

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  • Around the year 300 CE, 11 or 13-year-old Faith of Agen reportedly[1][2] refused the publican's order to serve the idols. Her hagiographies tell she performed miracles but was executed according to Roman law for her Christianity.
    • Ca. 11th century, the anonymous oldest known work in a Catalan dialect of Old Occitan relates her martyrdom.[2]
  • 1212, 12-year-old Stephen of Cloyes preached, assembled followers and led them on the Kingdom of France's roads.[3][4]
  • Ca. 1490, Anne, heiress of the Duchy of Brittany (born 1477), chose a husband when she was aged 12 or 13.[5]
  • Since at least the time of the Ancien Régime, young people were able and allowed to enlist in the army.[citation needed]
  • Ca. 1523, at the age of 8, Petrus Ramus (born 1515), descendant of an impoverished refugee from Liège, freely left his home in Cuts, Vermandois for Paris, driven by a desire to learn. Aged 12, he enrolled at the College of Navarre.[6]
  • 1537, aged 16 and provided with a large dowry, princess Madeleine of Valois married to become Queen of Scotland. She celebrated for months, but died the same year.[7][8]
  • January 1643,[9] 13-year-old Armand Jean de Vignerot du Plessis, heir and great-nephew of late Cardinal Richelieu, took the oath of office of the Crown dignity of General of the Galleys,[10][11] a rank equivalent to Admiral of the Navy.[12][13]
  • February 1764, Maria Anna Mozart, 13, and her brother Wolfgang Amadeus, 8, were granted 50 louis d'or and a gold snuff box from the royal purse while on their grand tour in Paris.[14]
Joseph Bara (unfinished painting) was 14 when he died for France in 1793.
  • The French Revolution, the République, the SI and the 1804 Napoleonic Code (Code civil des Français) enforce the principles stated in the 1789 Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen. One motto, "Liberté, égalité, fraternité", gradually became the official motto of the French state between 1848[15][16] and 1946.[17][18]
  • August 1870, 15-year-old Arthur Rimbaud from Charleville was locked up for vagrancy.[19] Aged 16, he traveled and slept at the place of his married 27-year-old poet boyfriend Paul Verlaine.
  • 1882, compulsory secular instruction was introduced for all between the age of 6 and 13.[20] Article 4 delegates enforcement to the father.
  • 1977, petition against age of consent laws.
  • On 5 March 2018, Marlène Schiappa, the minister of equality, proposed to set an age of consent for sex, at 15. The future law will set the age below which a person cannot agree to any sexual intercourse at 15.[21] A person below that age will be considered a victim of sexual assault or rape, even if that person calls itself "consenting".[22]
  • From 25 May 2018 on, people under 15 or 16 need parental consent to access social networking services,[23][24] and companies cannot collect the personal data from people under 13.[25][26]

See also[edit]


Others articles of the Topic France : Édouard Cointreau, Social Research and Action Center, Mickael Abbate, Planète Juniors, OnVaSortir!, Marcus Level, Va Bene (L'Algérino song)
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  • Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen, the 1789 Déclaration des droits de l'homme et du citoyen.
  • Universal Declaration of Human Rights, the document adopted in 1948.

References[edit]

  1. Dominique-Marie Dauzet °Praem (2017). "Sainte Foy et l'histoire de Conques" (in French). Prieuré Abbaye Sainte-Foy de Conques. Retrieved 18 March 2018.CS1 maint: Unrecognized language (link)
  2. 2.0 2.1 Unknown. "La Chanson de sainte Foi d'Agen" (in French). Wikisource. Retrieved 18 March 2018.CS1 maint: Unrecognized language (link)
  3. Antony Bridge (1980). The Crusades (illustrated, reprint ed.). London: Panther Books. pp. 234–235. ISBN 0-531-09872-9. Retrieved 16 March 2018. Search this book on Amazon.com Logo.png
  4. George Zabriskie Gray (1870). The Children's Crusade: An Episode of the Thirteenth Century (6 ed.). Boston and New York: Houghton, Mifflin and Company. p. 27. Retrieved 16 March 2018. Search this book on Amazon.com Logo.png
  5. Henry Morley (1871). Clement Marot: Chapter II, Jean Marot. Clement Marot: And Other Studies. 1 (1 ed.). London: Chapman and Hall. p. 27. Retrieved 10 March 2018. Search this book on Amazon.com Logo.png
  6. Pierre Bayle (1702). Dictionnaire Historique et Critique (in French). 3 (2 ed.). Reinier Leers. p. 2550. Retrieved 10 March 2018.CS1 maint: Unrecognized language (link) Search this book on Amazon.com Logo.png
  7. "Madeleine of Valois, Queen of Scotland". Dynasties: The House of Stewart. www.englishmonarchs.co.uk. 2004–2018. Retrieved 18 March 2018.CS1 maint: Date format (link)
  8. Amy Eloise Kelly (15 September 2016). "Madeleine of Valois -The delicate Queen of Scots". The Royal Women: France: France: Claude of France. www.historyofroyalwomen.com. Retrieved 18 March 2018.
  9. Louis Moréri (1759). Claude-Pierre Goujet, Etienne-François Drouet, eds. Le grand dictionnaire historique, ou le melange curieux de l'histoire sacrée et profane (in French). 8. Paris: chez les libraires associés. p. 404. Retrieved 22 March 2018.CS1 maint: Uses editors parameter (link) CS1 maint: Unrecognized language (link) Search this book on Amazon.com Logo.png
  10. Clément Plomteux, Henri Agasse, eds. (1784). Encyclopédie méthodique: Histoire ... Encyclopédie méthodique: Histoire (in French). 6, pt. 2. Liège, Paris: Panckoucke libraire. Retrieved 20 March 2018.CS1 maint: Uses editors parameter (link) CS1 maint: Unrecognized language (link) Search this book on Amazon.com Logo.png
  11. Jean-Baptiste-Pierre-Jullien Courcelles (chevalier de), ed. (1827). Histoire généalogique et héraldique des pairs de france, des grands dignitaires de la couronne, des principales familles nobles du royaume, et des maisons princières de l'Europe, précédée de la généalogie de la maison de France (in French). 8. Paris: chez l'auteur and Arthus Bertrand. p. 359. Retrieved 21 March 2018.CS1 maint: Unrecognized language (link) Search this book on Amazon.com Logo.png
  12. Jean-Baptiste-Pierre-Jullien Courcelles (chevalier de), ed. (1822). Histoire généalogique et héraldique des pairs de France, des grands dignitaires de la Couronne, des principales familles nobles du Royaume, et des maisons princières de l'Europe, précédée de la généalogie de la Maison de France (in French). 1. Paris: chez l'auteur and Arthus Bertrand. p. 43. Retrieved 21 March 2018.CS1 maint: Unrecognized language (link) Search this book on Amazon.com Logo.png
  13. "France: Dignités d'Ancien Régime: Dignités militaires" (in French). Héraldique européenne, Arnaud Bunel. 1997–2011. Retrieved 21 March 2018.CS1 maint: Date format (link) CS1 maint: Unrecognized language (link)
  14. Stanley Sadie (2006). Mozart: The Early Years, 1756–1781. New York: W.W. Norton & Co. p. 49. ISBN 0-393-06112-4. Retrieved 10 March 2018. Search this book on Amazon.com Logo.png
  15. The motto was published for the first time on an official document of the French state, Le Moniteur Universel, in 1848.
  16. Pierre Ancery. "" Liberté, égalité, fraternité " : comment la devise de la France est née" (in French). RetroNews.fr. Retrieved 17 March 2018.CS1 maint: Unrecognized language (link)
  17. The motto was written in the French Constitution for the first time in 1946.
  18. Guy Canivet (May 2011). "La fraternité dans le droit constitutionnel français" (in French). Constitutional Council. Retrieved 17 March 2018.CS1 maint: Unrecognized language (link)
  19. Graham Robb (2000). Rimbaud. W.W. Norton & Co. pp. 46–50. ISBN 0-393-04955-8. Retrieved 11 March 2018. Search this book on Amazon.com Logo.png
  20. "L'histoire des droits de l'enfant" (PDF) (in French). UNICEF France. 2010. Retrieved 9 March 2018.CS1 maint: Unrecognized language (link)
  21. Euan McKirdy (6 March 2018). "France to set age of sexual consent at 15 after rape outcry". CNN. Retrieved 8 March 2018.
  22. "Loi Schiappa : 4 choses à savoir sur la proposition de loi contre les violences sexuelles !". Public.fr. 22 March 2018. Retrieved 22 March 2018.
  23. "Projet de loi relatif à la protection des données personnelles" (in French). Senate. 14 March 2018. Retrieved 16 March 2018.CS1 maint: Unrecognized language (link)
  24. Emilie Gautreau (20 March 2018). "Expliquez-nous... Le règlement européen sur la protection des données personnelles" (in French). France Info. Retrieved 20 March 2018.CS1 maint: Unrecognized language (link)
  25. "Ce qu'il faut retenir du projet de loi sur la protection des données personnelles" (in French). La Tribune. 14 February 2018. Retrieved 16 March 2018.CS1 maint: Unrecognized language (link)
  26. On 21 March, the French Senate adopted the law, mandated by the European Union's 2016 Data Protection Directive. It is now in a resolving committee before being finalised and adopted.


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