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Hurricane Ida (2021)

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Hurricane Ida
Category 4 major hurricane (SSHWS/NWS)
Ida 2021-08-29 1400Z.png
Hurricane Ida at peak intensity nearing landfall in Louisiana on August 29
FormedAugust 26, 2021
DissipatedSeptember 4, 2021
(Extratropical after September 1)
Highest winds1-minute sustained: 150 mph (240 km/h)
Lowest pressure929 mbar (hPa); 27.43 inHg
Fatalities111 total
Damage≥ $50.04 billion (2021 USD)
(Sixth-costliest tropical cyclone on record)
Areas affectedVenezuela, Colombia, Jamaica, Cayman Islands, Cuba, Gulf Coast of the United States (especially Louisiana), East Coast of the United States (especially the Northeastern United States), Atlantic Canada
Part of the 2021 Atlantic hurricane season
Effects
  • Tornado outbreak
  • Northeastern US

Other wikis

Hurricane Ida was a deadly and destructive Category 4 Atlantic hurricane that became the second-most damaging and intense hurricane to strike the U.S. state of Louisiana on record, behind Hurricane Katrina, and is tied for the strongest landfall in the state by maximum winds with Hurricane Laura a year before and the 1856 Last Island hurricane. The storm also caused catastrophic flooding across the Northeastern United States. Ida is the sixth-costliest tropical cyclone on record, having caused at least $50 billion (2021 USD) in damages,[1] of which $18 billion was in insured losses in Louisiana, surpassing Hurricane Ike of 2008. The ninth named storm, fourth hurricane, and second major hurricane of the 2021 Atlantic hurricane season, Ida originated from a tropical wave in the Caribbean Sea on August 23. On August 26, the wave developed into a tropical depression, which organized further and became Tropical Storm Ida later that day, near Grand Cayman. Amid favorable conditions, Ida intensified into a hurricane on August 27, just before moving over western Cuba. A day later, the hurricane underwent rapid intensification over the Gulf of Mexico, and reached its peak intensity as a strong Category 4 hurricane while approaching the northern Gulf Coast, with maximum sustained winds of 150 mph (240 km/h) and a minimum central pressure of 929 millibars (27.4 inHg). On August 29, the 16th anniversary of Hurricane Katrina, Ida made landfall near Port Fourchon, Louisiana. Ida weakened steadily over land, becoming a tropical depression on August 30, as it turned northeastward. On September 1, Ida transitioned into a post-tropical cyclone as it accelerated through the northeastern United States, breaking multiple rainfall records in various locations before moving out into the Atlantic on the next day. Afterward, Ida's remnant moved into the Gulf of St. Lawrence and stalled there for a couple of days, before being absorbed into another developing low on September 4.

Ida knocked down palm trees and destroyed many homes in Cuba during its brief passage over the country. Throughout its path of destruction in Louisiana, more than a million people in total had no electrical power. Widespread heavy infrastructural damage occurred throughout the southeastern portion of the state, as well as extremely heavy flooding in coastal areas. New Orleans' levees survived,[2] though power line damage was extensive throughout the whole city. There was also substantial plant destruction in the state. The remnants of the storm produced a destructive tornado outbreak and catastrophic flash flooding in the Northeastern United States on September 1. Flooding in New York City prompted the shutdown of much of the transportation system.

As of September 7, a total of 109 deaths have been confirmed in relation to Ida, including 91 in the United States and 20 in Venezuela. In the United States, 31 deaths were in Louisiana, 29 in New Jersey, 18 in New York, 5 in Pennsylvania, 2 in Mississippi, 2 in Alabama, 2 in Maryland, 1 in Virginia, and 1 in Connecticut. The storm has caused 43 indirect deaths, including 20 deaths in Venezuela caused by flooding from Ida's precursor.[3] A Louisiana man was mauled to death by an alligator after walking through Ida's floodwaters,[4][5] Two electrical workers died while repairing power grid damage caused by the storm.[6] while four people died in New Orleans and Jefferson Parish as a result of carbon monoxide poisoning while using generators with inadequate ventilation.[7][8] After the storm had passed, nearly all of the oil production along the Gulf Coast was shut down. Thousands of emergency crew members were deployed in Louisiana, and hundreds of residents were rescued.[9] Power outages in the most heavily affected areas were expected to last for up to a month. States of emergency were declared for Louisiana and portions of the Northeast. Several sporting events were also moved, delayed, or cancelled due to the storm.

Meteorological history[edit]

Map plotting the track and the intensity of the storm, according to the Saffir–Simpson scale

On August 23, the National Hurricane Center (NHC) first noted the potential for tropical cyclone development in the southwestern Caribbean Sea,[10] related to a tropical wave that entered the eastern Caribbean Sea on the same day.[11] By August 25, the NHC assessed a high likelihood of development as the wave moved westward through the Caribbean.[12] On the next day, the system's convection, or thunderstorms, became more organized to the south of Jamaica.[13] By 15:00 UTC on August 26, the system had attained sufficient organization to be classified as Tropical Depression Nine, about 115 mi (180 km) south-southwest of Negril, Jamaica. Upon its development, the depression was moving northwestward, steered by a ridge located over the western Atlantic Ocean. Favorable factors in the system's further development included warm waters of the northwestern Caribbean Sea, low wind shear, and a moist environment.[14]

Hurricane Ida southeast of the Louisiana coast on August 29

Late on August 26, a Hurricane Hunters flight indicated that the depression intensified into Tropical Storm Ida 130 mi (209 km) Southwest of Grand Cayman, Cayman Islands.[15] Initially, the storm had an asymmetric structure, with its strongest winds and deepest convection located east of the center. This was due to some southwesterly wind shear, which gradually lessened.[16] As Ida moved through the Cayman Islands and toward northwestern Cuba, its structure improved, with more outflow, increased rainbands, and the organization of the convection into a central dense overcast (CDO).[17] Ida then rapidly intensified, with its winds increasing by 35 mph (55 km/h) in just over 11 hours. Late on August 27, the NHC upgraded Ida to Category 1 hurricane status, based on observations made by the Hurricane Hunters.[18] Around the same time, the hurricane made landfall on Cuba's Isla de la Juventud.[19] Ida later made a second landfall in Pinar del Río, Cuba, at 23:20 UTC on the same day.[20] Ida subsequently underwent rapid intensification and strengthened into a Category 2 hurricane at 18:00 UTC on August 28.[21] Soon afterward, Ida moved over the warm waters of the Loop Current in the Gulf of Mexico,[22] and the storm intensified into a Category 3 major hurricane by 06:00 UTC on August 29. Shortly after being upgraded to a major hurricane, Ida began intensifying even more quickly, with the system's minimum central pressure dropping from 955 mbar (28.2 inHg) to 948 mbar (28.0 inHg) in an hour.[23] By 07:00 UTC, Ida had further intensified into a Category 4 hurricane, with the storm's sustained winds reaching 130 mph (215 km/h).[24]

Ida as an Extratropical cyclone over the Northeastern United States

As Ida neared the Louisiana coast, it further strengthened to its peak intensity, with 1-minute sustained wind speeds of 150 mph (240 km/h) and a minimum central barometric pressure of 929 mbar (27.4 inHg) around 14:00 UTC.[25] Ida's central pressure dropped 40 mbar in 12 hours overnight from August 28 to 29. At peak, the hurricane displayed a pronounced satellite presentation, with a near-symmetrical structure and a well-defined eye with an impressive stadium effect visible. Strengthening was then halted as the storm began an eyewall replacement cycle, forming a second eyewall, but Ida remained near its peak intensity. At 16:55 UTC, Ida made landfall near Port Fourchon, Louisiana, with sustained winds of 150 mph (240 km/h) and a central pressure of 930 mbar (27.46 inHg), tying the 1856 Last Island hurricane and Hurricane Laura as the strongest landfalling hurricane on record in Louisiana, as measured by maximum sustained wind, and trailing only Hurricane Katrina, as measured by central pressure at landfall.[26][27][28] A ship at sea near the point of landfall verified this intensity, with reported gusts as high as 172 mph (277 km/h).[29]

Following landfall, Ida only slowly weakened at first, remaining a dangerous major hurricane. Mesovortices were also visible within the eye.[30] Ida retained Category 4 winds for four hours following landfall, and then Category 3 status for the next four hours, due to the brown ocean effect, as the marshlands and the flat terrain in southern Louisiana allowed Ida to retain its intensity for a longer period of time.[31] As the storm moved further inland, the majority of its cloud cover shifted northeast of the center, and Ida began a period of rapid weakening. On August 30, Ida weakened into a tropical depression, as it moved inland. At that time, the NHC issued their last advisory on Ida, transferring the responsibility for continuing advisories to the Weather Prediction Center (WPC).[32] The system degenerated into an extratropical low two days later, as it moved over the central Appalachian Mountains.[33] As the system moved through the Northeastern United States on September 1–2, it combined with a frontal zone to unleash unprecedented rainfall across the region, regaining tropical-storm-force winds in the process, before moving out into the Atlantic.[34][35] On the next day, Ida's remnants moved northeastward across Atlantic Canada, bringing heavy rain and gale-force winds to communities throughout the region.[36] That same day, Ida's remnants stalled in the Gulf of St. Lawrence, making a slow, counter clockwise loop while gradually weakening.[37][38] Late on September 4, Ida's remnant was absorbed by another developing low to the east.[39]

There has been no formal study of the exact impact of climate change on Hurricane Ida yet. Several of its characteristics are probably more common in a warmer climate: the intensity, the rapid intensification, and the amount of rainfall over land.[40]

Preparations[edit]

Caribbean[edit]

Cayman Islands[edit]

On August 26, 2021, the Cayman Islands were put under a Tropical Storm Warning. With the expectation of a landfall or near landfall on Grand Cayman, schools and businesses were closed, and the government had fully activated the NEOC and the Emergency Services, in addition to deploying the Cayman Islands Regiment and Cayman Islands Coast Guard for the HADR and SAR operations. Many people piled into grocery stores and hardware stores to grab supplies having Hurricane Grace that hit Cayman just a week earlier fresh in everyone's minds. Cayman Airways cancelled some of its flights and rescheduled them for a later day. The utility company had announced that they were planning on little to no power outages.[41][42][43][needs update]

Cuba[edit]

Hurricane Ida over western Cuba late on August 27

On August 28, 800 individuals, including teachers and students monitoring turtles on the Guanahacabibes Peninsula, were evacuated due to Ida, according to the head of civil defense in the area.[44] La Palma also sheltered 6,281 people from the storm.[45]

United States[edit]

Tornado watches were issued for parts of Louisiana, Alabama, and Mississippi on August 29. The Storm Prediction Center issued a 5% tornado risk the same day for the 3 states, which included an overall slight risk.[46][47] Over 16 ft (4.9 m) of storm surge was anticipated for Louisiana, 6–9 ft (1.8–2.7 m) for Mississippi, 3–5 ft (0.91–1.52 m) for Alabama, and 1–3 ft (0.30–0.91 m) for Florida.[48] A high risk for flash flooding was issued on August 29, encompassing much of New Orleans and surrounding areas.[49] A widespread area of 15–20 in (380–510 mm) of rainfall was forecasted the day Ida made landfall.[50] Approximately 95% of U.S. oil production in the Gulf of Mexico was shut down.[51]

Louisiana[edit]

The Louisiana National Guard making preparations for the storm

On August 27, the preseason NFL football game for the Arizona Cardinals and New Orleans Saints, originally scheduled for the next day at Caesars Superdome, was cancelled due to the storm's forecast of being a major hurricane at the time of its landfall. Before this, the game's start was moved to noon CDT from the originally scheduled 7 PM CDT.[52][53][54] Governor John Bel Edwards declared a state of emergency in response to the storm.[55] On August 28, New Orleans mayor LaToya Cantrell issued a mandatory evacuation for all parts of the city which are outside of its flood protections area.[56] That same day, President Joe Biden signed an emergency declaration for Louisiana ahead of the storm.[57]

In a briefing that was held on August 28, one day prior to landfall, Edwards anticipated Ida to be one of the strongest hurricanes to affect the state since the 1850s.[58] The Governor also mentioned the levee system in New Orleans, saying Ida "will be the most severe test of that system". This comes after the 2005 levee failures in Greater New Orleans during Katrina.[59] The state's hospitals' capacities were of concern, due to them already being pushed to near full capacity from the COVID-19 surge that was ongoing at the time. Victims of Ida were expected to fill hospitals in affected areas.[60]

On September 7, it was reported that 4 people had died and 141 people were in hospital in the state of Louisiana with carbon monoxide poisoning following Ida. According to the Louisiana Department of Health, these deaths were caused by generators being used indoors, amid power outages following the devastation of the hurricane. The recommendations are to place generations at least 20ft away from homes, and for a carbon monoxide detector or alarm to be set up immediately. [61]

Mississippi[edit]

In Mississippi, at least 15 school districts and universities were ordered to close on Monday, August 30, along with a dozen casinos ahead of the impact of the storm.[62] Entergy Mississippi expected significant damage to the system in the Jackson metropolitan area.[63]

Elsewhere[edit]

On August 30, rains were still expected in southeastern Louisiana, coastal Mississippi, and a warning of heavy rainfall was issued for southwestern Alabama. Similar warnings were issued for the coming hours for the valleys of Tennessee and Ohio as well as the Mid-Atlantic region as the storm moves further north.[64] Tens of millions were at risk for heavy rainfall, flooding, and tornadoes on September 1. More than 14.5 million were put under an enhanced risk that was issued that same day by the SPC. This included a 10% tornado risk.[65][66] Extreme rainfall was expected for New York City, with Central Park possibly seeing more than September's monthly average in just one day. Flash flood watches were issued at 2 p.m. EDT on September 1 for all five boroughs, including Long Island and Orange, Putnam, Rockland, Ulster, Dutchess, Sullivan, and Westchester counties. The watch extended to Hudson, Bergen, Essex, and Union counties in New Jersey.[67] In Pennsylvania, Governor Tom Wolf signed a proclamation of disaster emergency on August 31 in anticipation of flooding, severe storms, and tornadoes from the remnants of Ida.[68]

Impact[edit]

Caribbean[edit]

As a tropical wave, Ida triggered flooding in western Venezuela on August 23, killing 20 people.[3][69]

In Cuba, numerous palm trees were downed on Isla de la Juventud due to hurricane-force winds that struck the island. La Fe recorded 50 mph (80 km/h) winds and gusts up to 71 mph (114 km/h) on August 27.[70][71] Many houses were also destroyed by strong winds and branches of trees were snapped in La Coloma, Pinar del Río.[72] Los Palacios, and Consolación del Sur also lost electricity, according to a local newspaper in the province.[73] Despite the hurricane, many hospital workers continued to work during the storm.[74] Overall Ida costed $40 million in insurance loss and $100 million dollars in damages in Cuba.[75][76]

United States[edit]

Deaths in the U.S.
State Total Direct Indirect Ref.
Louisiana 31 10 21 [77][78][4][79][80]
New Jersey 29 29 0 [81][82]
New York 18 18 0 [83]
Pennsylvania 5 5 0 [84]
Mississippi 2 2 0 [85]
Alabama 2 0 2 [6]
Maryland 2 2 0 [84]
Connecticut 1 1 0 [84]
Virginia 1 1 0 [84]
Total 91 68 23

Extreme damage was recorded in Louisiana, with a very large number of houses being damaged or destroyed, and storm surge and rain causing widespread flooding and water damage.[86] Power outages were extensive through the southeastern portion of the state. As Ida moved to the Northeastern United States, its remnants spawned several tornadoes, with some being damaging and powerful. Record rain and high-level flash flooding occurred through extensive portions of the Northeast. Ida was estimated to have caused at least $50 billion (2021 USD) in damages in the United States.[1] Dozens of residents died, mostly in New Jersey and New York.[87]

Louisiana[edit]

Hurricane Ida at landfall in Port Fourchon, Louisiana, on August 29; an outer eyewall can be seen surrounding the inner eyewall.

Severe damage was recorded across the coastal areas of Louisiana, including in New Orleans, Golden Meadow, Houma, Galliano, LaPlace, and Grand Isle.[88][89] In Houma, whiteout conditions were recorded, with flying debris and many houses damaged or destroyed.[90][91] Wireless services were knocked out temporarily.[92] An urgent flood warning was issued for Braithwaite when one of the levees was overtopped.[93][94] In Galliano, many homes were destroyed, trees were uprooted, cars overturned and power lines brought down.[95] The Lady of the Sea General Hospital in Galliano was damaged, losing a significant amount of the roof.[96][88]

Significant damage was recorded in the French Quarter in New Orleans, including destroyed roofs and building collapses.[88] The historic Karnofsky Shop collapsed.[97] Nearly all of New Orleans lost electricity due to major damage to transmission lines, while about 1 million people throughout the state were left without power.[98] Two drowning deaths were reported including a man who drowned in New Orleans after attempting to drive his vehicle through floodwater.[85][8]

One of the ferries used on the Lower Algiers-Chalmette route across the Mississippi River broke free of its mooring during the hurricane, drifted up the river, and then ran aground.[99] One of the sections of the Gulf Outlet Dam was overtopped by the storm surge.[100] The USGS recorded the Mississippi River near Belle Chase flowing in reverse due to the volume of the surge.[101][102] The St. Stephen Catholic School in New Orleans lost its roof.[103]

An anemometer in Grand Isle recorded a gust of 148 mph (238 km/h) before being destroyed.[104][105] In Prairieville, a man was killed when a tree fell on his home during the hurricane.[85][106] An anemometer in Port Fourchon recorded a gust of 172 mph (277 km/h) when Ida came ashore.[107]

Hurricane Ida shortly after landfall, maintaining its strength over land

Major damage was reported in Jefferson Parish.[108] On August 30, insured damage was estimated to be at least $15 billion.[109] Outside the post-Katrina flood protection system, eight feet (2.4 m) of water overtopped levees in lower Jefferson Parish [110] forcing residents in Lafitte to flee to their rooftops to escape floodwaters.[111] Entergy shut down the Waterford Nuclear Generating Station due to off-site electrical power being lost. Separate energy from emergency diesel generators was used to maintain safe shutdown conditions. The lowest level of alert, "unusual event", was issued. There were no reports of significant equipment damage.[112][113] On August 31, 2021, a 71-year-old man was presumed dead after being mauled by an alligator while walking through floodwaters in Slidell.[4][5]

Aerial photos and footage was released, which showed large-scale destruction, debris, and flooding throughout affected areas.[114][115] On August 31, a 24-year-old man was found dead in Uptown New Orleans. The cause of death was assumed to be carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning. The next day, in the same city, 12 people, including 7 children, were hospitalized due to CO poisoning. Three additional CO poisoning deaths were reported on September 2 in Jefferson Parish.[8] In nearby St. Tammany Parish, nine people were hospitalized from the same cause.[7]

Grand Isle was rendered uninhabitable. Up to 12 breaks in its sand levee led to 100% of structures being damaged, with 40% being completely destroyed, or being blocked by piles of debris, and electrical lines were toppled and buried. Parts of the island were covered by up to 3 feet (0.91 m) of sand. The police station was affected, with the roof being torn apart. The chief, Scooter Resweber, called it the "most severe hurricane" he had ever experienced.[116] A St. James Parish man was killed after his backyard shed fell on top of him during Hurricane Ida's heavy winds.[78] Four storm-related deaths were also reported in Tangipahoa Parish among nursing home residents evacuated during Hurricane Ida.[117] As a result of power outages one person died in New Orleans due to heat exhaustion and another person died from a lack of oxygen in St. Tammany Parish.[118][119] One person also died after falling from a roof while making damage repairs.[120]

A week after the storm, over a million people in SE Louisiana were still without power.[121]

Mississippi[edit]

Over 113,000 people were without electricity on August 30.[98] On August 31, two people were killed and at least ten others were injured when seven vehicles plunged into a deep hole in a collapsed section of MS 26 in George County.[122] Heavy rains from Hurricane Ida had caused the highway to collapse.[123] Biloxi was minimally damaged, which was thought to be in part due to Hurricane Zeta's impacts from the previous year; many weak and dead trees and substandard structures were removed in that storm, potentially reducing the amount of debris available for Ida to cause damage with.[124]

Alabama[edit]

Seven weak tornadoes touched down throughout the state. Two electrical workers died in Adger while repairing power grid damage caused by the storm.[6]

Northeastern United States[edit]

In Buchanan County, Virginia, one person was found dead after flooding from the storm.[125] In Maryland, A 19-year-old man was confirmed dead after flooding at an apartment complex in Rockville.[126] In Frederick County, ten students and the bus driver had to be rescued when their school bus was caught in flooding.[127] An EF2 tornado caused considerable damage in Annapolis.[128] In Wilmington, Delaware, over 200 people were rescued from flooding caused by the storm along the Brandywine Creek.[129] CoreLogic estimated that Ida caused an estimated $16 to 24 billion in flooding damage, in the Northeastern United States.[130]

Pennsylvania[edit]
Flooding in Conshohocken, Pennsylvania on September 2, 2021
Damage from an EF2 tornado spawned by Ida in Upper Dublin Township, Pennsylvania.

In Pennsylvania, an EF2 tornado caused damage in Fort Washington, Upper Dublin Township, and Horsham Township in Montgomery County, Pennsylvania, knocking down trees and power lines and tearing the roof off of the Upper Dublin Police Department.[131] A woman was killed in Upper Dublin Township when the tornado blew a tree down onto her house.[132] In Milford Township, a man was found dead after he drowned in his vehicle in the Unami Creek.[133] An EF1 tornado struck Buckingham Township in Bucks County, an EF1 tornado hit Upper Makefield Township in Bucks County, and an EF2 tornado touched down in Oxford in Chester County.[134]

Heavy rain and extensive flooding occurred in Eastern Pennsylvania.[135] The Schuylkill River flooded portions of Philadelphia, with Interstate 676 (Vine Street Expressway) partially covered in water. Flooding from the river also affected the Manayunk neighborhood of Philadelphia, with residents rescued from apartments along Main Street.[134][136] Flooding from the Schuylkill River caused damage to SEPTA Regional Rail's Manayunk/Norristown Line between Miquon and Norristown, resulting in the suspension of service. Service between Center City Philadelphia and Spring Mill resumed on September 7 while service along the entire length of the line to Norristown will resume on September 13.[137] Overall Ida caused up to $100 million dollars in Southern Pennsylvania as a result.[138]

New Jersey and New York[edit]
Radar reflectivity depicting the remnants of Ida producing severe weather and flash flooding in the Northeastern United States on September 1.

The impact of Ida in New Jersey and New York was unusually intense and deadly. Ida was the third tropical system in as many weeks to soak the Northeastern United States, after Fred and Henri, which left the soil saturated and a greater risk of flooding.[139][140] Numerous flash flood warnings and flash flood emergencies were issued across the area as well.[141][142][143] Tornado warnings were also issued in parts of the New York City Metropolitan Area, including Westchester County, New York, and parts of Fairfield and Ridgefield in Connecticut.[144] The National Weather Service's New York City office issued its first ever flash flood emergency in response to severe flooding in northeastern New Jersey, followed an hour later by the first flash flood emergency ever for New York City itself.[145] An EF3 tornado destroyed multiple homes in Mullica Hill, New Jersey.[146] An EF1 tornado that tracked from Edgewater Park, New Jersey, to Bristol, Pennsylvania, prompted a rare tornado emergency for Bristol and Croydon, Pennsylvania, as well as Burlington, New Jersey.[147][148][134] An EF0 tornado struck Princeton, New Jersey.[134] Portions of Trenton, New Jersey, were evacuated due to flooding caused by the storm.[149] At least 27 people died in New Jersey, including one person who drowned inside their car in Passaic, New Jersey, and five others who died in their apartment complex in Elizabeth, New Jersey.[150][151][84][81][152][83] Over 81,740 power outages were reported on the night of September 1 in New Jersey.[153]

Long Island Expressway in New York City shut down due to flooding from the remnants of Hurricane Ida.

Widespread flooding shut down much of the New York City Subway system as well as large portions of the NJ Transit, Long Island Rail Road, and Metro-North Railroad commuter rail systems and Amtrak intercity services.[154][155] A tennis match at the 2021 U.S. Open was delayed when strong winds and rain came through the spaces of the naturally ventilated roof of Louis Armstrong Stadium.[156] Eighteen storm-related deaths were also reported in New York.[150][151][84][152][83] Most people who died in New York City, including a family of three in Woodside, Queens, lived in basement apartments.[157] Overall in New York Ida caused $50 million in damages.[158]

New England[edit]

Up to 9 in (230 mm) of rain fell over parts of Connecticut, resulting in widespread flooding.[159] A Connecticut state trooper died after he and his police cruiser were swept away by floodwaters from the Pomperaug River in Woodbury.[160] Similar rainfall total were recorded in neighboring Rhode Island, and rivers in the state rose towards moderate flood stage.[161] In southeastern Massachusetts, New Bedford received 9.5 in (240 mm) of rain and an EF0 tornado touched down at Dennis, on Cape Cod.[162]

Atlantic Canada[edit]

Heavy rain from Ida's remnants inundated Canada's Maritime provinces on September 2, and several power outages were reported. Brier Island, in the Bay of Fundy, just off the coast of Nova Scotia received 4.8 in (121 mm) of rain. Wind gusts reached 53 mph (85 km/h) at Lunenburg, Nova Scotia.[163] Environment Canada reported that 5.07 in (128.8 mm) of rain fell in Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island. More rain fell in just 24 hours throughout the province than in any average month. Wind gusts in and around the Northumberland Strait reached as high as 62 mph (100 km/h).[164]

In Quebec, 3.9 in (100 mm) of rain fell on the Magdalen Islands on September 3, washing out various sections of road, especially near L'Étang-du-Nord and in the Havre-Aubert sectors. The schools suspended their classes for September 3.[165] Elsewhere, 2.0–3.9 in (50–100 mm) of rain fell across the Gaspé Peninsula, Anticosti Island and the Lower North Shore, according to the Meteorological Service of Canada.[166][167] The rains caused flooding, forced the evacuation of several houses and a retirement home, as well as road closures, in the Grande-Vallée to Rivière-au-Renard region of the Gaspé where the accumulations exceeded 3.9 in (100 mm).[168] In addition, winds reached 50–68 mph (80–110 km/h) in these regions causing a strong storm surge.[167]

In Newfoundland and Labrador, 1.2–2.4 in (30–60 mm) of rain fell over central and western parts of Newfoundland, with 2.63 in (66.8 mm) recorded at the La Scie station (near Baie Verte). Winds reached 68 mph (110 km/h) in Wreckhouse and 55 mph (88 km/h) in Stephenville in the southwest.[169]

Aftermath[edit]

United States[edit]

Costliest U.S. Atlantic hurricanes
Rank Hurricane Season Damage
1 Katrina 2005 $125 billion
Harvey 2017
3 Maria 2017 $90 billion
4 Sandy 2012 $65 billion
5 Irma 2017 $52.1 billion
6 Ida 2021 $50 billion
7 Ike 2008 $30 billion
8 Andrew 1992 $27 billion
9 Michael 2018 $25 billion
10 Florence 2018 $24.2 billion
Source: National Hurricane Center[170][nb 1][171]
U.S. President Joe Biden meets with FEMA officials on September 2

The storm shut down nearly all Gulf Coast oil production, accounting for about 15% of the U.S. total. Louisiana's mainland refineries were also shut down, which account for 12.5% of the nation's capacity. The Colonial Pipeline was partially shut down as a result of the hurricane. This combination of factors caused prices to rise for oil and gasoline products across the United States.[172] Early estimates of insured losses are from $15 billion to $25 billion.[173] The offshore and onshore of the Gulf Region is up to $35 billion dollars in Insured loss.[174]

Louisiana[edit]

File:Lousaina flooding by Hurricane Ida.png
Flooding in Louisiana by Hurricane Ida

Recovering from the massive blackout in New Orleans was originally estimated to take weeks [98] but most power was restored within 10 days.[175] The Massachusetts Task Force sent an 80-member team to Baton Rouge to help with the impacts of Ida on August 29. The team was composed of emergency medical technicians, doctors, structure, communication and logistics specialists, and emergency room technicians, among others.[176] People in lower-income communities affected by Ida had trouble affording to leave.[177] States such as Texas[178] and South Carolina[179] and national non-profits also gathered donations to distribute to victims and to help in the search and rescue operations.

Over 5,000 national guard members were deployed, and more than 25,000 workers nationwide came in support of recovery efforts. U.S. President Joe Biden declared a major disaster in the state, which allowed for extra funding and recovery. Sweltering weather conditions following Ida worsened the living quality of many surviving residents without power and food. More than 2 million were placed under heat advisories after Ida passed. Officials said that power may not be restored to some for up to a month, a delay that could be life-threatening because of intense heat.[180]

The Louisiana National Guard activated 4,900 guard personnel, and dispatched about 200 high-water vehicles, along with more than 70 rescue boats and 30 helicopters. By the afternoon of August 30, 191 people and 27 pets were rescued after crews checked 400 homes. Governor John Bel Edwards said the damage was "catastrophic" and that officials believe the death toll "could rise considerably".[181] Tulane University announced plans to evacuate its campus of all remaining students and to take them to Houston. Many people fled to stores to get food and water, and to gas stations to get fuel.[92] John Bel Edwards said in a preliminary survey of the state's levees that they worked as intended and held water out.[2]

On August 30, it was announced that the college football game between Tulane and Oklahoma scheduled for September 4 was being moved from New Orleans to Norman, Oklahoma, although Tulane would still be considered the home team.[182] On September 3, Tulane's second home game against Morgan State scheduled for September 11 was moved to Legion Field in Birmingham, Alabama. Tulane volleyball's tournament scheduled for September 17–18 against UAB, Sam Houston and Texas Tech was also moved to Birmingham with inside UAB's Bartow Arena. All fans were allowed to attend the two events free of charge.[183] On August 31, the New Orleans Saints announced they were planning to use an interim facility in the Dallas-Fort Worth area for the first four weeks of the 2021 NFL season.[184] The next day, their season opener against the Green Bay Packers on September 12 was moved to TIAA Bank Field in Jacksonville, Florida.[185]

Northeast[edit]

The remnants of Hurricane Ida inundated many of New York's subway tunnels, shutting down much of the MTA system.

States of emergency were declared in New York, including in New York City, as well as in New Jersey by governors Kathy Hochul and Phil Murphy.[150] Several New Jersey public school districts delayed or cancelled classes because of flooding or severe weather damage.[186] Newark Liberty International Airport suffered flooding in the terminals, and all departures were grounded. Operations continued the following morning, with flight delays and cancellations.[187] On September 2, it was announced that due to the major flooding around SHI Stadium, the college football opening game between Rutgers and Temple scheduled for that day would be postponed to September 4.[188] Connecticut Governor Ned Lamont also declared a State of Emergency for the entire state following widespread flooding.[159]

Bethesda Terrace after the flood receded from most of it

Many rescue crews were sent in boats through flooded streets the day after the storm in Philadelphia, northern Delaware, and portions of New York state. Thousands of rescues had happened in Pennsylvania alone that day, and first responders helped bring communities to safety from halted subway trains the night of the flooding in New York City. Some were stranded overnight. The city also saw its share of hundreds of rescues the next day.[136]

Major flooding caused several homes and businesses in Manville, New Jersey to catch fire. They burned for hours after exploding from utility damage. Fire crews were unable to reach them due to the high flood waters. Manville was said to have the worst flooding in the entire state. Other notable flooding in the state occurred in Woodbridge Township, Carteret, Rahway, Perth Amboy, Newark, Jersey City, and Paterson.[189]

President Joe Biden commented on the flooding rains from the storms remnants, stating that New York recorded more rain Wednesday than "it usually sees the entire month of September". Mayor Bill de Blasio of New York City said Ida was "unlike anything we've seen before". Most of the city's deaths were in Queens.[190] Rainfall in Central Park broke a 2-week record, while Newark, New Jersey, broke a 62-year record.[191] The estimated damages from the northeast are $16-24 billion dollars in damages.[192]

See also[edit]


Other articles of the topic Caribbean : Andre Hinds, Burton Forde, Aerowings, Anansesem Ezine, Caribbean News Now, Earl Alexander (footballer), Urtis Blackett

Other articles of the topic Tropical cyclones : Hurricane Norman (2018), Hurricane Florence (2018), Tropical Storm Krovanh (2020), Effects of Cyclone Amphan in India, Cyclone Josie, Hurricane Enrique (2021), Hurricane Nicholas (2021)

Other articles of the topic United States : Ari Mannis, Troyce Eual Guice, Space programs of the United States, Celia Reina, Batgirl (film), American Baccalaureate School, Facilis Technology Inc.

Other articles of the topic Canada : BFL CANADA, Canadian Agri-Food Trade Alliance, List of rural communities in New Brunswick, Chinese people, HotKid, Canadian men's national beach volleyball team, List of proposed provinces and territories of Canada

  • Tropical cyclones in 2021
  • List of Category 4 Atlantic hurricanes
  • List of costliest Atlantic hurricanes
  • 1909 Grand Isle hurricane
  • 1915 New Orleans hurricane
  • Hurricane Betsy (1965) – Affected New Orleans as a Category 4 hurricane
  • Hurricane Camille (1969) – A Category 5 hurricane that took a similar track through the Caribbean, then caused catastrophic flooding in the mid-Atlantic
  • Hurricane Agnes (1972) – A Category 1 hurricane that also made landfall in the Gulf Coast before causing widespread flooding in the Mid-Atlantic and the Northeast
  • Hurricane Gustav (2008) – A Category 4 hurricane that had a similar track through the Caribbean
  • Tropical Storm Lee (2011) – Another storm to make landfall in Louisiana, then cause mass flooding in the northeast United States
  • Hurricane Michael (2018) – Another major hurricane which rapidly intensified in the Gulf of Mexico before making landfall just east of Panama City, Florida
  • Hurricane Zeta (2020) – The last major hurricane to make landfall in southeastern Louisiana prior to Ida

Notes[edit]

  1. All damage figures in this table are in nominal value in 2017 USD.

References[edit]

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External links[edit]