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Dave Hamilton

From EverybodyWiki Bios & Wiki

Dave Hamilton
BornDavid John Hamilton
1974 (age 49–50)
Northampton, England
💼 Occupation
Writer, journalist
🥚 TwitterTwitter=
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David John Hamilton (born 1974) British author, journalist, gardener and wild food forager.[1][2][3]Born in Northampton he now lives in Frome, Somerset.

Hamilton and his brother Andy, with whom he co-edited The Self-Sufficient-ish Bible, are known for the foraging walks they lead in Castle Park, Bristol,[4] and in other parts of Britain.[3] Hamilton traces his interest in food to becoming a vergetarian at age 10.[3][5]

Books[edit]

Family Foraging[edit]

Published under his full name David Hamilton (used for children's books). Family Foraging examines 30 edible plants commonly found in the Northern Hemisphere. It shows you how you how to identify them safely and gather them to make delicious recipes that are easy to create and tempting and nutritious for young children.

It was translated into French, Dutch and Danish and a US edition was produced by Roost Books[6]

Wild Ruins BC[edit]

In Wild Ruins, BC (2019) Hamilton explores Britain's stone circles, sacred tombs, Iron Age hillforts, and the caves and Bronze Age brochs.[7]

Wild Ruins[edit]

In Wild Ruins (2015) Hamilton explores Britain's lesser known ruined castles, abbyes, and houses.[8][9][10] copies.

Grow your Food For Free[edit]

Green Books April 2011

The award-winning 'Grow your food for free ...well almost', a guide to growing vegetables and garden DIY using recycled materials.[11]

The Self-Sufficient-ish Bible[edit]

The Self-Sufficient-ish Bible was published by Hodder and Stoughton in 2008.

Dave's writing career started after his experiments in urban self-sufficiency whilst studying for a BSc in Nutrition and Food Science at Oxford Brookes. These experiments led to his first book 'The Self Sufficient-ish Bible: An Eco-living Guide for the 21st Century (ISBN 978-0340951026 Search this book on .).

Other work[edit]

Historically Hamilton and his twin brother Andy ran a website called Selfsufficientish. Although some of their work remains on the site neither have had anything to do with its administration for years.

His diverse interests are reflected in his diverse writing; he has written for BBC History, Countryfile, Country Walking, Gardener's World magazine, the Guardian Weekend[12] and Grow your Own.

References[edit]

  1. Wildaboutplants.org
  2. The Guardian
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 "Foraging for free food on your doorstep: Emma Dance meets professional forager and writer Dave Hamilton who will be leading Wild Walks at the Flavours of the West festival at Milsom Place". Bath Chronicle. 20 June 2013.
  4. "Go foraging for your lunch: Wild food; Andy Hamilton has gained a national reputation for his foraging walks in Bristol". Bristol Post. 2 April 2011.
  5. Adharanand, Finn (28 November 2009). "Food hunters of the urban jungle". The Guardian. Retrieved 5 May 2019.
  6. "Roost Books". www.roostbooks.com. Retrieved 2019-02-21.
  7. Carter, Hana (1 March 2019). "sacred tombs and caves, stone circles, Bronze Age brochs and Iron Age hillforts". The Sun. Retrieved 5 May 2019.
  8. Chalis, Carla (11 July 2015). "Churches, castles and forgotten factories: 7 of Britain's most amazing ruins". BT. Retrieved 5 May 2019.
  9. Jones, Hannah (8 January 2015). "13 incredible Welsh ruins frozen in time forever". Wales Online. Retrieved 5 May 2019.
  10. "Book reveals 250 breathtaking hidden wonders right on our doorstep". Mail Online. 8 June 2015. Retrieved 21 February 2019.
  11. Pearson, Louisa (30 July 2011). "Dig Deep (book review)". The Scotsman.
  12. Hamilton, Dave (8 June 2012). "Gardens: sharp practices to encourage hedgehogs". The Guardian. Retrieved 21 February 2019.


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