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George Campbell

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George Campbell
Rev George Campbell Jubilee (unknown newspaper).jpg Rev George Campbell Jubilee (unknown newspaper).jpg
Born(1827-09-09)9 September 1827
Traquair, Peeblesshire, Scotland
💀Died30 April 1904(1904-04-30) (aged 76)
Eastwood, Renfrewshire, Scotland30 April 1904(1904-04-30) (aged 76)
🏳️ Nationality
💼 Occupation
minister, writer
👩 Spouse(s)Euphemia Harriet Drummond Graham
👶 ChildrenVery Rev James Montgomery Campbell and 11 others


Other articles of the topic Scotland : United Kingdom, The United Kingdom, Maxwell James Wright, George Hutchison (moderator), Stirling Highland Games, Scottish Young Labour, ECLID
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Rev George Campbell (1827-1904), parish minister of Eastwood, Glasgow, was a Scottish clergyman. His father was Rev James Campbell (1792-1861), parish minister of Traquair, and his son, Very Rev James Montgomery Campbell, served as Moderator of the General Assembly of the Church of Scotland in 1928.[1][2] George Campbell was privately educated, after which he attended Edinburgh University. During his youth on Tweedside, he was at Abbotsford whilst Sir Walter Scott was still alive, although the two never met since Scott was on the Continent at the time. Like his father, whose legacy of letters from mainland Europe have now been digitised, Campbell travelled extensively as a student on the Continent and during the early years of his ministry. This included a trip to Russia along with the Rev Dr Norman Macleod.[3]

Career[edit]

After a "distinguished career" at the University of Edinburgh, Campbell went to Rosneath as an assistant clergyman to Rev Robert Story, the father of the Principal of Glasgow University, and in that parish was the driving force behind the erection of a chapel at Craigrownie which later functioned as a parish church.[4] In 1853 he was ordained to Eastwood, the parish he served for more than five decades until his death. In his time a new manse, church, and parish school were erected.[5][6] At his induction, Sir John and Lady Matilda Maxwell, George Campbell's patrons, treated him to a "sumptuous banquet" at the Star Hotel, Glasgow, in the presence of numerous clergymen, the service having been conducted by the Rev Andrew Watson of the Abbey, Paisley.[7]

Months after his induction, Campbell advertised for a parish schoolmaster for the growing district, "competent to teach all the branches of an English Education, together with Latin and Greek, and at least one Modern Language." A "maximum Salary" was offered for the strenuous position, to which were added duties as the parish's Session Clerk.[8]

In 1855, not long after he had started out as a minister, thieves forcibly broke into Eastwood manse and stole a large amount of silver plate and other items, including silver sacramental cups belonging to the church.[9]

In 1865, Campbell was a co-founder of the Church Service Society, whose purpose it was to study the liturgies of the Christian church and to prepare and publish forms of prayer for public worship and services for the administration of the sacraments in the Church of Scotland, and its members included high-ranking Scottish clergymen. Rev Campbell was the society's treasurer.[10] [11] From 1868 to 1888 he was clerk of Presbytery in Paisley[12] This demanding duty involved mediating in controversial cases, such as when a zealous minister complained bitterly that a Roman Catholic school was using books of "decidedly Popish character, containing passages of a kind grossly idolatrous, with superstitions historically false, most revolting to the feelings and principles of Protestants, and strongly calculated to prejudice and mislead the infant mind...".[13] During Campbell's ministry, the parish, on the outskirts of Glasgow, grew significantly. Through his energy, several chapels were erected and endowed in Pollokshaws and surroundings.[14] He was active on all public Boards in the parish[15], and greatly encouraged education via the School Board.[16]

Shortly before Rev Campbell's death, in 1903, a dinner was given at Windsor Hall, Glasgow, to celebrate the long-standing minister's jubilee, presided by Dr Robert Stirling Maxwell, MP, and attended, inter alia, by the eminent principal of Glasgow university, Robert Herbert Story, whose father Robert had been parish minister of Rosneath in the period when Campbell had been an assistant prior to his ordination [17], and the Right Rev John Gillespie (moderator), who said it was “gratifying to find a better spirit prevailing among the different churches compared with the time when their guest was ordained.” Also present was the liturgical scholar Thomas Leishman, of the Church Service Society.[18] At a congregational “conversatione” in Pollokshaws in connection with the jubilee, Rev Campbell was presented with a silver salver and a cheque for £500.[19]

Parish History[edit]

Rev George Campbell is known for his contribution to the parish history of the corner of Glasgow where he spent fifty-one years of his life. The title of his book, Eastwood: notes on the ecclesiastical antiquities of the parish, is confusing insofar as it is mainly a history of the area, named after long-since-vanished wood, from early Celtic Christianisation until the 19th century, and less about the relics and ancient monuments we normally associate with the term “antiquities”. Although these artefacts are mentioned, too, most of the book constitutes a tribute to the many clergymen who served the district over the centuries. Using sources such as Kirk Session records, Campbell does not hesitate to mention negative aspects of Christianity such as stories of witches and the ensuing trials and hangings. As someone who lived in a period when people of modest origin, like Campbell’s minister father James before him, were dependent, beside the Kirk, on the support of baronets if they wanted to enter the ministry, and in doing so, become respected middle class citizens, Campbell does not forget to pay homage to his patrons Sir John and Lady Matilda Maxwell. As a token of appreciation, he tactfully describes in detail the contribution the Maxwell family made to the Pollok/Eastwood district.[20] When Sir John Maxwell of Pollok died in 1865, Rev Campbell held the Presbyterian funeral service at the baronet's mansion, Pollok House.[21]

Family[edit]

George Campbell was married to Euphemia Harriet, daughter of William Graham, LL.D, of the Scottish Naval and Military Academy in Edinburgh[22], a "famous Edinburgh teacher of his generation"[23], elocutionist and co-founder of the Scottish Institution for the Education of Young Ladies at Moray Place in Edinburgh.[24] Following the death of Euphemia, a church window designed by Oscar Patterson of West Regent Street, Glasgow, which still adorns Eastwood Church today, was erected overlooking the manse pew, the theme being the Psalmist playing on the harp to commemorate Mrs Campbell’s passion for sacred music. The inscription reads: “To the glory of God, and in affectionate remembrance of Mrs Euphemia Campbell, Eastwood Manse, the women of this parish have placed this memorial on the spot where she so long worshipped, 1896. Lord, I have loved the habitation of thy house.”[25] Son James Montgomery Campbell followed in his father's footsteps, whereas two of his daughters were married to Church of Scotland clergymen: Christina Drummond was the wife of Rev William Smith, minister of St Paul's, Dundee,[26] and daughter Edith Graham married Rev Maxwell James Wright, minister of St Ninian's, Aberdeen.[27]

William Graham LLD Pioneer of secondary education for girls
Psalmist with harp, Eastwood Parish Church, Renfrewshire
Euphemia Campbell inscription, Eastwood Parish Church, Renfrewshire

Death and Successor[edit]

After a brief illness in 1904, Rev George Campbell died.[28] His successor as parish minister was Rev James Mackie (1853-1908), of Tyrie in Aberdeenshire. Prior to his ordination, he spent 15 years assisting Rev Campbell in what had become one of the largest and busiest parishes in Scotland, incorporating the burgh of Pollokshaws, the Shawlands district of Glasgow City, and the villages of Thornliebank and Giffnock. Rev Mackie was very active in the working-class district of Pollokshaws, and when Campbell's health began to fail, Mackie took on much of the arduous work of managing the affairs of the parish, only to die unmarried four years after his induction.[29][30]

Rev James Mackie (1853-1908), Parish Minister of Eastwood, Glasgow

References[edit]

  1. Scott, Hew (1920). Fasti Ecclesiae Scoticanae: the Succession of Ministers in the Church of Scotland from the Reformation. III. Edinburgh: Oliver & Boyd. p. 137. Search this book on Amazon.com Logo.png
  2. Scott, Hew (1950). Fasti Ecclesiae Scoticanae: the Succession of Ministers in the Church of Scotland from the Reformation. VIII. Edinburgh: Oliver & Boyd. p. 720. Search this book on Amazon.com Logo.png
  3. "Newspaper article “Jubilee of the Minister of Eastwood”, 1903" (1903) [Partly unsourced newspaper clippings]. Carsphairn Archive, File: Green book of newspaper clippings previously belonging to William Findlay Dickson (1913-99), Carsphairn, ID: Misc_90. Carsphairn, Scotland: Carsphairn Heritage Centre, Carsphairn Heritage Initiative. Retrieved Mar26, 2021.
  4. "The Late Rev George Campbell". Paisley Gazette. British Newspaper Archive. May 7, 1904. p. 3.
  5. "The Late Rev George Campbell". Paisley Gazette. British Newspaper Archive. May 7, 1904. p. 3.
  6. Scott, Hew (1920). Fasti Ecclesiae Scoticanae: the Succession of Ministers in the Church of Scotland from the Reformation. III. Edinburgh: Oliver & Boyd. p. 137. Search this book on Amazon.com Logo.png
  7. "Ordination at Eastwood". Glasgow Constitutional. Nov 19, 1853. p. 6.
  8. "To Schoolmasters". Glasgow Herald. Jun 2, 1854. p. 1.
  9. "Housebreaking at Pollokshaws". North British Daily Mail. Aug 11, 1855. p. 2.
  10. "Church Service Society". Newcastle Journal. Aug 3, 1863. p. 2.
  11. Church Service Society. 1873. Retrieved Mar 26, 2021. Search this book on Amazon.com Logo.png
  12. Scott, Hew (1920). Fasti Ecclesiae Scoticanae: the Succession of Ministers in the Church of Scotland from the Reformation. III. Edinburgh: Oliver & Boyd. p. 137. Search this book on Amazon.com Logo.png
  13. "Roman Catholic School Books". Glasgow Herald. April 10, 1858. p. 4.
  14. "Death of a Scottish Minister". Dundee Courier. British Newspaper Archive. May 2, 1904. p. 7.
  15. "The Late Rev George Campbell". Paisley Gazette. British Newspaper Archive. May 7, 1904. p. 3.
  16. "Newspaper article “Jubilee of the Minister of Eastwood”, 1903" (1903) [Partly unsourced newspaper clippings]. Carsphairn Archive, File: Green book of newspaper clippings previously belonging to William Findlay Dickson (1913-99), Carsphairn, ID: Misc_90. Carsphairn, Scotland: Carsphairn Heritage Centre, Carsphairn Heritage Initiative. Retrieved Mar26, 2021.
  17. Scott, Hew (1920). Fasti Ecclesiae Scoticanae: the Succession of Ministers in the Church of Scotland from the Reformation. III. Edinburgh: Oliver & Boyd. p. 364. Search this book on Amazon.com Logo.png
  18. "Jubilee of Rev George Campbell, Eastwood". Aberdeen Press & Journal. Nov 18, 1903. p. 6.
  19. "Presentation at Pollokshaws". Shields Daily Gazette. Nov 23, 1902. p. 6.
  20. Campbell, George (1902). Eastwood: notes on the ecclesiastical antiquities of the parish. Paisley: Alexander Gardner. Search this book on Amazon.com Logo.png
  21. "Funeral of the Late Sir John Maxwell". Paisley Herald. Jun 17, 1865. p. 6.
  22. Scott, Hew (1920). Fasti Ecclesiae Scoticanae: the Succession of Ministers in the Church of Scotland from the Reformation. III. Edinburgh: Oliver & Boyd. p. 137. Search this book on Amazon.com Logo.png
  23. "The Late Rev George Campbell". Paisley Gazette. British Newspaper Archive. May 7, 1904. p. 3.
  24. "Death of Dr William Graham, Edinburgh". Dundee Evening Telegraph. Nov 23, 1886. p. 2.
  25. "Newspaper article “Memorial window to the late Mrs Campbell, 1896" (1896) [Partly unsourced newspaper clippings]. Carsphairn Archive, File: Green book of newspaper clippings previously belonging to William Findlay Dickson (1913-99), Carsphairn, ID: Misc_90. Carsphairn, Scotland: Carsphairn Heritage Centre, Carsphairn Heritage Initiative. Retrieved Mar26, 2021.
  26. Scott, Hew (1920). Fasti Ecclesiae Scoticanae: the Succession of Ministers in the Church of Scotland from the Reformation. III. Edinburgh: Oliver & Boyd. p. 137. Search this book on Amazon.com Logo.png
  27. Scott, Hew (1926). Fasti Ecclesiae Scoticanae: the Succession of Ministers in the Church of Scotland from the Reformation. VI. Edinburgh: Oliver & Boyd. p. 30. Search this book on Amazon.com Logo.png
  28. "The Late Rev George Campbell". Paisley Gazette. British Newspaper Archive. May 7, 1904. p. 3.
  29. "Call to an Aberdeenshire Man". Aberdeen People’s Journal. British Newspaper Archive. Aug 27, 1904. p. 6.
  30. Scott, Hew (1920). Fasti Ecclesiae Scoticanae: the Succession of Ministers in the Church of Scotland from the Reformation. III. Edinburgh: Oliver & Boyd. p. 137. Search this book on Amazon.com Logo.png


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