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Tengri Tribe

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Tengri Tribe
Тэнгэрийн овог
Languages: Old Tibetan, Mongolian
CountryEastern Göktürks, Syr-Tardush, Göktürks, Uyghurs, Tang Empire, Khitans, Liao empire
Current regionTibet
Place of originYarlung Dynasty
Founded620 c.
FounderTengri Khan
Final rulerDebun Mergen Khan
TitlesTsenpo, Khan
Connected familiesTibetan Empire
TraditionsBuddhism (official religion)
Dissolution945 c.
Cadet branchesBorjigin Clan
Khans of Tengri - Tribe

Government
• 
Tengri Khan in 620 c. (First)
• 
Borte Chino [it] Khan
• 
Batachi Khan [it]
• 
Tamacha Khan [it]
• 
Korichar Khan [it]
• 
Aujun Boroul [it] Khan
• 
Sali Kachau  [it] Khan
• 
Yeke Nidun [it] Khan
• 
Sam Sochi [it] Khan
• 
Karchu Khan [it]
• 
Borjigidai  [it] Khan
• 
Torokoljin Bayan [it] Khan
• 
Dobun Mergen Khan in 945 c. (Last)

The Tengri Tribe was founded by Tengri Khan in 600 c. and ruled circa (620 - 945 c.) The Tengri tribe was the predecessor of the Borjigin, founded by Bodonchar Munkhag after the death of his father, Dobun Mergen Khan, the last ruler of the Tengri, in 945 c.[citation needed]

The tribe was in power for 325 years from the 7th to the 10th century. The tribe had thirteen rulers, who used the titles Tsenpo and Khan. Another member of the Tengri tribe and Tibetan Empire was Tengri Khan's elder brother Songtsen Gampo, who founded the Empire in 618 c.[citation needed]

Rulers[edit]

Tengri Khan was the first khan of the Tengri, who founded the tribe in 620 c. He settled in the Eastern Turkic Khaganate (today China and Mongolia). Later groups associated with the Tengri were known as syr-Tardush, Göktürks, Uyghurs, the Tang Empire, Khitans, and the Liao dynasty.[citation needed]

Debun Mergen Khan, the last ruler of the Tengri Tribe, died in 945 c. The tribe was broken but Debun's son Bodonchar later restored it and founded a new tribe named Borjigin in 900 c.[clarification needed]

Name[edit]

The word Tengri is a historical anglicisation of the name of Tengri Khan, the founder of the tribe and a member of the Yarlung Clan (also known as the Yarlung dynasty).[citation needed]

The Mongol word for Tengri originally referred to the tribal followers of Yarlung in the 7th century. The word subsequently came to be used to refer to the tribe's military-administrative elite.[citation needed]

Origins[edit]

Tengri Khan was the son of the 32nd Emperor of Tibet, Namri Songtsen. according to History of book his real name was mysterious[clarification needed] Tengri Khan was born at end of the 6th century. He was the prince of the Yarlung dynasty and took the name Tengri Khan as his title at a young age on his father's death in 618 succeeded by his elder brother Songtsen Gampo and founded the Tibetan Empire in 618 and expanded to cover a large area.[citation needed]

Ancestry[edit]

Tengri Khan was the 31st generation from the first king of Tibet, Nyatri Tsenpo, who founded the Yarlung dynasty in 127 B.C.E[citation needed]

Descendants[edit]

After the last ruler of the Tengri tribe, Debun Mergen Khan, died in 945 c., Tengri Tribe rule ended. Debun's son Bodonchar founded a new tribe named Borjigin in 900 c. His descendants included the Mongol conqueror Chenghis Khan, and the Barlas tribe Mongol conqueror Amir Timur.[citation needed]

Stagnation[edit]

For 325 years The Tengri tribe had no war, and politics were peaceful. The tribe's rulers focused on administration, (Tengri Khan to Debun Mergen Khan) with only a few conflicts and battles.[citation needed]

Conflict with Tang Empire[edit]

In the middle of the 8th century the Tang Empire was fighting in Central Asia. At that time the Tengri tribe rose and conquered other tribes, then Tang empire captured the Tengri tribe and taxed them, and Tengri tribe became a protectorate of the Tang Empire.[citation needed]

Fall[edit]

On the death of Dobun Mergen Khan the tribe had struggles and big strong Tribe have loss the power the Tengri tribe expanded to other areas and tribes, and territory was lost and the Adviser[clarification needed] are backbeating the tribe was not end but the perfectly size was become normal,

Debun’s son Bodonchar Munkhag founded a new tribe named Borjigin in 900 c. The eighth ruler of the Borjigin tribe, Khabul Khan, founded the khamag Mongol in 1130 c., and the tribes were united and strong.[citation needed]

See also[edit]

  • Bodonchar Munkhag
  • Qarachar Noyan
  • Liao dynasty
  • Timurid Empire

References[edit]

  1. Japanese Agent in Tibet: My Ten Years of Travel in Disguise - Page 217 Missionary records mentioned the discovery of an isolated tribe speaking a Mongolian dialect in 1638, and I found a clan called the Tengri tribe living on the slopes of Mt. Tengri (tengri is Mongolian for 'blue sky'). By Hisao Kimura, Scott Berry[1]
  2. The China Review, Or, Notes and Queries on the Far East Other Tengri Tagh tribes, known E, now tendered submission. In 662 the Western Turks attacked FH, which district was, in fact, the old territory once occupied by the tribe, previously described. In the year 666, another expedition under ... by 國家圖書館出版社, 1885 - China[2]
  3. Introduction to the Science of Religion: Four Lectures ... - Page 338 Taic speech, 95 . of the departed worshipped 125 . among the Turanian tribes, 130 . Tâif, temple of, 113 : of nature worshipped among ... Spirit of Mongols called Tengri, tribes, 130 . Tate Mukuru, 45 note . on 135 note . SEPTEMBER 1882 . by Friedrich Max Müller Longmans, Green, 1882 - Electronic books - 341 pages[3]
  4. Southern Tibet: Discoveries in Former Times Compared with My FOUND INSIDE – PAGE 109 THE TURKI TRIBES IN NORTHERN TIBET . 109 stand on the water - parting of the great ... the presence of that wide spread tribe in Tibet . » Hodgson knew only one geographical name north of Nien - chen - tangla, namely, Tengri - nor . by Sven Anders Hedin Lithographic institute of the General staff of the Swedish army, 1917 - Geology[4]
  5. Fraser's Magazine - Volume 81 - Page 714 Tengri. And this is not all. By a for - gauge of China, and in the cognate, tunate accident the Turanian name though ... of Tengri can be traced back from some of the principal North Tuthe modern Mongolian to an earlier ranian tribes . Longmans, Green, and Company, 1870[5]
  6. Encyclopedia of the Peoples of Asia and Oceania: M to Z - Page 560 in both Inner and Outer Mongolia, much of FURTHER READING the structure of both the clan and tribe disap Thomas T. ... was often about deciding which man could most effectively claim the Montagnards See Dega. mandate of Tengri. Barbara A. West Facts On File, 2009 - Ethnology - 1002 pages[6]
  7. Hidden Tibet: History of Independence and Occupation - Page 12 and Namri Songtsen (570–620) fought for the unification of Tibetans into a single state. The latter, according to legend, had a hundred thousand strong army, which reached north to the territory of the Turki and south into Central India. During ...By Sergius L. Kuzmin[7]
  8. Hidden Tibet: History of Independence and Occupation - Page 11 The Yarlung Dynasty ruled presumably from 95 BC to 846 AD on the southeast of the Tibetan Plateau, including areas of Yarlung, Nyangpo, Kongpo and Powo. The dynasty had forty-two kings.4 Their biographies include a number of details ... by Sergius L. Kuzmin Library of Tibetan Works and Archives, Jan 1, 2011 - Education - 577 pages[8]
  9. The Circle of Bliss: Buddhist Meditational Art - Page 37 FOUND INSIDE – PAGE 37 Sometime at the end of the 6th or beginning of the 7th century, either under Namri Songtsen (? - ca. 629?) or his son Songtsen Gampo (r. 629-649?),* the valley state of Yarlung under the local kings asserted political control over V district. by John C. Huntington, Dina Bangdel Serindia Publications, Inc., 2003 - Art - 560 pages[9]

Sources[edit]

  1. Kimura, Hisao; Berry, Scott (1990). Japanese Agent in Tibet: My Ten Years of Travel in Disguise. Serindia Publications, Inc. ISBN 978-0-906026-24-3.
  2. The China Review, Or, Notes and Queries on the Far East. 國家圖書館出版社. 1885.
  3. Müller, Friedrich Max (1882). Introduction to the Science of Religion: Four Lectures Delivered at the Royal Institution in February and May, 1870. Longmans, Green.
  4. Hedin, Sven Anders (1917). Southern Tibet: Discoveries in Former Times Compared with My Own Researches in 1906-1908. Lithographic institute of the General staff of the Swedish army.
  5. Fraser's Magazine. Longmans, Green, and Company. 1870.
  6. West, Barbara A. (2009). Encyclopedia of the Peoples of Asia and Oceania: M to Z. Facts On File. ISBN 978-0-8160-7109-8.
  7. Kuzmin, Sergius L. (2011-01-01). Hidden Tibet: History of Independence and Occupation. Library of Tibetan Works and Archives. ISBN 978-93-80359-47-2.
  8. Kuzmin, Sergius L. (2011-01-01). Hidden Tibet: History of Independence and Occupation. Library of Tibetan Works and Archives. ISBN 978-93-80359-47-2.
  9. Huntington, John C.; Bangdel, Dina (2003). The Circle of Bliss: Buddhist Meditational Art. Serindia Publications, Inc. ISBN 978-1-932476-01-9.
  1. Kimura, Hisao; Berry, Scott (1990). Japanese Agent in Tibet: My Ten Years of Travel in Disguise. Serindia Publications, Inc. ISBN 978-0-906026-24-3. Search this book on Amazon.com Logo.png
  2. The China Review, Or, Notes and Queries on the Far East. 國家圖書館出版社. 1885. Search this book on Amazon.com Logo.png
  3. Müller, Friedrich Max (1882). Introduction to the Science of Religion: Four Lectures Delivered at the Royal Institution in February and May, 1870. Longmans, Green. Search this book on Amazon.com Logo.png
  4. Hedin, Sven Anders (1917). Southern Tibet: Discoveries in Former Times Compared with My Own Researches in 1906-1908. Lithographic institute of the General staff of the Swedish army. Search this book on Amazon.com Logo.png
  5. Fraser's Magazine. Longmans, Green, and Company. 1870. Search this book on Amazon.com Logo.png
  6. West, Barbara A. (2009). Encyclopedia of the Peoples of Asia and Oceania: M to Z. Facts On File. ISBN 978-0-8160-7109-8. Search this book on Amazon.com Logo.png
  7. Kuzmin, Sergius L. (2011-01-01). Hidden Tibet: History of Independence and Occupation. Library of Tibetan Works and Archives. ISBN 978-93-80359-47-2. Search this book on Amazon.com Logo.png
  8. Kuzmin, Sergius L. (2011-01-01). Hidden Tibet: History of Independence and Occupation. Library of Tibetan Works and Archives. ISBN 978-93-80359-47-2. Search this book on Amazon.com Logo.png
  9. Huntington, John C.; Bangdel, Dina (2003). The Circle of Bliss: Buddhist Meditational Art. Serindia Publications, Inc. ISBN 978-1-932476-01-9. Search this book on Amazon.com Logo.png


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