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Tricia Jenkins

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Tricia Jenkins is Associate Professor of Film, Television and Digital Media in the Bob Schieffer College of Communication at Texas Christian University, where she teaches courses in film history, genre studies, and media analysis.[1]

He research includes, among other things, the CIA's covert involvement in the development and production of Hollywood movies,[2][3] the culture and impact of the over-5000 international film festivals occurring around the world each year,[4] and Russian interference in the 2016 United States elections through social media.[5][6]

Background[edit]

Tricia Jenkins received her Ph.D. from Michigan State University, and attended Ambassador University,[7] founded by the apocalyptic cult The Worldwide Church of God, for her undergraduate education.

She lives in Fort Worth, Texas, and is married to poet and professor of English literature, Nat O'Reilly.

Research and Writing[edit]

Jenkins has published widely for both the public and the academy, in newspapers and magazines and for academic journals, such as The Washington Post,[8] Newsweek,[9] Cinema Journal,[10] Media, Culture & Society,[11] Journal of Popular Film & Television',[12] Historical Journal of Film, Radio and Television,[13] The Journal of Popular Culture,[14] and the Texas National Security Review.[15]

She edited International Film Festivals: Contemporary Cultures and History Beyond Venice and Cannes,[16] which surveys the scholarship on the growth and development of the over-5000 film festivals produced around the world each year, drawing on academic disciplines like urban studies, sociology, and film criticism. She covers both the well-known festivals like Cannes, Venice, Berlin, and Toronto, and also the growth of the smaller genre film festivals.[17]

She is the author of The CIA in Hollywood: How the Agency Shapes Film and Television,[18] which the CIA recommends to be read by its intelligence officers,[19] and which is considered the "best book out there . . .when it comes to the modern era of the CIA’s propagandistic role in entertainment."[20] The book gives an account of the intelligence agency's "unprecedented" actions to do “damage control” and bolster its image by establishing formal production and creative ties with Hollywood,[21] initially through the work of Chase Brandon,[22] an intelligence operations officer who acted as a liaison to Hollywood and who consulted on a number of film and TV scripts to further CIA interests.[23] She also recounts how Hollywood publicist Michael Sands secretly supported the CIA's involvement in Hollywood throughout the 1990s. Movies and TV shows that Jenkins claims were developed or influenced by the CIA include Argo,[24] The Bourne Identity, Alias, The Sum of All Fears, and The Recruit.[25]

Media and Public Appearances[edit]

Jenkins's work on CIA propaganda and its involvement in Hollywood has been profiled by a number of publications and organizations, such as the Los Angeles Review of Books,[26] The Center for the Study of Intelligence,[27] The Conversation,[28] the national security publication Lawfare,[29] NBC News,[30] Salon,[31] and The Independent.[32]

She has spoken widely on the topic at academic conferences (including the Lennox Seminar on Propaganda and Political Persuasion[33] at Trinity University[34]), and in the media, on television networks like Fox News, Al Jazeera,[35] and Public Radio International.[36]

Controversy[edit]

Jenkins has argued that the CIA's involvement in Hollywood has been so overreaching at times as to break U.S. laws[37] that make it illegal to use use government funds to engage in such propagandistic activity. Hayden Peake, curator of the CIA Historical Intelligence Collection,[38] calls her research "asserted but not proven."[39]

She has also argued that the CIA's work to influence Hollywood films and TV has been at times in violation of the First Amendment, because the CIA's access and support given to filmmakers is withdrawn filmmakers who refuse to capitulate to the CIA's demands,[40] a claim that conservative legal scholar Julias Taranto scoffed at.[41]

References[edit]

  1. "Bob Schieffer College of Communication | Tricia Jenkins". schieffercollege.tcu.edu. Retrieved 2019-08-26.
  2. "CIA influence on public opinion", Wikipedia, 2019-08-26, retrieved 2019-08-26
  3. Jenkins, Tricia (2009-05-20). "How the Central Intelligence Agency works with Hollywood: An interview with Paul Barry, the CIA's new Entertainment Industry Liaison". Media, Culture & Society. 31 (3): 489–495. doi:10.1177/0163443709102721.
  4. "Toronto International Film Festival Reading List". www.smithsonianjourneys.org. August 1, 2019. Retrieved 2019-08-26.
  5. "What Did Russian Trolls Want During the 2016 Election? A Closer Look at the Internet Research Agency's Active Measures". War on the Rocks. 2018-05-22. Retrieved 2019-08-26.
  6. "Texas Christian University Honors College | Honors Students Accompany Professor to Conference at Oxford". honors.tcu.edu. Retrieved 2019-08-26.
  7. "Bob Schieffer College of Communication | Tricia Jenkins". schieffercollege.tcu.edu. Retrieved 2019-08-26.
  8. Jenkins, Tricia (January 31, 2013). "When we cheer for our team, do we have to cheer for America, too?". Washington Post. Retrieved August 26, 2019.
  9. "In Opinion: How the CIA spooked Hollywood movies". Newsweek. 2016-08-06. Retrieved 2019-08-26.
  10. Jenkins, Tricia; Shaw, Tony (2017-01-07). "From Zero to Hero: The CIA and Hollywood Today". Cinema Journal. 56 (2): 91–113. doi:10.1353/cj.2017.0004. hdl:2299/18304. ISSN 2578-4919.
  11. Jenkins, Tricia (May 20, 2009). "How the Central Intelligence Agency works with Hollywood: An interview with Paul Barry, the CIA's new Entertainment Industry Liaison". Media, Culture & Society. 31 (3): 489–495. doi:10.1177/0163443709102721. ISSN 0163-4437.
  12. Jenkins, Tricia (2015-01-02). "Feminism, Nationalism, and the 1960s' Slender Spies: A Look at Get Smart and The Girl from U.N.C.L.E.". Journal of Popular Film and Television. 43 (1): 14–27. doi:10.1080/01956051.2014.961998. ISSN 0195-6051.
  13. Jenkins, Tricia (2009-06-01). "Get Smart: A Look at the Current Relationship between Hollywood and the CIA". Historical Journal of Film, Radio and Television. 29 (2): 229–243. doi:10.1080/01439680902890704. ISSN 0143-9685.
  14. Jenkins, Tricia (2011). "Nationalism and Gender: The 1970s, The Six Million Dollar Man, and The Bionic Woman". The Journal of Popular Culture. 44 (1): 93–113. doi:10.1111/j.1540-5931.2010.00821.x. ISSN 1540-5931.
  15. "What Did Russian Trolls Want During the 2016 Election? A Closer Look at the Internet Research Agency's Active Measures". War on the Rocks. 2018-05-22. Retrieved 2019-08-26.
  16. Jenkins, Tricia (November 2018). International film festivals : contemporary cultures and history beyond Venice and Cannes. Jenkins, Tricia. London. ISBN 9781788310901. OCLC 1027886737. Search this book on Amazon.com Logo.png
  17. "TIFF List". www.smithsonianjourneys.org. Retrieved 2019-08-26.
  18. Jenkins, Tricia. (2012). The CIA in Hollywood : how the agency shapes film and television (1st ed.). Austin: University of Texas Press. ISBN 9780292728615. OCLC 747947256. Search this book on Amazon.com Logo.png
  19. "Intelligence Officer's Bookshelf — Central Intelligence Agency". www.cia.gov. Retrieved 2019-08-26.
  20. "ClandesTime 078 - Chase Brandon: The CIA's Man in Hollywood". Spy Culture. 2016-04-24. Retrieved 2019-08-26.
  21. "Montesclaros on Jenkins, 'The CIA in Hollywood: How the Agency Shapes Film and Television' | H-War | H-Net". networks.h-net.org. Retrieved 2019-08-26.
  22. "ClandesTime 078 - Chase Brandon: The CIA's Man in Hollywood". Spy Culture. 2016-04-24. Retrieved 2019-08-26.
  23. ""The CIA in Hollywood: How the Agency Shapes Film and Television," by Tricia Jenkins". Lawfare. 2015-04-17. Retrieved 2019-08-26.
  24. McElwee, Sean A. (2013-04-29). "Propaganda and Censorship: The Hollywood Industrial Complex". Antiwar.com Original. Retrieved 2019-08-26.
  25. "The CIA's image in films has never been shinier". Retrieved 2019-08-26.
  26. Hayden, Tom. "The CIA Goes To Hollywood: How America's Spy Agency Infiltrated the Big Screen (and Our Minds)". Los Angeles Review of Books. Retrieved 2019-08-26.
  27. Peake, Hayden (March 2013). "Intelligence Officer's Bookshelf — Central Intelligence Agency Vol 67 No 1". www.cia.gov. Retrieved 2019-08-26.
  28. Alford, Matthew. "Washington DC's role behind the scenes in Hollywood goes deeper than you think". The Conversation. Retrieved 2019-08-26.
  29. ""The CIA in Hollywood: How the Agency Shapes Film and Television," by Tricia Jenkins". Lawfare. 2015-04-17. Retrieved 2019-08-26.
  30. "Opinion | Lynn Parramore: It's no coincidence that a white CIA agent plays a hero in 'Black Panther'". NBC News. Retrieved 2019-08-26.
  31. "When the CIA infiltrated Hollywood". Salon. 2013-02-28. Retrieved 2019-08-26.
  32. "Washington DC's role behind the scenes in Hollywood goes deeper than you think". The Independent. 2017-09-03. Retrieved 2019-08-26.
  33. "Propaganda – Lennox Seminar on Propaganda and Political Persuasion (Trinity University)". Retrieved 2019-08-26.
  34. "Tricia Jenkins – Propaganda". Retrieved 2019-08-26.
  35. "Covert operations: How the CIA works with Hollywood". www.aljazeera.com. Retrieved 2019-08-26.
  36. "CIA plays active role in managing its image in Hollywood films". Public Radio International. Retrieved 2019-08-26.
  37. Hornaday, Ann (February 24, 2012). "'Act of Valor' with real-life SEALs: new breed of war movie or propaganda?". Washington Post. Retrieved August 26, 2019.
  38. "Contributors — Central Intelligence Agency". www.cia.gov. Retrieved 2019-08-26.
  39. Peake, Hayden (September 2018). "Intelligence Officer's Bookshelf — Central Intelligence Agency Vol 62 No 3". www.cia.gov. Retrieved 2019-08-26.
  40. Jenkins, Tricia (2016-03-08). The CIA in Hollywood: How the Agency Shapes Film and Television. University of Texas Press. ISBN 9780292772465. Search this book on Amazon.com Logo.png
  41. ""The CIA in Hollywood: How the Agency Shapes Film and Television," by Tricia Jenkins". Lawfare. 2015-04-17. Retrieved 2019-08-26.

External links[edit]


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