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Dean Lomax

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Dean R. Lomax
File:Dean at the Stuttgart State Museum of Natural History, Germany.jpg
Dean Lomax in 2017 beside skeletons of Stenopterygius
ResidenceEngland
NationalityBritish
Alma materUniversity of Manchester
Known forIchthyosaurs, Dinosaurs of the British Isles, and Dinosaur Britain
Scientific career
FieldsPalaeontologist

Dean R. Lomax is a British palaeontologist, author and science communicator in Britain. He grew up in Doncaster, South Yorkshire, England. He is a visiting scientist at The University of Manchester.

Research[edit | edit source]

Lomax's research ranges from trace fossils to fossil plants and he has published extensively for both academic and popular audiences. His expertise is on ichthyosaurs and he has named several new species, including species of Ichthyosaurus (Ichthyosaurus anningae, named after Mary Anning [2015],[1][2] Ichthyosaurus larkini and Ichthyosaurus somersetensis [2016])[3] Protoichthyosaurus (Protoichthyosaurus applebyi [2017])[4] and named the leptonectid ichthyosaur genus Wahlisaurus (Wahlisaurus massarae [2016]).[5][6] He has also described what might be the largest ichthyosaur (or animal) that ever lived.[7][8] Other notable discoveries made by Lomax include the world's longest 'death track' (mortichnia), a 9.7 m trackway from Solnhofen created by a 150 million-year-old horseshoe crab,[9][10][11] the discovery of a new fossil lagerstätten site in Lomax's hometown of Doncaster, England, the identification and discovery of an 8.5 m ammonite death drag,[12][13] an ichthyosaur pregnant with octuplets[14], the discovery of the largest Ichthyosaurus with preserved fetus[15] and the first baby ichthyosaur found with its last meal preserved.[16]

He is the author of several books, including Dinosaurs of the British Isles.[17][18][19]

Awards[edit | edit source]

In 2015, Lomax won the G. J. Mendel Award (gold medal) for excellence in science at the Houses of Parliament.[20]

He was awarded the Marsh Award for Palaeontology from the Marsh Christian Trust and Natural History Museum, London in 2015 for his significant contributions to palaeontology.[21]

Lomax was also awarded the Palaeontographical Society Edward Forbes Prize[22] for his identification and formal recognition of Ichthyosaurus anningae, specifically for recognising the specimen as genuine after being misidentified as a plaster cast.[23]

He was recognised as a local science hero by the Royal Society in 2016.[24][25]

He was named one of Junior Chamber International UK’s Ten Outstanding Young Persons of 2017.[26]

References[edit | edit source]

  1. Gill, Victoria (19 February 2015). "Forgotten fossil found to be new species of ichthyosaur". BBC.
  2. "'Fake' fossil is actually 189 million-year-old remains of undiscovered species". foxnews.com. 24 February 2015.
  3. Briggs, Helen (6 October 2016). "British 'sea dragon' fossils are 'new to science'". BBC.
  4. Naish, Darren (10 October 2017). "The Fall and Rise of Protoichthyosaurus". Scientific American Tetrapod Zoology.
  5. "200 million-year-old fossil of rare Jurassic-era 'sea dragon' was found hidden in private collection". phys.org.
  6. Ashok, India. "New 200 million-year-old British species of marine reptile discovered". InternationalBusinessTimes.
  7. Pickrell, John (9 April 2018). "Prehistoric 'Sea Monster' May Be Largest That Ever Lived". nationalgeographic.com.
  8. Briggs, Helen (10 April 2018). "Ancient sea reptile was one of the largest animals ever". nationalgeographic.com.
  9. Crumpton, Nick (7 September 2012). "Fossil records 'crab' death march". bbc.co.uk.
  10. Tennant, Jon (12 June 2017). "Meet Dean Lomax, Master of the Prehistoric 'Death March'". discovermagazine.com.
  11. Prostak, Sergio (30 August 2012). "Stunning Discovery: World's Longest Fossilized 'Death Track'". sci-news.com.
  12. Panciroli, Elsa (11 May 2017). "Zombie ammonite discovery is 'snapshot of an unusual moment in deep time'". theguardian.com.
  13. Briggs, Helen (8 May 2017). "Rare ammonite 'death drag' fossil discovered". bbc.co.uk.
  14. "Fossilized 'Sea Monster' Found Pregnant With Eight Babies". Smithsonian.com. 9 April 2018.
  15. "Biggest Ichthyosaurus Fossil Was Pregnant When She Died". iflscience.com. 15 September 2014.
  16. Becker, Rachel. "This 200-million-year-old baby ichthyosaur died with a belly full of squid". theverge.com.
  17. Walley, Mike. ""Dinosaurs of the British Isles" Book Review". everythingdinosaur.co.uk.
  18. Roberts, Edward. ""Britain was a 'dinosaur paradise' with more than 100 different species, author of new book claims". mirror.co.uk.
  19. Switek, Brian. ""Book in Brief: Dinosaurs of the British Isles". nationalgeographic.com.
  20. "STEM for BRITAIN - Early-career research scientists, engineers and mathematicians". www.setforbritain.org.uk.
  21. "Marsh Palaeontology Award - Natural History Museum". marshchristiantrust.org.
  22. "Honorary Scientist at The University of Manchester Wins Award". everythingdinosaur.co.uk.
  23. "Fossil 'replica' found to be unknown species of dinosaur". itv.com.
  24. "Dean R. Lomax – Making dreams reality". royalsociety.org.
  25. McLennan, Matt. "Doncaster to celebrate the work of scientist Dean Lomax with exhibition and fun day". doncaster free press.
  26. Hawley, Ben. ""National Convention T.O.Y.P awards ceremony: Meet some of our inspiring winners!". jciuk.org.uk.

External links[edit | edit source]


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