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Frederick P. Lenz Foundation for American Buddhism

From EverybodyWiki Bios & Wiki
The Frederick P. Lenz Foundation for American Buddhism
Formation1998; 22 years ago (1998)
FieldsPhilanthropy
Websitefredericklenzfoundation.org

The Frederick P. Lenz Foundation for American Buddhism is an organization based in the United States that aims to foster the growth and development of Buddhism in America.[1] It does this by supporting organizations and initiatives that range from Buddhist study to community social outreach, as well as offering scholarships and hosting conferences.[1] The Frederick P. Lenz Foundation for American Buddhism was founded in 1998.[2] Since its formation, the Frederick P. Lenz Foundation for American Buddhism has provided approximately $7 million USD in grants to around one hundred organizations.[3] The foundation has widened its range of grant-giving to include non-Buddhist organizations that offer meditation and mindfulness programs.[4] Grant categories include Buddhist scholarship,[5] prisons and the justice system,[6][7] support for minorities and people of color,[7] meditation and mindfulness (both Buddhist and non-Buddhist),[8][9][10] and women in Buddhism.[11] The Lenz Foundation has hosted a series of conferences for the benefit of its grantees and the public—from collaboration training to fundraising and sustainability skills.[12]


References[edit]

  1. 1.0 1.1 Atwood, Haleigh (Summer 2019). "Philanthropy: The New Dana" (PDF). Buddhadharma: The Practitioner's Quarterly. Retrieved 28 June 2019. The Frederick P. Lenz Foundation for American Buddhism supports a vast variety of organizations and initiatives, from study and community outreach to scholarships and conferences.
  2. State of New York Department of State (13 August 2001). Certificate of Incorporation.
  3. Atwood, Haleigh (Summer 2019). "Philanthropy: The New Dana" (PDF). Buddhadharma: The Practitioner's Quarterly. Retrieved 28 June 2019. Over the years, Lenz Foundation has given close to $7 million in grants to more than one hundred organizations.
  4. Atwood, Haleigh (Summer 2019). "Philanthropy: The New Dana" (PDF). Buddhadharma: The Practitioner's Quarterly. Retrieved 28 June 2019. The foundation has also broadened its scope of grantees to include non-Buddhist organizations that offer contemplative programs, such as the Institute of Jewish Spirituality.
  5. Atwood, Haleigh (Summer 2019). "Philanthropy: The New Dana" (PDF). Buddhadharma: The Practitioner's Quarterly. Retrieved 28 June 2019. One of the foundation’s largest area of funding is education, supporting study, outreach, and scholarships at institutions with established Buddhist studies programs. Naropa University in Boulder, Colorado, is the foundation’s longest sustaining grantee, with funds largely going toward scholarships and programs. Other institutions supported by Lenz Foundation include Brown University, NYU, and UC Berkeley.
  6. Maull, Fleet (2015). "Letter from PMI/PDN Founder Fleet Maull" (PDF). Prison Mindfulness Institute. Retrieved 28 June 2019. Our Mindful Justice Initiative (MJI) (www.mindfuljustice.org), a collaboration catalyzed with training and funding from the Frederick P. Lenz Foundation in 2014, reached new heights in 2015. With funding from the Fetzer Institute and continued support from the Lenz Foundation, we gathered 24 influential leaders from the full spectrum of the U.S. criminal justice system at the Fetzer Institute’s Seasons Conference Center in September 2015 to explore mindfulness-based, smart on crime, front to back strategies for transforming our broken criminal justice system into a more humane, effective, compassionate and economically sustainable approach to enhancing public safety and lifting up those who are falling through the cracks in our social fabric.
  7. 7.0 7.1 "Black and Buddhist in America". Lions Roar. 22 October 2018. Retrieved 28 June 2019. The teachers answered audience questions including on the importance of black Buddhists coming together, how Buddhists can engage as activists in issues of social justice, and the challenges they’ve faced as people of color in the Buddhist tradition. The Gathering was co-hosted by Lion’s Roar and Union Theological Seminary’s Thích Nhất Hạnh Program for Engaged Buddhism, with support from the Arthur Vining Davis Foundations, the Hemera Foundation, and the Frederick P. Lenz Foundation.
  8. Brady, Jeff (13 October 2009). "Military Buddhist Chapel Represents Tolerance". NPR. Retrieved 28 June 2019. The military also has made efforts to accommodate all faiths. These include the construction of the 300-square-foot Buddhist chapel at the Air Force Academy paid for by the Frederick P. Lenz Foundation for American Buddhism.
  9. Emery, Erin (29 October 2007). "A place to find peace". The Denver Post. Retrieved 28 June 2019. The $85,000 to construct the space, and an additional $10,000 a year for the next five years to operate the chapel, was provided by The Frederick P. Lenz Foundation for American Buddhism and Friends of Zen. No tax dollars were used on construction.
  10. "Mindfulness class helped women, but not men, overcome 'negative affect'". ScienceDaily. 20 April 2017. Retrieved 28 June 2019. The National Institutes of Health, the Mind and Life Institute, the Lenz Foundation, the Hershey Foundation and the Brown University Contemplative Studies Initiative funded the research.
  11. Atwood, Haleigh (Summer 2019). "Philanthropy: The New Dana" (PDF). Buddhadharma: The Practitioner's Quarterly. Retrieved 28 June 2019. The foundation also supports Buddhist publications, meditation resources, mindfulness programs, women in Buddhism, Buddhist palliative care, retreat centers, and Buddhist ministry in justice systems.
  12. Atwood, Haleigh (Summer 2019). "Philanthropy: The New Dana" (PDF). Buddhadharma: The Practitioner's Quarterly. Retrieved 28 June 2019. Lenz Foundation has hosted a series of conferences that offer a range of resources, from collaboration training to fundraising and sustainability instruction.

External links[edit]


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