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Brian W. Carver

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Brian W. Carver
Brian Carver in May 2013 BrianCarverMay2013.jpg
Brian Carver in May 2013
Born (1974-06-13) June 13, 1974 (age 47)
Homewood, Alabama
🏡 ResidenceEmeryville, California
🏳️ Nationality
🎓 Alma materUniversity of California, Berkeley School of Law
💼 Occupation
American academic
👔 EmployerUniversity of California, Berkeley School of Information
TitleAssistant Professor
Term2008-present
👩 Spouse(s)Jacqueline Asher
👶 ChildrenTwo
🌐 Websiteischool.berkeley.edu/people/faculty/briancarver

Brian Carver (born June 13, 1974) is an American academic. He is an Assistant Professor at the University of California, Berkeley School of Information. His principal areas of study are copyright, internet law, commons-based peer production, and the Free Access to Law Movement. He has written and spoken about the challenges that new information technologies are posing for public policy as well as the factors that enable online communities to create public goods.

Career and community service[edit]

Education and career[edit]

Originally from a suburb of Birmingham, Alabama, Carver studied philosophy, receiving a B.A. from the University of Alabama[1] [2] and an M.A. from the University of California, Irvine.[3] He then taught philosophy at various community colleges in Southern California before receiving his J.D. from the University of California, Berkeley School of Law (Boalt Hall).[2]

Carver practiced law as a litigation associate with the Silicon Valley-based Fenwick & West before becoming an academic.[3] He is a member of the California State Bar, licensed to practice before all the state and federal courts of California, and the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit,[2] and has been pro bono counsel of record on amicus briefs filed on behalf of the Electronic Frontier Foundation, Public Knowledge, the American Library Association, and others.[4][5][6] He has been a member of the Berkeley faculty since 2008.[7]

Personal life[edit]

He has lived in California since 1996 and is married to Jacqueline "Jac" Asher, a UC Berkeley Lecturer in Gender & Women's Studies[8][9] and a member of the Emeryville City Council since 2011.[10] The couple live in Emeryville and have a daughter, born in 2005, and a son, born in 2008.[8]

Community service[edit]

Carver has been active in his community, serving as chair of the City of Emeryville's Childhood Development Center Advisory Committee from 2010-2012,[11] as chair of the Emery Unified School District's Citizens' Bond Oversight Committee from 2011-2012,[12] and as chair of the City of Emeryville's Parks and Recreation Committee from 2013 to present.[13] He is a member of the board of directors of the California League of Bond Oversight Committees (CaLBOC), a non-partisan non-profit that aims to improve the training and resources available to California's Proposition 39 school bond oversight committees.[14]

Non-Profit work[edit]

In 2013, he co-founded a California non-profit, Free Law Project, with former student, Michael Lissner. The organization seeks to provide free access to primary legal materials, develop legal research tools, and support academic research on legal corpora.[15] Free Law Project sponsors the development of the website, CourtListener.com, a searchable, open source, and open access database of over 2.5 million court opinions,[16] and the RECAP browser extensions which save users of the federal PACER system money while enabling them to contribute the documents they purchase to a free online archive of court documents.[17] Carver has spoken at numerous conferences about this work, often describing the organization's chief goal as putting the entirety of U.S. case law online, for the public, for free.[18]

Academic work[edit]

Brian Carver receiving an award at the 2011 Wikipedia in Higher Education Summit.

Carver has written about copyright law's first sale doctrine[19] and open source and free software licensing.[20] He is a co-editor of the fourth edition of Software and Internet Law, a case book used in internet and technology law courses.[21] In 2010 he taught a graduate seminar entitled Commons-based Peer Production[22] and in 2012 he taught the School of Information's first fully online course, Introduction to Information,[23] as part of a University of California-wide online initiative pilot project.[24] He was a member of the Technical Working Group of the Learning Resource Metadata Initiative, a project led by Creative Commons and the Association of Educational Publishers to establish a common vocabulary for describing learning resources[25] and is a member of the OASIS Legal Citation Markup (LegalCiteM) Technical Committee that is developing an open standard for machine-readable tagging of legal citations based upon a formalized conceptual model, vocabulary, metadata definitions, and prescribed syntax.[26]

Advising[edit]

He has advised School of Information Masters students on research projects covering online privacy[27] and the peer production of music metadata,[28] as well as a project that created a website to provide free public access to primary legal materials and legal research tools.[29]

Assigning Wikipedia[edit]

Carver has led his university classes in the creation and editing of Wikipedia articles since his Spring 2009 Cyberlaw class.[30] His students have now created or contributed to over 200 Wikipedia articles related to Cyberlaw and Intellectual Property law.[31] His Fall 2010 Intellectual Property Law course was part of the Wikimedia Foundation's Education Program pilot project on United States Public Policy[32][33][34] and his efforts are now part of Wikipedia's United States Education Program. At the 2011 Wikipedia in Higher Education Summit he spoke as part of a panel on the classroom experience and was presented with "The Perfect System Award" from the Wikimedia Foundation.[35] In 2012 he was selected to be a member of the Wikipedia Education Working Group, a group charged with planning the long-term structure of the Education Program in the United States and Canada. Carver has also published academic work about his experiences assigning students to edit Wikipedia.[36][37]

References[edit]

  1. "Who are some of your successful majors?". Department of Philosophy. University of Alabama. Retrieved 24 May 2013.
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 "Attorney Profile: Brian W. Carver". State Bar of California. Retrieved 24 May 2013.
  3. 3.0 3.1 "About: Brian W. Carver". Cyberlaw Cases. Retrieved 24 May 2013.
  4. "Brief of Amici Curiae American Library Association, Association of College and Research Libraries, Association of Research Libraries, Consumer Federation of America, Electronic Frontier Foundation, Public Knowledge, and U.S. PIRG in Support of Petition for Writ of Certiorari". Vernor v. Autodesk, Inc. No. 10-1421 (Supreme Court of the United States Jun. 20, 2011). Retrieved 24 May 2013.
  5. "Brief of Amici Curiae Electronic Frontier Foundation, Public Knowledge, American Library Association, Association of Research Libraries, and Association of College and Research Libraries" (PDF). Vernor v. Autodesk, Inc. No. 09-35969 (9th Cir. Oct. 12, 2010). Retrieved 24 May 2013.
  6. "Brief of Amici Curiae Public Knowledge" (PDF). MDY Indus. LLC v. Blizzard Ent., Inc. No. 09-15932 (9th Cir. Sep. 23, 2009). Retrieved 24 May 2013.
  7. "Faculty Profile: Brian W. Carver". School of Information. University of California, Berkeley. Retrieved 24 May 2013.
  8. 8.0 8.1 "About Jac". Jacqueline Asher for Emeryville City Council. Retrieved 24 May 2013.
  9. "Faculty Profile of Jacqueline Asher". Department of Gender & Women's Studies. University of California, Berkeley. Retrieved 24 May 2013.
  10. "Council Members: Vice Mayor Jac Asher". City of Emeryville, California. Retrieved 24 May 2013.
  11. "Child Development Center Advisory Committee". City of Emeryville, California. Retrieved 24 May 2013.
  12. "Citizens' Oversight Committee". Emery Unified School District. Retrieved 24 May 2013.
  13. "Parks and Recreation Committee". City of Emeryville, California. Retrieved 24 May 2013.
  14. "Board of Directors". California League of Bond Oversight Committees (CaLBOC). Retrieved 24 May 2013.
  15. "Free Law Project". Free Law Project. Retrieved 8 September 2014.
  16. "CourtListener". Free Law Project. Retrieved 8 September 2014.
  17. "RECAP". Princeton University Center for Information Technology Policy and Free Law Project. Retrieved 8 September 2014.
  18. "Forging an Open Legal Document Ecosystem". Stanford University Codex FutureLaw 2014. Retrieved 8 September 2014.
  19. Carver, Brian (2010). "Why License Agreements Do Not Control Copy Ownership: First Sales and Essential Copies". Berkeley Tech. L. J. 25: 1887.
  20. Carver, Brian (2005). "Share and Share Alike: Understanding and Enforcing Open Source and Free Software Licenses". Berkeley Tech. L. J. 20: 443.
  21. Mark Lemley, Peter Menell, Robert Merges, Pamela Samuelson, and Brian Carver (2011). Software and Internet Law. Aspen Publishers. ISBN 978-0-7355-8915-5. Search this book on Amazon.com Logo.png
  22. Carver, Brian. "Commons-based Peer Production Syllabus". School of Information. University of California, Berkeley. Retrieved 24 May 2013.
  23. "School of Information Kicks Off Its First Fully Online Course". School of Information. University of California, Berkeley. Retrieved 24 May 2013.
  24. "Courses Selected for Development". Online Initiative Pilot Project. University of California Office of the President. Retrieved 24 May 2013.
  25. "Technical Working Group". Learning Resources Metadata Initiative. Creative Commons. Retrieved 24 May 2013.
  26. "OASIS Legal Citation Markup (LegalCiteM) Technical Committee - Membership". OASIS. Retrieved 9 October 2014.
  27. Helft, Miguel (June 2, 2009). "Google is Top Tracker of Surfers in Study". The New York Times.
  28. "2011 Commencement Award Winners". School of Information. University of California, Berkeley. Retrieved 24 May 2013.
  29. Ambrogi, Robert (April 18, 2011). "A La Carte E-Mail Alerts Delivered Free". Texas Lawyer. Retrieved 24 May 2013.
  30. Jones, Nicole (November 29, 2011). "Colleges take a chance on Wikipedia". KALW Radio.
  31. "User:Brianwc". Wikipedia User Page. Retrieved 24 May 2013.
  32. "Students help improve Wikipedia's credibility". Media Relations. University of California, Berkeley. Retrieved 24 May 2013.
  33. Chapman, Paige (November 3, 2010). "Professors Shore Up Wikipedia Entries on Public Policy". Chronicle of Higher Education.
  34. Wertheim, Jillian (November 8, 2010). "Berkeley Students Make Wiki (Even More) Legit". The Daily Cal.
  35. Coetzee, Derrick. "File:Brian Carver accepting Wikimedia award.jpg". Wikimedia Commons File.
  36. Carver, Brian W. (2012). "Assigning Students to Edit Wikipedia: four case studies". E-Learning and Digital Media. 9 (3): 273–283. doi:10.2304/elea.2012.9.3.273. Retrieved 24 May 2013. Unknown parameter |coauthors= ignored (|author= suggested) (help)
  37. Roth, Amy (2013). "Assigning Wikipedia editing: Triangulation toward understanding university student engagement". First Monday. 18 (6). doi:10.5210/fm.v18i6.4340. Retrieved 10 June 2013. Unknown parameter |coauthors= ignored (|author= suggested) (help); Unknown parameter |month= ignored (help)

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