Alvi (tribe)

From EverybodyWiki Bios & Wiki

Alvi علوی
علوی
Ahlul Sunnah.png
The symbol of Sunnis
Regions with significant populations
Arab world
India
Pakistan
Turkey
Languages
Arabic
Turkish
Urdu (Dakhini, Dehlavi)
Hindi (Haryanvi)
Religion
  • Sunni Islam
  • School: Hanafi
  • Creed: Maturidi
Related ethnic groups
Oghuz Turks, Muhajirs

Alvi (Arabic: علوي‎, Turkish: Alevi, Urdu: علوی‎), also transliterated as Alavi, Ansari (many of Alvis are married with Ansaris), and Syed (mixed with Alavis), are the descendants of Ali, the Prophet Muhammad's cousin.[1] mainly found in present-day Pakistan.[1] As a proper noun it is used by individuals, dynasties, places, and religious sects and organizations who identify as being either descendants of Ali, many of them are Sunni, also fallen to Shi'ism, Sunni Alvis can found mainly in Turkey, among ethnic Turks and Kurds.[2]

These Alavis are separated from Nusayri Alawites (and there belief, Alevism) and completely converted to Sunni Islam.

Alvis are the one who are the followers or descendants of Ali.[3] Therefore, some authors use Shiism synonymously with Alevism.[4] However, the descendants of Ali are not Shia, but the correct followers of Muhammad (the last messenger of Allah), who consider Ali as there fourth caliph of Islam (followed Sunni).[4] and although some Alvis are followers of Shiism. many Alvis were migrated to the Indian subcontinent and many other areas, to speard Islam.[citation needed] that included Shia, Sunni and Sufi beliefs that were adopted by some tribes and later integrated into Sunni Islam (correct version).[4]

Some Ottomans had oppressed Nusayri Alawites,[citation needed] attempting to convert them to Real version of Islam (Sunni Islam).[5] not the Sunni Alavis.

Ansari[edit]

Many Sunni Alavis had married mainly to Ansaris (the descendants of Abu Ayyub al-Ansari), and mixed with Ansari tribes, About the half of the Alvis descendants are mixed from Ansaris, called Ansari mix Alavis.[citation needed]

References[edit]

  1. 1.0 1.1 "Alvi Surname Origin".
  2. "Alevism". Harvard Divinity School Religious Literacy Project. Retrieved 2017-07-31.
  3. Jorgen S Nielsen Muslim Political Participation in Europe Edinburgh University Press 2013 ISBN 978-0-748-67753-5 Search this book on Amazon.com Logo.png. page 255
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 Rasim Ösgür Dönmez, Fazilet Ahu Özmen Gendered Identities: Criticizing Patriarchy in Turkey Lexington Books 2013 ISBN 978-0-739-17563-7 Search this book on Amazon.com Logo.png. page 150
  5. Seale, Patrick. Asad of Syria: The Struggle for the Middle East. With the assistance of Maureen McConville. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1989, c1988.


This article "Alvi (tribe)" is from Wikipedia. The list of its authors can be seen in its historical and/or the page Edithistory:Alvi (tribe). Articles copied from Draft Namespace on Wikipedia could be seen on the Draft Namespace of Wikipedia and not main one.