Welcome to EverybodyWiki 😃 ! Nuvola apps kgpg.png Log in or ➕👤 create an account to improve, watchlist or create an article like a 🏭 company page or a 👨👩 bio (yours ?)...

John Brignell

From EverybodyWiki Bios & Wiki


John Brignell, Ph.D., was a retired Professor of Industrial Instrumentation at University of Southampton.[1]

Biography[edit]

He studied at Stationers' Company's School and his career started with a position of an apprentice at STC. Later he studied at Northampton Engineering College (now City, University of London) and got the degrees of BSc(Eng) and PhD of London University.

After getting PhD he became a member of the staff at Northampton and was a Research Assistant, a Research Fellow and a Lecturer.

Brignell lectures at Lloyds of London, mainly on the topics of the abuse of statistics.

Popular science works[edit]

Brignell retired in the late 1990s from his academic career and now devotes part of his time to his interest in debunking what he asserts to be the use of poor science and false statistics common in much of today's media. In this context, he has expressed controversial opinions on many subjects. In particular, he has rejected the evidence and theoretical basis for anthropogenic global warming,[2] questioned the relationship between second-hand smoke and lung cancer,[3] and suggested that the hole in the ozone layer existed before the rise in the use of chlorofluorocarbons.[2]

He has published two popular science books, Sorry Wrong Number and The Epidemiologists: Have They Got Scares for You!, which have been reviewed in the British press (for example,[4][5]).

In mid-2005, Brignell prepared a list of over 600 links to news reports linking various contradictory phenomena to global warming.[6] In November 2007, this list appeared on the spiked website,[7] then the Rush Limbaugh show,[8][dead link] and has since been quoted in other places, e.g.[9]

Criticism[edit]

Bob Carroll (author of the Skeptic's Dictionary) initially accepted Brignell's argument against the EPA. However, he changed his mind on the basis that the "scientific principle" (relative risk less than 2) that Brignell used to reject the finding was not recognized by epidemiologists.[10]

Books[edit]

  • John Brignell and Godfrey M Rhodes, Laboratory on-line computing: an introduction for engineers and physicists, Intertext, 1975. ISBN 978-0-7002-0258-4 Search this book on Amazon.com Logo.png..
  • John Brignell and Neil White, Intelligent sensor systems, Institute of Physics (Great Britain), 1994. ISBN 978-0-7503-0297-5 Search this book on Amazon.com Logo.png..
  • John Brignell, Sorry, wrong number!, Brignell Associates, September 2000. ISBN 978-0-9539108-0-9 Search this book on Amazon.com Logo.png.
  • John Brignell, The epidemiologists: Have they got scares for you!, Brignell Associates, July 2004. ISBN 978-0-9539108-2-3 Search this book on Amazon.com Logo.png..

References[edit]

  1. cv Archived 19 July 2011 at the Wayback Machine
  2. 2.0 2.1 November 2001 Archived 7 October 2010 at the Wayback Machine
  3. November 2005 Archived 9 October 2010 at the Wayback Machine
  4. Le Fanu J. In sickness and in health Telegraph (December 2000) Archived 25 May 2011 at the Wayback Machine
  5. Le Fanu J. In sickness and in health: why must medical research resort to quackery? Telegraph (13 September 2004) Archived 12 September 2012 at Archive.today
  6. A complete list of things caused by global warming Archived 25 December 2010 at the Wayback Machine
  7. "Got a problem? Blame global warming! | spiked". Archived from the original on 19 November 2010. Retrieved 27 November 2017. Unknown parameter |url-status= ignored (help)
  8. Global Warming Causes Everything Archived 12 June 2011 at the Wayback Machine
  9. U.S. Senate Report: Over 400 Prominent Scientists Disputed Man-Made Global Warming Claims in 2007 Senate Report Debunks "Consensus" Archived 2 February 2010 at the Wayback Machine
  10. Skeptic's Dictionary Newsletter 41 Archived 24 July 2010 at the Wayback Machine

External links[edit]


This article "John Brignell" is from Wikipedia. The list of its authors can be seen in its historical and/or the page Edithistory:John Brignell. Articles copied from Draft Namespace on Wikipedia could be seen on the Draft Namespace of Wikipedia and not main one.