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Luis Elizondo

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Luis Elizondo is a former employee of the Office of the Under Secretary of Defense for Intelligence (OUSDI) and a former U.S. Army Counterintelligence Special Agent. He is now the Director of Global Security and Special Programs at To the Stars Academy of Arts and Science.[1]

June 24, 2009 letter from Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid to Deputy Secretary of Defense William Lynn regarding the Advanced Aerospace Threat Identification Program (AATIP). Special Agent Luis Elizondo’s name is among those listed in the attachment (last page).

UFOs[edit]

Elizondo was head of the Advanced Aerospace Threat Identification Program (AATIP), a $22 million special access program initiated by the Defense Intelligence Agency in order to study UFOs. Elizondo also claims that the government has recovered "metal alloys and other materials" from these objects.[2] According to the Department of Defense, the AATIP program was ended in 2012 after five years, however reporting suggests that programs to investigate UFO continue.[3]

Elizondo claims he resigned from OUSDI to protest what he characterized as excessive secrecy and internal opposition.[4] In his resignation letter, Elizondo wonders why "certain individuals in the Department remain staunchly opposed to further research" of "unusual aerial systems interfering with military weapon platforms and displaying beyond next generation capabilities" despite numerous accounts by the United States Navy and other Services. Elizondo asserts that "underestimating or ignoring these potential threats is not in the best interest of the Department no matter the level of political contention."[5]

In 2017 Elizondo joined To the Stars Academy of Arts and Science and led the release of three videos made by pilots from the United States Navy taken during the USS Nimitz UFO incident and the USS Theodore Roosevelt UFO incidents.[6][7] The release was accompanied by the first mainstream press reporting on the existence of the AATIP.[8] In April 2019, the Navy acknowledged drafting new guidelines for pilots and other personnel to report encounters with "unidentified aircraft", and Elizondo told The Washington Post that it was "the single greatest decision the Navy has made in decades."[9] The classified nature of the videos and the validity of Elizondo's authorisation to distribute were questioned by some.[10][11][12] In April 2020, the United States Department of Defense released the videos prompting Elizondo to comment, "We are fueled by the Pentagon’s significant actions and hope this encourages a new wave of credible information to come forward."[13]

A six-part History Channel series titled Unidentified: Inside America’s U.F.O. Investigation produced by To the Stars features Elizondo and others who claim affiliation with AATIP.[14][15][16]

References[edit]

  1. "To The Stars Academy". To the Stars. 2017-10-10. Retrieved 2019-05-23.
  2. Cooper, Helene; Blumenthal, Ralph; Kean, Leslie (2017-12-16). "Glowing Auras and 'Black Money': The Pentagon's Mysterious U.F.O. Program". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2019-05-23.
  3. Blumenthal, Ralph (2017-12-18). "On the Trail of a Secret Pentagon U.F.O. Program". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2019-05-23.
  4. Cooper, Helene; Blumenthal, Ralph; Kean, Leslie (2017-12-16). "Glowing Auras and 'Black Money': The Pentagon's Mysterious U.F.O. Program". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2020-05-07.
  5. McMillan, Tim (2020-01-17). "The Tale of the Tape: The Long, Bizarre Saga of the Navy's UFO Video". Popular Mechanics. Retrieved 2020-05-07.
  6. Mellon, Christopher (March 9, 2018). "The military keeps encountering UFOs. Why doesn't the Pentagon care?". The Washington Post. Retrieved March 12, 2018.
  7. Cooper, Helene; Blumenthal, Ralph; Kean, Leslie (2019-05-26). "'Wow, What Is That?' Navy Pilots Report Unexplained Flying Objects". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2020-02-15.
  8. Cooper, Helene; Blumenthal, Ralph; Kean, Leslie (2017-12-16). "Glowing Auras and 'Black Money': The Pentagon's Mysterious U.F.O. Program". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2020-05-04.
  9. Paul, Deanna (2019-04-25). "How angry pilots got the Navy to stop dismissing UFO sightings". Washington Post.
  10. McMillan, Tim (2020-01-17). "The Tale of the Tape: The Long, Bizarre Saga of the Navy's UFO Video". Popular Mechanics. Retrieved 2020-05-07.
  11. "What Is Up With Those Pentagon UFO Videos?". Wired. ISSN 1059-1028. Retrieved 2020-05-07.
  12. "The Pentagon's UFOs: How a Multimedia Entertainment Company created a UFO news story". Skeptic. 2019-06-05. Retrieved 2020-05-07.
  13. Yuhas, Alan (2020-04-28). "The Pentagon Released U.F.O. Videos. Don't Hold Your Breath for a Breakthrough". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2020-05-07.
  14. "Watch Preview: Unidentified: Inside America's UFO Investigation: Aware Clip - Unidentified: Inside America's UFO Investigation". HISTORY. Retrieved 2019-05-29.
  15. Cooper, Helene; Blumenthal, Ralph; Kean, Leslie (2019-05-26). "'Wow, What Is That?' Navy Pilots Report Unexplained Flying Objects". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2019-05-29.
  16. "Interview with 'Unidentified: Inside America's UFO Investigation' with former Special Agent Luis Elizondo". We Are The Mighty. 2019-05-28. Retrieved 2019-05-29.


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