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Bielicky Michael

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Bielicky Michael
Born(1954-01-12)12 January 1954
Prague, Czech Republic
🏳️ NationalityGerman
🏫 EducationAcademy of Fine Arts Prague,
Kunstakademie Düsseldorf
💼 Occupation
New media art, Video art, performance, installation art

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Michael Bielicky (* 12. January 1954 in Prague) is a Czech-German media artist. He is professor at the department of digital media at the University of Arts and Design (HfG) / Center for Art and Media Karlsruhe (ZKM) in Karlsruhe. His work Menora/Inventur is the first ever acquired work by the Center for Art and Media Karlsruhe in its' founding year of 1989 by its' founder Heinrich Klotz.[1] The Center for Art and Media Karlsruhe is the first museum worldwide to focus on media exhibitions since it's founding year.

Early Life[edit]

Michael Bielicky spent his childhood in Czechoslovakia and emigrated with his parents to Düsseldorf, Germany in 1969. He studied medicine from 1975 to 1978. He lives in New York from 1980 to 1981 and experiments with photography. Michael Bielicky returns to Germany in 1981 and works for Monochrom Magazine from 1981 to 1989. He studies at the Kunstakademie Düsseldorf from 1984 to 1989, initially with Bernd Becher, soon changes disciplines to study with Nam June Paik, graduating with excellence in 1989 (Meisterschüler: Master Disciple) and works as his assistant after his graduation until 1991.[2]

Works: In Between Video and Media Installations[edit]

In 1986 »Perpetuum Mobile«[3] was one of Michael Bielicky’s first video works produced in Düsseldorf. Bielicky tried to reinvent his artistic practice along every major technical cornerstone, starting with Stop Motion, via U-Matic, Time base correction with DOC (Drop-out compensator) to GPS, the Internet and real time data and provoked and documented the aesthetic errors of the specter in the machine, in parallel and in contradiction to the on-going technical refinement process of the media industry.

In the 1980s he developed techniques to creatively misuse the first digital video editing machines to alter, distort and rearrange his video material, akin to his mentor Nam June Paik's debut exhibition in 1963, where Paik used magnets to distort his own television-set-based exhibits. Works like Four Seasons[4] (1984), Circulus Viciosus (1985) and Paik-Hat (1986) are disturbing linear narrative traditions through cutting techniques and stop motion alone, whereas Perpetuum Mobile[5][6] (1986), Next Year in Jerusalem[7][8] (1988) and Golem is Alive[9] [10] (1989) introduce digital editing techniques to create videos, that appear to be haunted by the specters of early East European media culture. In 1989, the same year Golem is Alive is released, Michael Bielicky expands the two-dimensional screen into the exhibition space. With his Menorah/Inventur[11] (1989) he makes the screen-frames disappear and dissolve in a symbolically powerful sculpture, one of the main symbols of Jewish religion.[12] One year later, in 1990, he does away with the religious symbolism and houses his videos in the most universal scientific and technical symbol, the spiral:

"One can walk through the spiral like through a tunnel. At the end oft hat tunnel is a black sphere (the somewhere). A small TV transmitter transmits the information (in the form of a flame) to the carrier, the spiral, and the receivers (TVs). Information always moves through time and space in the same form. It always has the form of the spiral. The sounds of human language move through space in the same way as our solar system moves through the universe. We store information on a computer disc in a sprial form, as we do on a videotape.[13]

The Name (1990),[14][15] which is technically akin to Menorah/Inventur (the small televisions are receivers for a video source nearby, fire and screens are intertwined as a symbol of and a mean of communication), is the perfect balance of technical expertise and historic cultural mystery. Bielicky unmasks technology as one Metanarrative among many.

In 1987 Bielicky examines the destruction of Joseph Beuys's Fettecke (Fat Corner) in collaboration with Ricardo Peredo Wende. The resulting documentary video sculpture is a who is who of Beuys's students and disciples, as well as a cascade of partly absurd, partly fascinating explanations, why and how this case of a janitor's utter ignorance for art has implications for the future of art as a whole.[16][17]

In an unique and again technologically pioneering project, Bielicky sets out to inscribe the biblical Exodus route into the prototype of what we all have come to know as the internet. Calling it a tele-performance in 1995, Bielicky and al. - equipped with a Jeep stacked with high-end technology - set out to track the Exodus route in the Negev desert, collecting GPS data and storing it on one of the first websites as they go.[18] That project, at the very junction of religion and narrative technology, marks a pivoting point in Bielicky's work. Technology is not haunted by specters anymore, the equilibrium reached with The Name (1990) tips in favor of technology: Bielicky traces the biblical history of Jewish culture scientifically.

In 1994 he begins to experiment with GPS in an art context: his work Intelligent Mailman (1994) is the first of it's kind worldwide and marks the onset of numerous foundational research projects on interactive media art (see: Works: Proceedings and Foundations).

Since 2005 - in cooperation with Kamila B. Richter - Bielicky develops web based, often interactive projects, controlled by real time data fed from the Internet. Market and stock exchange data, news, Twitter and many other data streams guide their animated stories - often in an uncanny and counterintuitive way. This work series can be described by four major set ups: The earliest two web based projects with Kamila B. Richter are Columbus 2.0 and Falling Life/Times (with a predecessor called Falling Stars). Columbus 2.0 was displayed in Wuhan (2007), Sevilla[19] (2008), and Thessaloniki (2011), whereas Falling Life/Times was displayed in Barcelona (2007), Sao Paulo (2008) and New York (2008).

The more complex, later two web based projects with Kamila B. Richter are The Garden of Error and Decay and the Why Don't We series. The Garden of Error and Decay series takes the text-to-pictogram-converter-algorithms of Falling Times and accompanies it's generated pictograms with the texts that generated them on screen - in a Garden Eden kind of backdrop. Adding the wave-animations of Columbus 2.0 and it's interactive approach, the Garden of Error and Decay series engulfs the exhibition visitor in an information environment ruled by skeletons, warlords and explosions, with the option to stop ("shoot") a pictogram with the joystick mounted in front of the projection: a desperate attempt to lessen it's impact on the world of information (it is displayed smaller if successfully hit). Nevertheless there is a meta information feed overriding all the mentioned interaction and aggregation algorithms at work. This meta information feed is that of the NY stock exchange and influences the dimensions the messages and pictograms are displayed in a far greater way, to a point where the interaction of the visitor does not count at all.[20][21] The Garden of Error and Decay was displayed in Wuhan (2009), Moscow (2011), Vienna (2011), Vienna (2012), Seoul[22] (2013) and Karlsruhe (2013).

The Why Don't We series takes a slightly different approach to web influenced narratives. The narrative is not endless and pluralistic, displaying many social media messages in parallel, but picks one message, displays it for the visitor to see and tells a short story in automatically generated pictograms, until the next digital (news) text is displayed and the next narrative is visualized.[23][24] Why Don't We was displayed in Vienna (2013), Berlin (2013) and Bad Rothenfelde (2014, 2017).

In 2015 Michael Bielicky and Kamila B. Richter used their narration algorithms to project a self-similar, compartmentalized, endless, dense and orchestra controlled narrative of pictograms which not only uncannily felt at home on the scanaefrons, behind the theatre stage, but even were the only protagonist and pivotal part of the piece. Appropriately called Lost Objects[25] the Opera was displayed at the National Theatre Prague.

Recently Michael Bielicky and Kamila B. Richter increasingly follow invitations to provide solo exhibitions and bring their series together in multitudes of walls and spaces. Stemming from the Lost Objects experience in the Opera House, all four series are brought together in an self-similar, compartmentalized, endless, dense and visitor-controlled manner. Here not the pictograms and their intricate interaction are the main protagonists, but the wandering visitors, who stride through the cut up, translucent and three-dimensionally hung projection canvases, over and over covered with pictograms and texts, and become pictograms themselves. Michael Bielicky and Kamila B. Richter had solo exhibits at Strasbourg (2016)[26][27] and Havana[28] (2017).

Works: Proceedings and Foundations[edit]

Bielicky returns to Prague from 1991 to 2006 to found the School of Media Arts at the Academy of Fine Arts (AVU). In addition to his AVU position, he works closely with the Goethe Institute Prague and – beginning in the early 1990s - organises several symposia in honour of the famous, also Prague born philosopher and photography theoretician Vilém Flusser. He has been advisor in culture and technology to the Soros Centre for Contemporary Art trough Eastern Europe from Bucharest, Odessa, and Moscow to Alma-Ata in Kazakhstan, to the Council of Europe in Strasbourg, and to Chiang Mai University in Thailand where he is involved in establishing a new Media Arts Department. From the mid-1990s on, Bielicky leads foundational research programs at the ZKM Centre for Art and Media in Karlsruhe: an interactive 360° environment, named Delvaux’s Dream (1998-99), and a project for Volkswagen in the Autostadt Wolfsburg named Room with a View (2000).[29] In 1996 he has been the co-founder of the Institute of Unstable Thoughts in Kiev, Ukraine. Michael Bielicky cooperates with the High Tech Centre Babelsberg in Potsdam in 1997. From 1999-2000 Bielicky establishes a research program on interactive 360° environment prototypes at the ZKM Centre for Art and Media in Karlsruhe, as well as - from 1999 to 2001 - the Virtual Set Project, which builds on the former.

Since 2006 Michael Bielicky is the Professor of New Media at the Karlsruhe University of Arts and Design.

Exhibitions[edit]

Bielicky's first exhibition was held in 1988 at the Cité Internationale des Arts Paris, in the grand glass front gallery reserved for scholars on the second floor 18 Rue de l'Hôtel de ville, Paris, France. A retrospective of Bielicky's work in collaboration with Kamila B. Richter was held at the Centro de Arte Contemporáneo Wifredo Lam in Havana, Cuba. The first major retrospective of his work is organized by the Centre of Media and Arts (ZKM) Karlsruhe and scheduled for summer 2018.

In 1991, an exhibition centered on Bielicky's video sculpture The Name (1990) opened at the Montevideo Gallery in Amsterdam, Netherlands.

Bielicky's work also appeared in important group exhibitions such as São Paulo Biennale (1987), Videonale (1988, 1990, 1992), Multimediale 2 (1991), Ars Electronica (1992, 1994, 1995), Global Contemporary (2011), Havana Biennale (2012) and Globale (2015).

Honours and awards[edit]

  • 1988 Cité Internationale des Arts de Paris Scholarship
  • 1999–2000: Guest artist at the Institute for Visual Media at ZKM Karlsruhe

Further Reading[edit]

Michael Bielicky's texts (selection)

  • Michael Bielicky, Keiko Sei. Die Letzten Tage (The Last Days). In: Friedemann Malsch (Ed.). Parallele Kunst - Ein Rückblick auf die 80er Jahre. Köln, Kunstforum international, Band 117. 1992. pp. 75-76.
  • Alena Kucerova, Michael Bielicky. Od Videoartu k interaktivnim umenim. (Interview). In: Alena Kucerova (Ed.). Video + Film (monthly Jounral). Prague, Informacni a poradenske stredisko pro mistni kulturu. 1993.
  • Michael Bielicky. Big Sleep, 1993. In: Klaus Bußmann (Ed.). Nam June Paik, eine data base: la Biennale di Venezia, XLV Esposizione Internazionale d'Arte. Stuttgart. Ed. Cantz, 1993. S. 148B. ISBN 9783893225736 Search this book on Amazon.com Logo.png.
  • Michael Bielicky. Der Weg ins Immaterielle. In: Susanne Rennert, Stephan von Wiese (Hrsg.). Students of Paik: 1978 – 95, video dreams. Düsseldorf, Kunstmuseum im Ehrenhof. 1996. S. 22ff.
  • Michael Bielicky. Time-Space-Nothing. In: Susanne Rennert, Stephan von Wiese (Hrsg.). Students of Paik: 1978 – 95, video dreams. Düsseldorf, Kunstmuseum im Ehrenhof. 1996. S. 22ff.
  • Michael Bielicky. On Spaceless Space. In: Raymond Weber, Vaclav Havel (Eds.). Conference on A New Space for Culture and Society: 19. – 23- November 1996. Council of Europe, Strasbourg. 1996. p. 16.
  • Michael Bielicky. Hypertext. In: Olga Shishko, Irina Alpatova (Eds.). NewMediaLogia - NewMediaTopia (lecture series). Moskau, Soros Center for Contemporary Arts. 1996. pp. 171ff.
  • Michael Bielicky. Die Fotografie hat längst ihre Zweidimensionalität verloren. In: Tamara Horakova, Ewald Maurer, Johanna Hofleitner, Ruth Maurer-Horak (Eds.). Image: /images: Positionen zur zeitgenössischen Fotografie. Wien, Passagen Verlag. 2002. pp. 277ff. ISBN 385165515X Search this book on Amazon.com Logo.png.
  • Michael Bielicky. Unsere „zionistischen Ideen“. In: Signe Rossbach (Ed.). So einfach war das: jüdische Kindheiten und Jugend seit 1945 in Österreich, der Schweiz und Deutschland; eine Ausstellung des Jüdischen Museums Hohenems in Zusammenarbeit mit dem Jüdischen Museum Berlin. Hohenems, Jüdisches Museum. 2002. pp. 22-24. ISBN 383217818X Search this book on Amazon.com Logo.png..
  • Michael Bielicky: Nam June Paik In-Between. In: Nam June Paik & Media Art: Proceedings of MAC2002. Seoul, Yonsei University. 2002. pp. 65-67.
  • Michael Bielicky. Obrazy ztratily dvourozmernost (The Images lost their Two-Dimensionality). In: Sebastian Pawlowski (Ed.). Tyden – Komunisti mezi námi (Journal). Prag, Mediacop s.r.p.. 9/2003.
  • Michael Bielicky. Prague - A Place of Illusionists. In: Jeffrey Shaw, Peter Weibel (Eds.). Future cinema: the cinematic imaginary after film. Cambridge, MIT Press. 2003. Pp. 96-101.
  • Michael Bielicky. Media Golem: Between Prague and ZKM. In: Mel Alexenberg (Ed.). Educating Artists for the Future: Learning at the Intersections of Art, Science, Technology and Culture. University of Chicago Press. 2008 pp. 193ff., p. 238. ISBN 3211827099 Search this book on Amazon.com Logo.png.
  • Michael Bielicky. Praga Magica. In: Jens Lutz, Miriam Stürner, Daria Mille-Rassokhina, Judith Bihr, Anett Holzheid (Eds.). Art in Europe 1945 - 1968: the Continent that the EU does not know. Supplement to the exhibition catalogue. Karlsruhe, ZKM. 2016. pp. 29-31.
  • Michael Bielicky, Clemens Jahn, Matteo Pasquinelli. Die Identitätsfrage: Künstler/in oder Theoretiker/in? – Ein Gespräch. In: Clemens Jahn (Ed.). Jahresbericht der Staatlichen Hochschule für Gestaltung Karlsruhe 2015-2016/The Karlsruhe University of Arts and Design Annual Report 2015-2016. Karlsruhe, Staatliche Hochschule für Gestaltung. 2017. pp. 157-172. ISBN 9783930194216 Search this book on Amazon.com Logo.png.

Interviews (selection)

  • Lubor Benda, Michael Bielicky. Mezi Botticellim A Teslou (In between Botticelli and Tesla, Interview). In: Dalibor Kubik, Ivan Adamovic (Eds.). Zivel Cislo 9 (Journal). Prag, IMEDIA s.r.o.. 04/1998. pp. 34-37.
  • Pepe Rojo, Michael Bielicky. Movimiento Perpetuo (Perpetuum Mobile, Interview). In: Norma Lazo (Ed.) Complot 69 – Arte y Tecnología. . 10/2002.

Group and Solo Exhibition catalogues (selection)

  • Axel Klepsch (Ed.), Vilém Flusser, Nam June Paik (Authors). Discover European Video: Anthology Film Archives, New York November 17-November 25, 1990. Düsseldorf, 1990. p. 11, 46.
  • Ginette Major (Ed.). Images du futur '91: 31 mai - 22 septembre, cité des arts et des Nouvelles technologies de Montréal. 1991. p. 18.
  • Karl Gerbel, Peter Weibel (Eds.). Die Welt von innen, Endo & Nano (Ars Electronica 92). Linz, Veritas-Verlag. 1992. pp. 126 ff. ISBN 3901196048 Search this book on Amazon.com Logo.png.
  • Pavel Scheufler, Raduz Cincera, Jaroslav Vancat (Eds.). The Czech Electronic Picture: The Inner Scources/Cesky Obraz Elektronicky: vnitrni zdroje. Mánes Praha. 1994.
  • Susanne Rennert, Stephan von Wiese (Eds.). Students of Paik: 1978 – 95, video dreams (mixed pixels). Düsseldorf, Kunstmuseum im Ehrenhof. 1996. pp. 22ff und p. 132.

References[edit]

  1. Heinrich Klotz, Ursula Anna Frohne (Eds). Kunst der Gegenwart (Exhibition on occasion of the 1997 Grand Opening of the ZKM, Centre for Media and Arts in Karlsruhe). Munich, New York, Prestel. 1997. pp. 54–55. ISBN 3791318357 Search this book on Amazon.com Logo.png..
  2. Susanne Rennert, Stephan von Wiese (Hrsg.). Students of Paik: 1978 – 95, video dreams. Düsseldorf, Kunstmuseum im Ehrenhof. 1996. S. 22ff und S. 132.
  3. MedienOperative (Hrsg.), Micky Kwella, Jörg Himstedt (Rd.). VideoFilmFest ’88 des 18. Internationalen Forums des jungen Films. Berlin, Internationales Forum des jungen Films. 1988. S. 19.
  4. Michael Bielicky – Four Seasons. LIMA website. Retrieved 27. Juni 2017.
  5. MedienOperative (Hrsg.), Micky Kwella, Jörg Himstedt (Rd.). VideoFilmFest ’88 des 18. Internationalen Forums des jungen Films. Berlin, Internationales Forum des jungen Films. 1988. S. 19.
  6. Michael Bielicky – Perpetuum Mobile. LIMA website. Retrieved 27. Juni 2017.
  7. Petra Unnützer (Hg.). 3. Videonale : 11. - 16.9.1988. Bonn, Videonale. 1988. S. 53.
  8. Michael Bielicky - Next Year in Jerusalem. LIMA website. Retrieved 27. Juni 2017.
  9. Dario Ghanai. Videonale 5. Bonn, Videonale. 1992. S.110.
  10. Michael Bielicky - Golem Is Alive. LIMA website. Retrieved 27. Juni 2017.
  11. Karl Gerbel, Peter Weibel (Hrsg.). Die Welt von innen, Endo & Nano (Ars Electronica 92). Linz, Veritas-Verlag. 1992. S. 126 ff.
  12. Jennifer Hansen-Glucklich. Holocaust memory reframed: museums and the challenges of representation. New Brunswick, NJ, Rutgers University Press. 2014. pp. 178-180. ISBN 9780813563237 Search this book on Amazon.com Logo.png..
  13. Ginette Major (Ed.). Images du futur '91: 31 mai - 22 septembre, cité des arts et des Nouvelles technologies de Montréal. 1991. p. 18.
  14. Axel Klepsch (Hg), Vilém Flusser, Nam June Paik (Autors). Discover European Video: Anthology Film Archives, New York November 17-November 25, 1990. Düsseldorf, 1990. S. 11, 46.
  15. Wendelin Renn (Hg.). "Schirm-Herrschaft" Video Kunst: 27. Juni bis 25. Juli 1993, Städtische Galerie Lovis-Kabinett Villingen-Schwenningen. Villingen-Schwenningen [u.a.], Städtische Galerie [u.a.]. 1993. S. 16.
  16. Freunde der Deutschen Kinemathek e.V. (Ulrich Gregor, Peter B. Schumann) (Hrsg.). 17. Internationales Forum des jungen Films. Berlin, Felgentreff & Goebel. 1987. S. 58.
  17. Christoph Blase (Hg.). 40jahrevideokunst.de - Teil 2. Ostfildern, Hatje Cantz. 2010. S. 86 ff, 411 ff.
  18. Karl Gerbel, Peter Weibel. (Ed.): Exhibition Catalogue: Ars Electronica 95: Mythos Information. Welcome to the Wired World. Springer, Vienna. 1995. pp. 214 ff. ISBN 9783791318691 Search this book on Amazon.com Logo.png.
  19. Davina Jackson. SuperLux, Smart Light Art, Design & Architecture for Cities. Thames & Hudson. 2015. pp. 92 ff. ISBN 9780500343043 Search this book on Amazon.com Logo.png.
  20. Nikolai Molok, Peter Weibel. (Hrsg.) 4th Moscow biennale of contemporary art : 23.09.2011 - 30.10.2011. Moscow, Institute of Contemporary Art. 2011. S. 45 ff.
  21. Hans Belting, Andrea Buddensieg, Peter Weibel (Hrsg.). The global contemporary and the rise of new art worlds. Cambridge, MIT Press. 2013. S. 328 ff.
  22. Michael Bielicky - Garden of Error and Decay. Official Vimeo. Retrieved 27. Juni 2017.
  23. Manfred Schneckenburger (Hg.), Lichtsicht die vierte: Projektions-Biennale Bad Rothenfelde, 27. September 2013 bis 5. Januar 2014. Bönen, Kettler. 2013. S. 28 ff.
  24. Lichtsicht gGmbH (Hrsg.), Lichtsicht die Vierte: Projektions-Biennale Bad Rothenfelde, 29. September 2017 bis 28. Januar 2018. Bönen, Kettler. 2017. S. 22 ff.
  25. Michael Bielicky - Lost Objects. Official Prague National Theatre Site. Retrieved 14. August 2017.
  26. Dimitri Konstantinidis. e.city Prague 2016. Strasbourg, Apollonia. pp. 38-51. ISBN 9782918640059 Search this book on Amazon.com Logo.png..
  27. Michael Bielicky - Lost. Official Vimeo. Retrieved 27. Juni 2017.
  28. Michael Bielicky - Lost. Official Vimeo. Retrieved 27. Juni 2017.
  29. Hannes Leopoldseder, Christine Schöpf (Eds.). Cyberarts 2000: International Compendium Prix Ars Electronica. Springer. 2000. Pp. 88-89. ISBN 3211834982 Search this book on Amazon.com Logo.png.

External links[edit]

{{personal details |NAME=Bielický, Michael |ALTERNATIVNAMEN=Bielicky, Michael |KURZBESCHREIBUNG=tschechisch-deutscher Medienkünstler |GEBURTSDATUM=12. Januar 1954 |GEBURTSORT=[[Prag]] |STERBEDATUM= |STERBEORT= }}


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