Lifefolder

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Lifefolder
Artificial intelligence
ISIN🆔
IndustrySuicide, euthanasia, end-of-life, logistics of dying, emotional intelligence, artificial intelligence, health care
Founded 📆
Founder 👔Haje Jan Kamps
Defunct2017
Area served 🗺️
Worldwide
OwnerHaje Jan Kamps, Colin Liotta
Members
Number of employees
🌐 Website[Lua error in Module:WikidataIB at line 665: attempt to index field 'wikibase' (a nil value). ] 
📇 Address
📞 telephone

Lifefolder was a company created in 2017 by photographer, businessman and inventor Haje Jan Kamps, and artist and developer Colin Liotta, two San Francisco Bay Area entrepreneurs.[1][2][3] Lifefolder was featured on the 2018 Yearbook of the Digital Ethics Lab,[4] which is an overview of cutting-edge research areas within digital ethics as defined by the Digital Ethics Lab of the University of Oxford, one of the leading universities of the world.[5] According to the University of Oxford's official website, the Digital Ethics Lab is a multidisciplinary research and teaching department of the University of Oxford, dedicated to the social science of the Internet.[6]

Lifefolder and its Facebook messenger chatbot Emily received some media coverage during 2017.[7][8][9][10][11][12][13][14][15] Emily chatbot was featured on the book Hands-On Chatbots and Conversational UI Development : Build chatbots and voice user interfaces with Chatfuel, Dialogflow, Microsoft Bot Framework, Twilio, and Alexa Skills (Phil D Hall and Vamsi Venigalla publishing houses).[16]

History[edit]

Lifefolder [17][18] was known for having launched Emily,[19][20] a Facebook Messenger chatbot designed to help people with end of life planning in North Carolina. Using artificial intelligence, Lifefolder aimed to normalize talking about death and prepare for the logistics of dying.[21][11][22][23] Through Lifefolder, Kamps sought to help people to work through the complicated emotional landscape that lies behind the question of ending one's life, that prevent people from thinking and talking about it.[24][25][26][27] The inspiration behind the program came from its creator's own experience with his mother-in-law suffering a stroke and surviving. This event got Emily's maker thinking about end of life plans and how few conversations people have concerning their last wishes.[12]

At the end, the Emily chatbot emailed you a PDF (only legally binding in certain states) indicating who you want your decision-making proxy to be in an end-of-life situation, and describing one's wishes. It's not a medical document saying you want a particular treatment, but a description of what you'd like your loved ones to keep in mind. For example, the bot asked whether one would like people to talk to you even if they were not sure whether you understand. And one could play a grim game of 'would you rather' (although Emily phrases it much more nicely) deciding things like whether one'd rather be dead or in constant pain.[15] On its official website, the company stated that they specifically produce an Advance Care Directive document which explains your specific wishes. Lifefolder created an organ donation statement that specified if and how a person would like his organs used. We also help people appoint one or more Health Proxies. This was the person(s) one'd like to act on his behalf if the time comes.[3]

References[edit]

  1. "LifeFolder - Crunchbase Company Profile & Funding". Crunchbase. Retrieved 2020-12-17.
  2. Seipel, Tracy (2017-07-03). "Meet Emily, the bot that helps you talk about your end of life wishes". Silicon Valley. Retrieved 2020-12-17. Unknown parameter |url-status= ignored (help)
  3. 3.0 3.1 "LifeFolder". web.archive.org. 2017-11-23. Retrieved 2020-12-18.
  4. The 2018 yearbook of the Digital Ethics Lab. Öhman, Carl,, Watson, David,. Cham. ISBN 978-3-030-17152-0. OCLC 1123217403. Search this book on Amazon.com Logo.png
  5. Burr, Christopher; Milano, Silvia, eds. (2020). The 2019 Yearbook of the Digital Ethics Lab. Digital Ethics Lab Yearbook. Springer International Publishing. ISBN 978-3-030-29144-0. Search this book on Amazon.com Logo.png
  6. "OII | Digital Ethics Lab — Oxford Internet Institute". www.oii.ox.ac.uk. Retrieved 2020-12-18.
  7. "Los robots se cuelan en las relaciones". La Vanguardia (in español). 2018-03-26. Retrieved 2020-12-18.
  8. "Μίλησα με ένα ρομπότ για τον θάνατό μου". LiFO (in Ελληνικά). Retrieved 2020-12-18.
  9. "Meet Emily, the bot that helps you talk about your end-of-life wishes". The Mercury News. 2017-07-03. Retrieved 2020-12-18.
  10. "New chatbot 'Emily' helps you talk about death". abc10.com. Retrieved 2020-12-18.
  11. 11.0 11.1 Vatomsky, Sonya (2017-11-27). "You're Going to Die—and This Bot Wants to Help You Prepare For It". Men's Health. Archived from the original on 2019-03-05. Retrieved 2020-12-14. Unknown parameter |url-status= ignored (help)
  12. 12.0 12.1 "New Chatbot Strives to Make It Easier for People to Make End of Life Decisions". OC Wills & Trusts Attorneys. 2017-07-14. Retrieved 2020-12-18.
  13. "Chatbots: Qué son, cómo crearlos y ejemplos prácticos". Luis F. López Sánchez (in español). 2017-10-09. Retrieved 2020-12-18.
  14. "US company LifeFolder aims to support people with end-of-life planning | Technology & AI | Healthcare Global". www.healthcareglobal.com. Retrieved 2020-12-18.
  15. 15.0 15.1 "This Facebook Bot Will Help You Plan Your Death". Vitals. Retrieved 2020-12-18.
  16. Janarthanam, Srini. (2017). Hands-On Chatbots and Conversational UI Development : Build chatbots and voice user interfaces with Chatfuel, Dialogflow, Microsoft Bot Framework, Twilio, and Alexa Skills. Hall, Phil D., Venigalla, Vamsi. Birmingham: Packt Publishing. pp. 15, 21. ISBN 978-1-78829-833-9. OCLC 1020026738. Search this book on Amazon.com Logo.png
  17. "Chatbot apps help users prepare for death". BBC News. Retrieved 2020-12-16.
  18. Business, Journal of Beautiful (2017-09-15). "Human of Beautiful Business: Haje Jan Kamps, Co-Founder and CEO, LifeFolder". Medium. Archived from the original on 2020-12-15. Retrieved 2020-12-14. Unknown parameter |url-status= ignored (help)
  19. Öhman, Carl; Watson, David (2019-10-10). The 2018 Yearbook of the Digital Ethics Lab. Springer Nature. p. 171. ISBN 978-3-030-17152-0. Archived from the original on 2020-12-15. Retrieved 2020-12-14. Unknown parameter |url-status= ignored (help) Search this book on Amazon.com Logo.png
  20. MOLST, advance directive, being mortal, death, dying, wills, hospice, healthcare proxy, advance care planning. "Meet Emily". GoodEnding Org. Archived from the original on 2020-12-15. Retrieved 2020-12-15. Unknown parameter |url-status= ignored (help)
  21. "AI Robot Takes the Burden Out of End-of-Life Conversations - Debra Lee - EdLab". EdLab, Teachers College Columbia University. 2017-09-08. Retrieved 2020-12-14.
  22. "Emily bot walks you through end-of-life decisions". VentureBeat. 2017-06-20. Archived from the original on 2020-11-14. Retrieved 2020-12-14. Unknown parameter |url-status= ignored (help)
  23. LifeFolder. "LifeFolder launches chatbot to help people with end of life planning in North Carolina". www.prnewswire.com. Archived from the original on 2017-08-10. Retrieved 2020-12-14. Unknown parameter |url-status= ignored (help)
  24. Business, Journal of Beautiful (2017-09-15). "Human of Beautiful Business: Haje Jan Kamps, Co-Founder and CEO, LifeFolder". Medium. Retrieved 2020-12-17.
  25. Kamps, Haje Jan (2020-03-10). ""Be Well."". Medium. Retrieved 2020-12-17.
  26. Kamps, Haje Jan. Pitch perfect : raising capital for your startup. [Berkeley, CA]. ISBN 978-1-4842-6065-4. OCLC 1198146126. Search this book on Amazon.com Logo.png
  27. Öhman, Carl (2019), Öhman, Carl; Watson, David, eds., "From Bones to Bytes: A New Chapter in the History of Death", The 2018 Yearbook of the Digital Ethics Lab, Cham: Springer International Publishing, pp. 167–182, doi:10.1007/978-3-030-17152-0_11, ISBN 978-3-030-17151-3, retrieved 2020-12-17


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