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Steve Turley

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Steve Turley
Steve Turley in studio.png Steve_Turley_in_studio.png
Turley in 2018
BornStephen Richard Turley
🏡 ResidenceNewark, Delaware
🏳️ Nationality
💼 Occupation
Adjunct instructor
🌐 Websiteturleytalks.com

Stephen Richard Turley is an American adjunct instructor of world music and aesthetics at Eastern University in St. Davids, Pennsylvania, New Testament scholar, and former classical guitarist. He also teaches theology and rhetoric at Tall Oaks Classical School.

Early life and education[edit]

Turley grew up in New Haven, Connecticut.[1] He attended college at the Peabody Conservatory where he studied under Ray Chester and Manuel Barrueco, and has had a minor career as a performing artist.[1][2]

In 2013, Turley received his Doctor of Philosophy from Durham University.[3]

Career[edit]

In the 1990s, Turley was a classical guitarist.[4] He later studied classical guitar at the Peabody Conservatory of Music.[5]

Since 1998, he has worked as an adjunct instructor at Eastern University in St. Davids, Pennsylvania, teaching world music and aesthetics.[4] Since 2002, Turley has taught theology, rhetoric, and Greek at Tall Oaks Classical School.[6][7]

In his 2018 book Beauty Matters: Creating a High Aesthetic in School Culture, Turley, an advocate of the classical education movement who teaches at a University and at a secondary school that are part of the classical Christian education movement,[7] argues that learning about classical ideas of the beautiful can teach students to understand Christian ideas of the good.[8]

Scholarship[edit]

According to William Scheick, who teaches early American literature at the University of Texas, in a 2008 article about the Jonathan Edwards sermon Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God, Turley argues that in the notable sermon, widely understood as emphasizing the afterlife, Edwards was actually speaking about a quotidian evangelical intensity he shared with his listeners.[9][10]

Books[edit]

  • The Ritualized Revelation of the Messianic Age: Washings and Meals in Galatians and 1 Corinthians, released by T&T Clark, 2015, is on the same subject as his doctoral dissertation.[11][12][13] Jan Heilmann of The Journal of Theological Studies wrote that Turley's work "is theoretically well grounded and an indispensable contribution to ritual studies and Pauline scholarship."[14] Catholic Biblical Quarterly's Wendell Willis added, "The author has added a dimension to the reading of Paul by employing approaches found in cognate fields of study, in this case ritual."[15]
  • Awakening Wonder: A Classical Guide to Truth, Goodness, and Beauty. Classical Academic Press, 2014.
  • Echoes of Eternity: A Classical Guide to Music. Classical Academic Press, 2018.
  • Classical vs. Modern Education: A Vision from C.S. Lewis. CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform, 2 November 2017.
  • Gazing: Encountering the Mystery of Art. CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform, 1 June 2018.
  • Classical vs. Modern Education: A Vision from C.S. Lewis. Canon Press, 7 April 2017.

Political commentator[edit]

A 2015 doctoral dissertation analyses a 2014 Turley essay on immigration in which Turley argues against cosmopolitan commitment to globalization and on the grounds that it deviates from traditional forms of religiosity, and national and local beliefs and practices. Drawing on the interpretations of Deuteronomy 10:18-19 by theologian James K. Hoffmeier, Turley draws a sharp distinction between legal and illegal immigrants, arguing that churches should aid, comfort, and "in effect adopt illegal immigrants and their families, help pay for lawyer's fees to make sure they get a fair hearing in the courts, and then provide the resources needed to help them fulfill the court’s decisions" (p.230). According to Benfel, Turley understands globalization as "in effect a worldwide social system constituted by the interaction between a capitalist economy, telecommunications, technology, and mass urbanization," that "is bringing an end to the whole concept of distinct nations." In Turley's view, "porous borders" and large scale immigration threaten the shared historic, linguistic, and religious heritage that is unique to each nation. He perceives reactions as, "in the face of threats to localized identity markers, people assert their religiosity, kinship, and national symbols as mechanisms of resistance against globalizing dynamics" (p.341).[16]

Writing in June 2016, Rod Dreher concurred with Turley's perception that nationalism is a growing phenomenon in Europe, but doubted Turley's claim that "A renewed Christian Europe may not be so far away."[17]

References[edit]

  1. 1.0 1.1 Harris, Larry (4 November 1991). "Peabody guitarist a crowd favorite in Italy". Baltimore Sun. Retrieved 19 September 2018.
  2. Davidson, Justin (11 July 1995). "Samples From Latin Folk Traditions". Newsday. Retrieved 16 September 2018. (subscription required)
  3. Turley, Stephen (2013). Revealing Rituals: Washings and Meals in Galatians and 1 Corinthians (PDF) (PhD). Durham University. Retrieved August 21, 2018.
  4. 4.0 4.1 "Stephen Turley, Ph.D." Eastern University. Retrieved August 20, 2018.
  5. Miller, Michael (November 29, 2017). "Member Spotlight: Steve Turley of TurleyTalks.com". Samaritan Ministries International. Retrieved August 21, 2018.
  6. "Tall Oaks Staff: Steve Turley". Reach Christian Schools. Retrieved August 20, 2018.
  7. 7.0 7.1 O'Conner, David (13 March 2010). "Veritas Seminar To Focus On Arts In Christian Education". Intelligencer Journal. |access-date= requires |url= (help)
  8. Gebhart, Tim (26 September 2018). "Teach Students About Beauty to Lead Them to Virtue". Epoch Times. Retrieved 26 September 2018.
  9. Scheick, William J. & Egan, Jim. "Literature to 1800." American Literary Scholarship, vol. 2008, 2008, pp. 213-231. Project MUSE, muse.jhu.edu/article/403414.
  10. Turley, Stephen Richard. “Awakened to the Holy: ‘Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God’ in Ritualized Context.” Christianity and Literature, vol. 57, no. 4, 2008, pp. 507–530. JSTOR, JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/44313851.
  11. Maston, Jason (December 22, 2016). "The Ritualized Revelation of the Messianic Age: Washings and Meals in Galatians and 1 Corinthians By Stephen Richard Turley". Religious Studies Review. 42 (4). Retrieved September 13, 2018. (subscription required)
  12. Leithart, Peter (October 26, 2015). "Baptism and the New World". Patheos. Retrieved September 13, 2018.
  13. Leithart, Peter (October 29, 2015). "Meals and the Gospel Truth". Patheos. Retrieved September 13, 2018.
  14. Heilmann, Jan (October 1, 2016). "The Ritualized Revelation of the Messianic Age: Washings and Meals in Galatians and 1 Corinthians. By Stephen Richard Turley". The Journal of Theological Studies. Oxford Academic. 67 (2). Retrieved September 13, 2018. (subscription required)
  15. Willis, Wendell (January 2017). "The Ritualized Revelation of the Messianic Age: Washings and Meals in Galatians and 1 Corinthians.". Catholic Biblical Quarterly. Catholic Biblical Association. p. 157–59. Retrieved September 20, 2018. (subscription required)
  16. Benfel, David (November 2015). Conservative Views on Undocumented Migration; Analysis of Traditionalist Conservative Articles, Stephen Turley, July 25 2013, Imaginative Conservative pp. 329-344. PhD dissertation Saybrook University. p. 329. Retrieved 16 September 2018. Search this book on Amazon.com Logo.png (subscription required)
  17. Dreher, Rod (30 June 2016). "The 'Re-Traditionalization' of Europe?". The American Conservative. Retrieved 16 September 2018.

External links[edit]


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