Information Assurance Advisory Council

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Information Assurance Advisory Council
AbbreviationIAAC
Formation1999
TypeProfessional association
PurposeAdvancing Information Assurance to ensure the robustness, resilience and security of the United Kingdom
Location
  • 1st Floor Block D, North Star House, North Star Avenue, Swindon, Wiltshire, SN2 1FA
Region served
UK
Official language
English
Key people
  • Lord James Arbuthnot (Chair, IAAC)
  • Louisa-Jayne O’Neill (Vice-Chair, IAAC)
  • Nigel Jones (CEO, IAAC)[1]
  • David Wilkinson (Chair, IAAC Access)[2]
  • Ese Oduyoye (Vice-Chair, IAAC Access)
Main organ
IAAC Management Committee
WebsiteIAAC

The Information Assurance Advisory Council, informally known as IAAC, is a not-for-profit research organisation that brings together public, private, academic and other sectors in the United Kingdom.

History[edit]

The Information Assurance Advisory Council was set up in 2000[3] by Baroness Neville-Jones who chaired the organisation until 2007.[4] She was succeeded by Lieutenant General Sir Edmund Burton, who remained in the post until Lord James Arbuthnot's appointment in 2017.

IAAC’s operating strategy calls for “recognition that no single UK sector can create a safe and secure information society by itself”. [5] As such, a large proportion of the group’s activities are centred around bringing together Government, the private sector, academia, and others.

As of 2016, IAAC was funded almost entirely through sponsorship by major UK and international organisations. These include defence companies Northrop Grumman, Raytheon, Fortinet, Nexor, Dtex Systems, Ultra Electronics, and Sopra Steria; as well as major national infrastructure companies including British Telecom, O2; and large employers such as GlaxoSmithKline. [6]

Membership[edit]

Its corporate members aside, The Information Assurance Advisory Council houses two liaison groups that aim to improve the flow of information between sectors, and organisations within sectors.

IAAC’s government liaison panel consists of the British Foreign Office, Ministry of Defence, National Crime Agency, BIS, CESG, CPNI, and Office of Cyber Security and Information Assurance (OCSIA). [7]

IAAC’s academic liaison panel comprises some 40 British universities, including the University of Cambridge, the University of Oxford’s Oxford Internet Institute, King’s College London, Imperial College London, the London School of Economics and Political Science, the Defence College for Communications and Information Systems, and Cranfield University. [8]

Activities[edit]

Annual conference[edit]

The 2013 conference focused on new horizons in Information Assurance. [9] The 2014 conference examined developing available opportunities in the sector.[10] The organisation's 2015 conference looked at the role of individuals in the growing Internet of Things.[11] 2016's conference was entitled "Addressing the boundary issues: managing security in an interdependent and international context".[12]

Original research[edit]

Both independently and alongside partners such as RAND Corporation, the Information Assurance Advisory Council has conducted and published research on a variety of subject areas related to matters of information assurance.[13] The organisation's programmes featured in the UK Government's 2010-2015 Cyber Security Strategy.[14] They have also received coverage in national and international mainstream media.[15]

IAAC Access[edit]

In 2016, IAAC launched its Access Group to provide a home for early-stage professionals working in information assurance and related disciplines in the UK.[16] According to the IAAC website, it hosts events on topics of relevance to information assurance and facilitates networking between members and sponsors, aiming to promote the status and importance of information assurance in society.[17]

IAAC Regional Initiatives[edit]

In May 2017, IAAC's first regional initiative, IAAC North-West, was officially launched at The University of Chester.

Public outreach[edit]

As part of its attempts to improve understanding and the quality of debate around information assurance practices in the UK, the organisation has at times taken a more direct role, addressing relevant current affairs issues in news media, and actively engaging the public. [18] [19] [20]

See also[edit]

  • UK Cyber Security Community
  • UK National Cyber Security Centre

References[edit]

  1. "Our Team". The Information Assurance Advisory Council. Retrieved November 1, 2016.
  2. "IAAC Access". The Information Assurance Advisory Council. Retrieved November 1, 2016.
  3. "Symantec Co-Sponsors New UK E-Commerce Information Assurance Forum". Symantec. Retrieved 1 November 2016.
  4. "IAAC - Neville-Jones".
  5. "Business Strategy". The Information Assurance Advisory Council. Retrieved 1 November 2016.
  6. "IAAC Sponsors". The Information Assurance Advisory Council. Retrieved 1 November 2016.
  7. "Government Liaison Panel". The Information Assurance Advisory Council. Retrieved 1 November 2016.
  8. "Academic Liaison Panel". The Information Assurance Advisory Council. Retrieved 1 November 2016.
  9. "IAAC Symposium 2013". The British Computing Society. Retrieved 1 November 2016.
  10. "IAAC Symposium 2014". The Information Assurance Advisory Council. Retrieved 2 November 2016.
  11. "IAAC Symposium 2015". The Information Assurance Advisory Council. Retrieved 2 November 2016.
  12. "IAAC Symposium 2016". The Information Assurance Advisory Council. Retrieved 2 November 2016.
  13. "Engaging the Board: Corporate Governance and Information Assurance" (PDF). RAND Corporation. Retrieved 2 November 2016.
  14. "2010 to 2015 government policy: cyber security". GOV.UK. Retrieved 2 November 2016.
  15. "Identity fraud to rise once new Government databases are set up". The Telegraph. Retrieved 1 November 2016.
  16. "IAAC Access Launch". The Information Assurance Advisory Council. Retrieved 2 November 2016.
  17. "IAAC Access". The Information Assurance Advisory Council. Retrieved 1 November 2016.
  18. "How Terror Talk is Tracked". BBC News. Retrieved 1 November 2016.
  19. "Hackers target patient records". The Sunday Express. Retrieved 1 November 2016.
  20. "Job seekers warned over CV theft". BBC News. Retrieved 1 November 2016.

External links[edit]


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