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Hurricane Nicholas (2021)

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Hurricane Nicholas1
Current storm status
Category 1 hurricane (1-min mean)
2021 NRL AL142021 NICHOLAS infrared-gray satellite.png
Satellite image
2021 NHC AL142021 5day cone no line and wind.png
Forecast map
As of:10:00 p.m. CDT September 13 (03:00 UTC September 14)
Location:28°24′N 95°48′W / 28.4°N 95.8°W / 28.4; -95.8 (Hurricane Nicholas)
Fatal error: The format of the coordinate could not be determined. Parsing failed.


± 20 nm
About 20 mi (30 km) SE of Matagorda, Texas
About 45 mi (70 km) SW of Freeport, Texas
Sustained winds:65 knots (75 mph; 120 km/h) (1-min mean)
gusting to 80 knots (90 mph; 150 km/h)
Pressure:988 mbar (29.18 inHg)
Movement:NNE at 9 knots (10 mph; 17 km/h)
See more detailed information.

Hurricane Nicholas is a currently active Atlantic hurricane in the western Gulf of Mexico, threatening landfall in the U.S. state of Texas. The fourteenth named storm, and sixth hurricane of the 2021 Atlantic hurricane season, it originated from a tropical wave first monitored by the National Hurricane Center (NHC) on September 9, moving across the western Caribbean Sea. The system developed into a tropical storm on September 12, the approximate midway point of hurricane season.[1]

Meteorological history[edit]

Map plotting the track and the intensity of the storm, according to the Saffir–Simpson scale

At 06:00 UTC on September 9, the National Hurricane Center (NHC) began monitoring the northern portion of a tropical wave over the western Caribbean Sea for potential development as it moved across northern Central America and the Yucatán Peninsula toward the Bay of Campeche.[2] By the next day, the wave was interacting with a surface trough over the southern Gulf of Mexico, producing widespread but disorganized showers and thunderstorms across the region.[3] Showers and thunderstorms associated with this system increased and become better organized on September 12, and its top sustained winds reached 40 mph (65 km/h) (tropical storm force), as confirmed by an Air Force hurricane-hunter flight that morning.[1] As a result, advisories were initiated at 15:00 UTC on Tropical Storm Nicholas.[4]

After forming, the storm was found to be not very organized, as it lacked convective banding features. The eye was also not well defined.[5] After satellite imagery from radar and aircraft, it was found that the center had re-formed 150 nautical miles more north than expected and the storm had gained speed.[6] The storm entered the southern part of a large area of deep convection, as signs of an eyewall structure forming were beginning to become prominent.[7] The eyewall structure then dissipated and a new center began reforming north-northeast of the previous.[8] At 03:00 UTC on September 14, the storm was upgraded to a Category 1 hurricane.[9]

Current storm information[edit]

As of 10:00 p.m. CDT September 13 (03:00 UTC September 14), Hurricane Nicholas is located within 20 nautical miles of 28°24′N 95°48′W / 28.4°N 95.8°W / 28.4; -95.8 (Nicholas)

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, about 20 mi (30 km) SE of Port Aransas, Texas and about 45 mi (70 km) SW of Freeport, Texas. Maximum sustained winds are 65 knots (75 mph; 120 km/h), with gusts up to 80 knots (90 mph; 150 km/h). The minimum barometric pressure is 988 mbar (29.18 inHg), and the system is moving north-northeast at 9 knots (10 mph; 17 km/h). Hurricane-force winds extend outward up to 25 miles (35 km) from the center and tropical-storm-force winds extend outward up to 115 miles (185 km).

For the latest official information on Nicholas, see:

Preparations[edit]

Tropical wave that would form Nicholas shortly before formation on September 12.

When Tropical Storm Nicholas formed, tropical storm warnings were sent out along the coast from Barra El Mezquital and north to Port Aransas, Texas. Additionally, tropical storm watches were called from Port Aransas to High Island, Texas. Rainfall estimate totals were 8 to 16 inches, with some places potentially receiving 15 inches. Coastal Louisiana, which was battered by Hurricane Ida just weeks earlier, was estimated to receive 5 to 10 inches.[10] Governor of Louisiana, John Bel Edwards, declared a state of emergency and noted that areas affected by Hurricane Ida would possibly feel the effects of the tropical storm.[11] Schools in southern Texas were suspended on September 13.[12][13]

Watches and warnings[edit]

Template:HurricaneWarningsTable

  1. 1.0 1.1 Henson, Bob; Masters, Jeff (September 12, 2021). "Tropical Storm Nicholas to douse Texas coast with torrential rains". New Haven, Connecticut: Yale Climate Connections. Retrieved September 12, 2021.
  2. Brown, Daniel (September 9, 2021). NHC Graphical Outlook Archive (Report). Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved September 12, 2021.
  3. Papin, Philippe (September 10, 2021). NHC Graphical Outlook Archive (Report). Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved September 12, 2021.
  4. Brown, Daniel (September 12, 2021). Tropical Storm Nicholas Discussion Number 1 (Report). Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved September 12, 2021.
  5. Brown, Daniel (September 12, 2021). Tropical Storm Nicholas Discussion Number 3 (Report). Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved September 12, 2021.
  6. Brown, Daniel (September 12, 2021). Tropical Storm Nicholas Discussion Number 4 (Report). Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved September 12, 2021.
  7. Brown, Daniel (September 13, 2021). Tropical Storm Nicholas Discussion Number 5 (Report). Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved September 13, 2021.
  8. Brown, Daniel (September 13, 2021). Tropical Storm Nicholas Discussion Number 6 (Report). Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved September 13, 2021.
  9. Brown, Daniel (September 13, 2021). Tropical Storm Nicholas Discussion Number 8 (Report). Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved September 13, 2021.
  10. "Flash flood risk grows for coastal Texas and Louisiana as Tropical Storm Nicholas takes aim". 2021-09-13. Retrieved 2021-09-13.
  11. "Louisiana declares state of emergency as Tropical Storm Nicholas targets battered region". 2021-09-12. Retrieved 2021-09-13.
  12. "LIST: CCISD and area school district closure status". 2021-09-12. Retrieved 2021-09-13.
  13. "Tropical Storm Nicholas 2021: Here's a list of school closures for South Texas". 2021-09-12. Retrieved 2021-09-13.

Written and edited by Prap Young


Hurricane Ida also written and edited by Prap Young

See also[edit]


Other articles of the topic Tropical cyclones : Hurricane Ida (2021), Hurricane Enrique (2021), Hurricane Norman (2018), Hurricane Karen (2007), Tropical Storm Krovanh (2020), Effects of Cyclone Amphan in India, Hurricane Florence (2018)
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  • Other storms of the same name
  • List of Texas hurricanes (1980–present)
  • Timeline of the 2021 Atlantic hurricane season
  • List of Category 1 Atlantic hurricanes
  • Tropical Depression Eight (1981) – depression developed over the Bay of Campeche and made landfall in Tamaulipas
  • Hurricane Bret (1999) – organized in the Bay of Campeche and made landfall in Texas
  • Hurricane Humberto (2007) - quickly-organizing Category 1 hurricane that made landfall in Texas
  • Tropical Storm Beta (2020) – organized in the southwestern Gulf of Mexico and made landfall in Texas