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Middle-earth dwarf characters

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Many of the fictional characters in J.R.R. Tolkien's legendarium are Dwarves, a short stocky race inhabiting the world of Arda (the Earth in an imagined mythological past). Dwarves lived in the continent Middle-earth, mostly under its mountains.

The names of many of Tolkien's Dwarves are derived from Norse mythology. Tolkien did not use diacritical marks for any names in The Hobbit, but in The Lord of the Rings he accentuated a number of names, including some which had appeared in The Hobbit. Thus, for example, Fili became F铆li, and Thrain became Thr谩in.

Thorin's company[edit]

Thorin's company consisted of the following 13 dwarves; their quest in The Hobbit is the main impetus of the plot of that story. Their quest, which occurred in T.A. 2941, was joined by Bilbo Baggins (a hobbit) and occasionally by the wizard Gandalf.

Thorin II Oakenshield[edit]

Thorin II Oakenshield (T.A. 2746 鈥 2941) was the King of Durin's Folk who led the expedition to destroy Smaug in T.A. 2941 and was slain in the Battle of Five Armies.

In film and other media[edit]

In Peter Jackson's The Hobbit film trilogy, Thorin is portrayed by Richard Armitage.

Balin[edit]

Balin (T.A. 2763 鈥 2994) was one of the twelve companions of Thorin and Bilbo Baggins on the Quest of Erebor. He wore a scarlet hood. He and his younger brother, Dwalin, were the sons of Fundin, and thus of the royal line of Durin. In the course of the Quest, Balin was the Dwarf who developed the closest friendship with Bilbo.[1]

Many years after the death of Smaug, Balin led an expedition to recolonize Khazad-d没m. Although the colony began well, Balin was slain after only a few years, shot by Orcs as he looked into Kheled-z芒ram.

Twenty-four years later his tomb and the Book of Mazarbul that told of his expedition and death were discovered by the Fellowship of the Ring.

In film and other media[edit]

Balin is portrayed by Ken Stott in Peter Jackson's film version of The Hobbit. He is characterized as an advisor and fatherly friend to Thorin, and is also鈥攁long with Thorin鈥攐ne of the only Dwarves who witnessed Smaug's attack on the Lonely Mountain firsthand. In the course of the film trilogy, he also becomes very affectionate with Bilbo, who would on occasion turn to him for some advice on the Dwarves, and he was the one guiding him to the inside of the Lonely Mountain to try to find the Arkenstone.

Bifur[edit]

Bifur was one of the twelve companions of Thorin and Bilbo on the Quest of Erebor. Like other members of the company, his name comes directly from the Old Norse poem "V枚lusp谩", part of the Poetic Edda; see also wikt:Bifurr. The forefathers of all the Dwarves of Thorin's company came from Moria, but (unlike the rest of the company) Bifur and his cousins Bofur and Bombur are not of the royal line of Durin.

Bifur was fond of raspberry jam and apple-tart at the unexpected party in Bag End, where he wore a yellow hood and played the clarinet. He gave the trolls quite a fight before getting sacked and helped to try to rescue Bilbo, and was set down uncomfortably near the fire as a reward.

As the result of the Quest, Bifur and his cousins each received a share of the fabulous hoard of Erebor, where they lived the rest of their days. They were all alive and well many years after the Quest, as reported in The Fellowship of the Ring by Gl贸in to Frodo Baggins, on the eve of the Council of Elrond.

In film and other media[edit]

In The Hobbit film series by Peter Jackson Bifur is portrayed by New Zealand actor William Kircher, who also played Tom the Troll in The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey. In the backstory of films, Bifur suffers an injury during a battle, which leaves him with an Orcish axe stuck in his head. As a result, Bifur is only able to speak in Khuzdul, the ancient Dwarvish language, though he remains capable as both a manic fighter and a gentle toymaker. Kircher himself embraced the idea of an injury, stating that it helped him develop a character: "I went and started researching what that kind of injury can do to you. It's kind of like getting a stroke, so it can affect their speech and the way they think, and they zone out, so I thought, I'll really go for it." Kircher also interpreted Bifur's personal journey throughout the films as a quest to find the particular orc who gave him the injury, so that he can give it back.[2] Near the ending of The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies, the axe in Bifur's head is gone. In the Extended edition of it, Bifur lunges himself at an orc to save Bofur, getting the axe in his head stuck to the orc's head. Bofur and Bombur help pull him off and push the orc off a cliff. Bombur pulls the orc down, releasing them both, and the axe on Bifur's head is gone. Bombur rushes to them and gives the axe head to Bifur. Bifur looks at it and speaks in English, "You know where you can stick that!" and throws the axe away.

In the 2003 video game adaptation of The Hobbit Bifur tasks Bilbo several optional side-quests, but his voice actor is not specified in the credits. In The Lord of the Rings Online (2007) Bifur appears during the Siege of Erebor by the Easterlings in the final days of the War of the Ring. The game also introduces Bifur's son B贸si and grandson Bori, who become prominent characters during the Mines of Moria expansion, leading an expedition to reclaim Moria for the dwarves on the orders of D谩in Ironfoot.

Bofur[edit]

Bofur was one of the twelve companions of Thorin and Bilbo on the Quest of Erebor. Like other members of the company, his name comes directly from the Old Norse poem "V枚lusp谩", part of the Poetic Edda; see also wikt:B谦furr. The forefathers of all the Dwarves of Thorin's company came from Moria, but (unlike the rest of the company) Bofur, his younger brother Bombur and their cousin Bifur are not of the royal line of Durin,

Bofur sported a yellow hood, liked mince-pies and cheese at tea and like his cousin Bifur played the clarinet at the unexpected party in Bag End. He didn't have as rough a barrel-ride as most of his companions, but was still too stiff to help release the other dwarves following the escape from the Woodland Realm. Along with his brother Bombur he was nearly trapped at the bottom of a cliff on the Lonely Mountain after Smaug awoke before being rescued by the other dwarves.

As the result of the Quest, Bofur received a share of the fabulous hoard of Erebor, where he lived the rest of his days. He was alive and well many years after the Quest, as reported in The Fellowship of the Ring by Gl贸in to Frodo Baggins, on the eve of the Council of Elrond.

In film and other media[edit]

In The Hobbit film series by Peter Jackson Bofur is portrayed by Northern Irish actor James Nesbitt, whose daughters Mary and Peggy also portray Bard's daughters. Bofur's role is greatly expanded in the films, with him having multiple lines of dialogue and character scenes. Nesbitt described the character as being very protective over Bifur and Bombur, who have an injury and eating problem respectively. Since neither Bombur nor Bifur speak English throughout the three movies, Bofur also acts as a spokesman for all three of them, though in Nesbitt's words: "He can be deliberately very funny". In the extended version of The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey Bofur sings The Man in the Moon song while the company stays in Rivendell鈥攖he song was originally written by J. R. R. Tolkien and appeared in The Fellowship of the Ring, while Nesbitt wrote the music.[3] Bofur is also shown to be very fond of Bilbo because he understands the Hobbit's initial unwillingness to leave behind the safety and comfort of his home; key scenes for this include Bilbo's attempted retreat during their journey through the Misty Mountains in the first part, the aftermath of their fight with the giant spiders in Mirkwood in the second part, and when Bilbo departs the Lonely Mountain to deliver the Arkenstone to Gandalf, Bard and Thranduil in the third part. In a departure from the book, Bofur stays in Lake-Town with Oin, F铆li and K铆li while the rest of the company make the last leg of their journey towards Erebor, and he is the one to find a bundle of athelas which allows Tauriel to heal K铆li's poisoned wound in Desolation of Smaug. The four dwarves witness Smaug's destruction of Lake-Town and rejoin Thorin and the company shortly before the Battle of the Five Armies.

In the 2003 video game adaptation of The Hobbit Bofur tasks Bilbo with several optional side-quests, but his voice actor is not specified in the credits. In The Lord of the Rings Online (2007) Bofur appears during the Siege of Erebor by the Easterlings in the final days of the War of the Ring. The game also introduces Bofur's son Brogur and grandson Broin, who become prominent characters during the Mines of Moria expansion, leading an expedition to reclaim Moria for the dwarves on the orders of Dain Ironfoot.

Bombur[edit]

Bombur was one of the twelve companions of Thorin and Bilbo on the Quest of Erebor. His name comes from the Old Norse dwarf-name B枚mburr (which aptly means tubby) in the poem "V枚lusp谩", part of the Poetic Edda.[4] The forefathers of all the Dwarves of Thorin's company came from Moria, but (unlike the rest of the company) Bombur, his older brother Bofur and their cousin Bifur are not of the royal line of Durin.

He wears a pale green hood and displays a special passion for food; he played a drum during the unexpected party in Bag End.

Physique[edit]

Of the thirteen dwarves who embarked on the Quest of Erebor, Bombur is the one with the most distinctive physique. Described as "immensely fat and heavy", his weight was problematic at several points during the quest. Trusting neither mountain paths nor ropes to hold his weight, Bombur chose to stay and guard the company's camp while the others moved up to the hidden door to Erebor. Only Bofur stayed with him, and they were nearly trapped at the bottom of a cliff when Smaug awoke. The other dwarves were forced to use the ropes to lift them up swiftly just before the camp was destroyed by the rampaging dragon.

Despite his weight, Bombur could show strength and agility on occasions. He "fought like mad" against the Trolls, and he took a turn in carrying Bilbo when the Company was travelling at pace through the tunnels of Goblin-town.[5]

Many years later, in The Fellowship of the Ring, Gl贸in provided news of Bombur to Frodo Baggins on the eve of the Council of Elrond. Gl贸in reported that Bombur was still alive, but had grown so fat, it took six young dwarves to lift him, as he could no longer move from his bed.

Role[edit]

Bombur is frequently shown making mistakes and being the last in everything: he tumbled with Bifur and Bofur onto Thorin when they enter Bag End last, he entered Beorn's house last and yet earlier than intended, and he fell into the Enchanted River after complaining about always being last.

Having been immersed in the Enchanted River, Bombur fell into a deep enchanted sleep, and he subsequently was affected by sleep during several key moments later in the book. His first sleep lasted days, forcing his already despairing companions to carry his weight through Mirkwood. When he finally awoke, Bombur had no recollection of anything that happened to the company after the party in Bag End. He was also asleep when his barrel was opened at Esgaroth after the escape from the Woodland Realm, and when Bilbo discovered the secret entrance to Erebor. During the siege of Erebor, Bilbo used Bombur's sleepiness to advantage, promising to take Bombur's midnight watch and allow him to sleep, while escaping with the Arkenstone unnoticed.

In film and other media[edit]

In the 1977 Rankin/Bass version of The Hobbit, Bombur was voiced by Paul Frees; he is depicted as being stabbed by a goblin during the Battle of Five Armies and dies in Bilbo's arms. In the 2003 video game adaptation of The Hobbit Bombur is voiced by Daran Norris. Bombur is the only surviving member of Thorin's company not to appear in The Lord of the Rings Online; the only reference to him is the name of "Bombur's Beard Lager", a drink sold in a tavern in Ered Luin that is said to be his favourite in the years before the quest for Erebor.

In The Hobbit film series by Peter Jackson Bombur is portrayed by New Zealand actor Stephen Hunter. Bombur's interaction in all three movies is entirely non-verbal except the extended edition of the third movie; Jackson suggested to Hunter that Bombur could have more physical comedy moments at the expense of the lines and the actor embraced the idea.[6] As a result, Bombur is often seen with his mouth full when a response is expected. Originally armed with only a kitchen utensil, Bombur is shown cooking for the entire company. Despite his immense weight and size, Bombur is quite agile. During the chase in Goblin-Town he manages to keep running despite goblins hanging on top of him; and when startled by Beorn, he quickly outruns the entire company. Bombur's most iconic scene in the book (sinking into deep sleep after falling into the Enchanted River) is omitted from the theatrical release of The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug but restored in the extended edition. (Bombur speaks briefly during the battle in the extended edition of The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies.)

Dori[edit]

Dori was one of the twelve companions of Thorin and Bilbo on the Quest of Erebor. Like other members of the company, his name comes directly from the Old Norse poem "V枚lusp谩", part of the Poetic Edda; see also D贸ri. Along with Nori and Ori, he was of Durin's House, a distant relative of Thorin Oakenshield. Dori is described as "a decent fellow, despite his grumbling", while Thorin mentions him as being the strongest member of the company. Dori wore a purple hood when he arrived at Bag End and played the flute at the Unexpected Party. Dori was held responsible for the well-being of the burglar several times; he carried Bilbo in the goblin-tunnels of the Misty Mountains, but unfortunately dropped the burglar, for which the other dwarves later blamed him. During the escape from the Wargs, Dori climbed down from a tree to help Bilbo, who could not get up on his own. Later, Bilbo grabbed Dori's legs as the company was carried off by the Eagles, saving them from a fire lit by Goblins. When Gandalf was telling the story of the company's adventures to Beorn, Dori and Thorin were the first two Dwarves to show up.

As the result of the Quest, Dori received a share of the fabulous hoard of Erebor, where he lived the rest of his days. He was alive and well many years after the Quest, as reported in The Fellowship of the Ring by Gl贸in to Frodo Baggins, on the eve of the Council of Elrond.

In film and other media[edit]

Dori appeared in the 1977 adaptation of The Hobbit, voiced by John Stephenson.

In The Hobbit film series by Peter Jackson Dori is portrayed by New Zealand actor Mark Hadlow, who also played Bert the Troll in The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey. The movies establish Dori, Nori and Ori as half-siblings, sharing the same mother but three different fathers.[7] As the eldest of the three, Dori acts as the patriarch of the family and is very overprotective of the youngest, Ori, whom he had mothered all his life.[8] Dori holds a bit of resentment against Nori, who is a thieving character and not at all uptight, having spent most of the time apart from his family and only rejoining them shortly before the quest.[9] Dori has the best manner of all the dwarves, always addressing Gandalf politely as "Mister" even despite the danger. During the attack by Azog's warg-pack, Dori and Ori fall from the tree and are the first to be saved by the Eagles.

In the 2003 video game adaptation of The Hobbit, Dori tasks Bilbo with several optional side-quests, but his voice actor is not specified in the credits. Dori makes several appearances in The Lord of the Rings Online (2007): In the year TA 3016 Dori travels from Erebor to the Dwarf stronghold in the Ered Luin as part of Dwalin's company on the orders by D谩in II Ironfoot to reclaim those lands from the unsavory clan of Dourhand dwarves, corrupted by the influence of evil. Two years later, during the events of The Fellowship of the Ring, Dori is inspecting a Dwarf mining outpost in the North Downs, where he is captured by the Dourhands, forcing the player to rescue him, after which Dori joins Gildor Inglorion and Halbarad of the D煤nedain to form the Council of the North, focused on opposing the rising threat of Angmar. By the next year, TA 3019, Dori has made his way back to Erebor, where he participates in the siege during the final days of the War of the Ring.

Dwalin[edit]

Dwalin (T.A. 2772 鈥 Fourth Age 91/92) was one of the twelve companions of Thorin and Bilbo on the Quest of Erebor. He and his older brother, Balin, were the sons of Fundin, and thus of the royal line of Durin. Dwalin was born during the wanderings of his people, following the sack of Erebor. His father was killed in the Battle of Azanulbizar, and three years later (2802) Dwalin and his other surviving family settled in the Ered Mithrin (Blue Mountains), where he resided until the Quest of Erebor. In 2841, Dwalin was among those who set out with Thr谩in II,[10] but they lost Thr谩in and returned to the Blue Mountains.

A century later, Dwalin embarked on the Quest of Erebor, and he was the first Dwarf to arrive at Bag End. He wore a dark green hood and a golden belt, had a blue beard so long he had to tuck it into his belt, and like his brother Balin, he played the viol.

Dwalin lent a spare hood and cloak (also dark green) to Bilbo when they set out on their journey. Although the garments were "too large" for Bilbo, and at first made him feel embarrassingly "comic", he wore them throughout the Quest, and they became valued mementos of that adventure. Sixty years later, following his Farewell Party, Bilbo quit the Shire, wearing his old hood and cloak. He again journeyed east, and visited Erebor, where Dwalin was living.

After the Quest Dwalin lived the rest of his life in Erebor. There he was fabulously wealthy, a far cry from his early childhood. When he died in the year 91 of the Fourth Age he was aged 340, which is exceptionally old for a Dwarf (their average lifespan is around 250 years).

His name is taken from Dvalin, a dwarf from the Poetic Edda and other Norse mythology.

In film and other media[edit]

Dwalin appeared in the 1977 adaptation of The Hobbit, voiced by Jack DeLeon. He only has one line in the entire film.

Dwalin is portrayed by Graham McTavish in Peter Jackson's The Hobbit film adaptation.[11] He is the first dwarf to appear at Bilbo's home in the first film. He is more taciturn[12] compared to his brother, Balin.[13] Recognisable by his bald head, scalp tattoos and black beard, Dwalin is one of Thorin's fiercest warriors. In flashback, he is seen during the War of the Dwarves and Orcs fighting against Azog's Orcs at Moria, and after rallying their kin against the Orcs at the end of the third film, he is one of only three dwarves, along with K铆li and F铆li, who join Thorin to pursue Azog. He wields a war hammer and a pair of hand axes, which are named Grasper and Keeper.

F铆li[edit]

F铆li (T.A. 2859 鈥 2941) was one of the twelve companions of Thorin and Bilbo on the Quest of Erebor. He and his brother K铆li were nephews of Thorin, sons of Thorin's sister D铆s. The two brothers were born in the Ered Luin (Blue Mountains), and lived there until the Quest. They are described as being younger than the other dwarves of Thorin's company by some fifty years.

F铆li and his brother are often presented as a pair, and (in the book) can be difficult to distinguish, as they have similar appearance and traits. Both had a blue cloak, silver belt and yellow beard. Both played the fiddle. They also had the best eyesight and so were often sent scouting or searching. The brothers are consistently described as cheerful, the only two to have come out of the barrels at Lake-town "more or less smiling."

Both brothers fell at the Battle of Five Armies, defending their uncle Thorin, and were buried with honour.

Although Chapter 8 of The Hobbit describes F铆li as the youngest, in Appendix A of The Lord of the Rings his birth year is given as T.A. 2859, whereas K铆li's is 2864.

F铆li's name was taken from the Old Norse F铆li, where it means 'the Filer', referring to the tool. Notably when F铆li is introduced in The Hobbit, he is carrying a bag of tools.

In film and other media[edit]

F铆li is portrayed by Dean O'Gorman in Peter Jackson's The Hobbit film adaptation. Rob Kazinsky was originally cast in the role but dropped out citing personal issues. In the film, he is the older brother. In the film The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug Thorin says to F铆li, "One day you will be King, and you will understand", an indication that F铆li is older than K铆li. In The Battle of the Five Armies, F铆li and K铆li join Thorin and Dwalin in a commando operation to kill Azog. Separated from his brother, F铆li is captured by Azog and helplessly killed before the eyes of his shocked kinsmen and Bilbo, driving K铆li into a berserk rage.

Gl贸in, son of Gr贸in[edit]

Gl贸in (T.A. 2783 鈥 Fourth Age 15), son of Gr贸in, was one of the twelve companions of Thorin and Bilbo Baggins on the Quest of Erebor, as was his older brother 脫in. The two brothers were direct descendants of Durin the Deathless. Many years after the Quest, Gl贸in and his son Gimli were sent to Rivendell as an embassy from King D谩in II to bring news of Erebor, Moria, and what they knew of Sauron's plans; they arrived in time to attend the Council of Elrond.[14] He wears a white hood. The name Gloin is found in the V枚lusp谩.

He was born during the wanderings of the Dwarves following the sack of Erebor. In T.A. 2790, the year he turned 7, his family had been living for a time in Dunland.[15] In T.A. 2802[16] he settled with his family in the Ered Luin, where he dwelt until the Quest; his son Gimli was born there.

As the result of the Quest, Gl贸in received a share of the fabulous hoard of Erebor, and he lived in the restored kingdom virtually the rest of his life.

In film and other media[edit]

Gl贸in was a playable hero in the Dwarven Faction in the Electronic Arts Real-Time Strategy game The Lord of the Rings: The Battle for Middle-earth II, and specialized in attacks that would either destroy or disable the opponents' buildings.

He is portrayed by Peter Hambleton in Peter Jackson's The Hobbit film trilogy. In The Desolation of Smaug, Gl贸in is shown to be something of a miser who withholds his personal stash of money from the Company's payment to Bard until he first beholds the Lonely Mountain, whereupon he surrenders it all.

Peter Hambleton also portrayed an older version of the character in Peter Jackson's The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring during the meeting in Rivendell.

K铆li[edit]

K铆li (T.A. 2864 鈥 2941) was one of the twelve companions of Thorin and Bilbo on the Quest of Erebor. He and his brother F铆li were the sons of D铆s, Thorin's sister; they were born in the Ered Luin (Blue Mountains) and resided there until the Quest. The two brothers were described as being young in Dwarf terms, younger than the rest by some fifty years.

K铆li and his brother are often presented as a pair, and (in the book) can be difficult to distinguish, as they have similar appearance and traits. Both had a blue cloak, silver belt and yellow beard. Both played the fiddle. They also had the best eyesight and so were often sent scouting or searching. The brothers are consistently described as cheerful, the only two to have come out of the barrels at Lake-town "more or less smiling."

Both brothers fell at the Battle of Five Armies, defending their uncle Thorin, and were buried with honour.

Although F铆li is described as being the younger in Chapter 8 of The Hobbit, in Appendix A of The Lord of the Rings his birth year is given as T.A. 2859, whereas K铆li's is 2864.

K铆li's name was taken from the Old Norse K铆li, where it means 'the Wedge', referring to the tool. Notably when K铆li is introduced in The Hobbit, he is carrying a bag of tools.

In film and other media[edit]

In Peter Jackson's film adaptation of The Hobbit, K铆li is portrayed by Aidan Turner. He is the archer of Thorin's company, and is the only Dwarf in the film to not have a full-grown beard, only stubble. In this portrayal, despite their vastly differing backgrounds, he and the elven warrior Tauriel begin to form a bond, as they recognize each other as kindred spirits. During the Battle of Five Armies, he joins Thorin's commando team to take down Azog on Ravenhill, and when Tauriel arrives to aid him, she is confronted and almost killed by Azog's son Bolg. K铆li leaps to her defence, causing Bolg to kill him instead. Tauriel is left mourning her loss, showing that her love for the dwarf was genuine.

Nori[edit]

Nori was one of the twelve companions of Thorin and Bilbo on the Quest of Erebor. He was of Durin's House, a distant relative of Thorin Oakenshield. He wears a purple hood, like Dori. Nori, Dori and Ori form a sub-group in the company. All three played the flute.

As the result of the Quest, Nori received a share of the fabulous hoard of Erebor, where he lived the rest of his days. He was alive and well many years after the Quest, as reported in The Fellowship of the Ring by Gl贸in to Frodo Baggins, on the eve of the Council of Elrond.

Nori's name was taken from Norse mythology; see also wikt:N贸ri.

In film and other media[edit]

He is portrayed by Jed Brophy in Peter Jackson's The Hobbit film adaptation. He sports a distinct triple mohawk hairstyle and fights with a long spiked staff, along with numerous concealed weapons. He is also a longtime thief who shares a strained relationship with his two brothers.

脫in, son of Gr贸in[edit]

脫in (T.A. 2774 鈥 2994), elder son of Gr贸in, was one of the twelve companions of Thorin and Bilbo on the Quest of Erebor. He and his younger brother Gl贸in were both born during the wanderings of their people, which followed the sack of Erebor. In 2802 they and their family settled in the Ered Luin (Blue Mountains). Nearly forty years later the two brothers joined the Quest of Erebor; they were counted on to start the campfires, though the brothers bickered over the task. 脫in wears a brown hood.

As the result of the Quest, he received a share of the fabulous hoard of Erebor. He lived in Erebor for forty-seven years, until he joined Balin's expedition to recolonize Moria. There, as recorded in the Book of Mazarbul, he was killed by the Watcher in the Water while trying to escape via Moria's Western Door.

In film and other media[edit]

In Peter Jackson's movie The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey, 脫in is played by John Callen.[17] He wields a staff and uses an ear trumpet.[citation needed] In addition to his skill at lighting fires, 脫in is the group's healer.[18]

Ori[edit]

Ori was one of the twelve companions of Thorin and Bilbo on the Quest of Erebor. He was of Durin's House, a distant relative of Thorin Oakenshield. Ori, Dori and Nori form a sub-group within the company. All three played the flute. Ori wears a grey hood, and loves the arts.

He was also one of the Dwarves who, many years after the Quest, entered Moria with Balin. He was among the last members of Balin's colony to be killed (T.A. 2994), as is known by his entering the last records in the Book of Mazarbul before their final hopeless stand against the Orcs. This book was later discovered by the Fellowship of the Ring.

Ori's penmanship in the Book of Mazarbul suggests he was probably the scribe of Thorin & Co.'s letter at the start of the Quest of Erebor.

Ori's name was taken from Norse mythology; see also wikt:脫ri.

In film and other media[edit]

He is portrayed by Adam Brown in Peter Jackson's The Hobbit film adaptation. In this adaptation, Ori uses a slingshot as his trademark weapon and serves as the group's scribe. Ori has a chinstrap beard and bowl cut[citation needed] and a cable knit scarf.[19]

In the Hobbit film trilogy, it is Ori instead of F铆li that is the youngest of Thorin Oakenshield's company.[citation needed]

Balin's Colony[edit]

Many years after re-establishment of the kingdom of Erebor, some of its Dwarves turned their thoughts to Moria. In T.A. 2989 Balin led an expedition to recolonize Moria, in defiance of King D谩in's wishes. Among those who followed him included 脫in and Ori (who like Balin had been members of Thorin's company), and Fl贸i, Fr谩r, L贸ni, and N谩li. At first all went well, but after five years the colony was destroyed by Orcs, and all its Dwarves were killed.

Balin was Lord of Moria from T.A. 2989 to 2994. Thirty-four years later, his tomb and the Book of Mazarbul that told of his expedition and death were discovered by the Fellowship of the Ring.

The Fellowship[edit]

Two Dwarves attended the Council of Elrond, and were present at the founding of the Fellowship of the Ring. They were Gl贸in, son of Gr贸in, and his son Gimli. Of those, only Gimli became a member of the Fellowship.

Broadbeams and Firebeards[edit]

The Firebeards and the Broadbeams awoke in Mount Dolmed in the Blue Mountains, and lived there throughout the history of their people.[20] They eventually founded either the cities of Nogrod, Belegost, or both, in the Blue Mountains.[21]

The ancient cities of Nogrod and Belegost were ruined in the breaking of Thangorodrim at the end of the First Age. Many of their inhabitants travelled east as refugees to the great Dwarvish city of Khazad-d没m, increasing its power and wealth, and enriching it with many people and much lore and craft.[22]

Azagh芒l[edit]

Azagh芒l was the Lord of the Dwarves of Belegost during the First Age. He was slain by the dragon Glaurung after wounding him in the Battle of Unnumbered Tears. The helmet later known as the Helm of Hador was originally made for Azagh芒l by Telchar, the master craftsman of the neighbouring Dwarf-realm of Nogrod.[23] Azagh芒l gave the helmet to Maedhros in gratitude for saving his life.

Gamil Zirak[edit]

Gamil Zirak was a Dwarvish smith of Nogrod in the First Age. He was a great craftsman, and master of Telchar of Nogrod. Gamil's work was found in the treasuries of Thingol.[24]

The element Zirak also appears in the Dwarvish mountain-name Zirakzigil (Silvertine). Tolkien prevaricated as to whether zirak in Zirakzigil meant silver or tine (spike),[25] but both could be applicable to Gamil, a smith.

Telchar[edit]

Telchar was a Dwarf of Nogrod in the Blue Mountains in the First Age. Taught by Gamil Zirak, he was one of the greatest smiths of Middle-earth. Among his works were Angrist,[26] Narsil,[27] and the Dragon-Helm of Dor-l贸min.[28]

Burned Dwarves[edit]

Dwarves from all seven clans participated in the War of the Dwarves and Orcs (T.A. 2793-2799). The Dwarves finally won in the Battle of Azanulbizar, but at great cost. Dwarves normally gave honour to their dead by burial in stone tombs, but in this case the fatalities were cremated in many pyres, after being stripped of their weapons and armour. A Dwarf cremated on this occasion was called a "burned Dwarf", and regarded with high honour.[29]

Three burned Dwarves are known by name: Frerin, Fundin, and N谩in (son of Gr贸r), all members of the royal line of Durin.

Durin's Folk[edit]

Durin's emblem as inscribed on the Doors of Durin

Durin's Folk, also known as the Longbeards, were the most important clan of Dwarves in Middle-earth. Their name comes from that of their first king, Durin I "the Deathless". They were the eldest and greatest of the seven dwarf-clans.

They originally inhabited the Misty Mountains as a home, until they were driven out by Orcs. Their strongholds in the Misty Mountains included Khazad-d没m (Moria), their first city, and Mount Gundabad. During the Second Age, Durin's folk entered into friendship with the Noldor of Celebrimbor in Eregion. During the War of the Last Alliance, Durin's folk allied with the Elves and the D煤nedain.

In the Third Age, after being driven out of Moria by the Balrog Durin's Bane, most of Durin's Folk fled north and established cities in Erebor and the Ered Mithrin. Both the Ered Mithrin and Erebor were later occupied by Dragons, and they then became a wandering folk in exile. Most of them settled in the Iron Hills, while others under Thr谩in II wandered west, till they came to the Ered Luin and settled there. Finally, the Dwarf-kingdom of Erebor was restored when D谩in II, Lord of the Iron Hills, became King of Erebor in T.A. 2941 following the Battle of Five Armies.

Durin I was succeeded by many generations of kings, among whom[30] appeared six others also named Durin. These six were believed by the dwarves to be reincarnations (or even reanimations) of Durin I, with memories of his earlier lives.[31] Durin VI was killed by Durin's Bane in 1980 of the Third Age. Durin did not again return to his people until Durin VII appeared in the Fourth Age, a descendant of Thorin III son of D谩in II Ironfoot, and a descendant in direct line from Durin the Deathless. Durin VII would become known as Durin the Last.

Durin's family tree[edit]


Succession of kings of Durin's folk[edit]

Durin, and his reincarnations[edit]

Durin the Deathless eventually died, and was succeeded through thousands of years by a long line of Kings of Khazad-d没m, father to son. Some of these kings were named Durin: Dwarves believed them to be reincarnations of Durin the Deathless.
  • Durin II (circa S.A. 750) was King of the Dwarves of Khazad-d没m. The name of Durin inscribed on the eponymous Doors of Durin (the West-gate of Moria) may refer to Durin II[32] or Durin III.[33]
  • Durin III (fl. S.A. 1500) was King of Khazad-d没m during the making of the Rings of Power, and was the first bearer of one of the Seven Rings, although this was not known to outsiders until the end of the Third Age. In S.A. 1697 Celebrimbor, the lord of Eregion and a great friend of Khazad-d没m, was killed in the War of the Elves and Sauron, both Durin and Elrond sent armies into the conflict.[34] Although Eregion was destroyed, Elrond and many Elves escaped. Durin withdrew his people into Khazad-d没m and shut the gates. They remained closed for many years.
  • Durin IV was King of the Dwarves of Khazad-d没m.
  • Durin V was King of the Dwarves of Khazad-d没m.
  • Durin VI (T.A. 1793 鈥 1980) was King of the Dwarves of Khazad-d没m when the Balrog was aroused deep beneath the city and killed Durin.
  • Durin VII (fl. Fourth Age or later) was a descendant of Thorin III Stonehelm of Durin's folk, who was King of the Dwarves of Erebor and lord of the Iron Hills.

N谩in I[edit]

N谩in I (T.A. 1832 鈥 1981) was briefly the King of Durin's folk and King of Khazad-d没m. In 1980 his father, Durin VI, was slain by the Balrog; N谩in succeeded as King, but the Balrog, now named Durin's Bane, remained a threat. N谩in attempted to continue the kingdom, but the following year he was also killed by the Balrog. The remainder of Durin's Folk fled Khazad-d没m, and the city was renamed Moria. N谩in was succeeded as king by his son Thr谩in I.

Thr谩in I[edit]

Thr谩in I (T.A. 1934 鈥 2190), sometimes called Thr谩in the Old, was a King of Durin's folk: the last King of Khazad-d没m (although his effective reign there was brief), and the first King under the Mountain.

He was born in Khazad-d没m, the son of N谩in I. In T.A. 1980 his grandfather Durin VI was slain by the Balrog. The following year his father was also slain by the Balrog, and Thr谩in, now the King, fled Khazad-d没m together with the remainder of Durin's folk. They wandered across Wilderland, eventually settling in Erebor, which Thr谩in founded in T.A. 1999. Thr谩in's new realm prospered, he found the Arkenstone, and his son Thorin I and grandson were born during his long reign. On his death he was succeeded by Thorin.

Development of the character[edit]

Tolkien developed the character 'Thrain' to resolve an inconsistency between the text of The Hobbit and the map published with it. When creating the first typescript copy of The Hobbit, he added one line which referred to Thorin's father as Thror and his grandfather as Thrain, the reverse of the published names, probably inadvertently.[35] Remarkably, he then changed all other references in the text to use this reversed genealogy, and then later changed them all back again.[36] In the confusion, the map that he produced for The Hobbit contained text naming Thrain as "King under the Mountain", but Thorin's grandfather was the last King under the Mountain. This discrepancy was noticed by readers, so in the second (1951) edition of The Hobbit, Tolkien added a prefatory note, explaining that the Thrain referred to on the map was not Thorin's father or grandfather, but a distant ancestor, Thrain I.

Thorin I[edit]

Thorin I (T.A. 2035 鈥 2289) was a King of Durin's folk, and a King under the Mountain. He was born in Erebor, the son of King Thr谩in I; there also his son Gl贸in was born; and there too he succeeded his father, in T.A. 2190.

However in T.A. 2210 Thorin and the greater part of his folk left Erebor, the Kingdom under the Mountain, and founded a new realm in the Ered Mithrin (Grey Mountains). There he saw the birth of his grandson. After leaving Erebor he had remained King of Durin's folk; upon his death his son, Gl贸in, succeeded to this kingship and the realm of Ered Mithrin.

Gl贸in, son of Thorin[edit]

Gl贸in (T.A. 2136 鈥 2385) was a King of Durin's folk. He was born in Erebor the son of Thorin I. In 2190 his father became King. Shortly thereafter they moved to the Ered Mithrin (Grey Mountains), where he remained the rest of his life. In 2289 he succeeded his father as the King. He expanded the mines of the Ered Mithrin, and further abandoned Erebor. His son 脫in was born in the Grey Mountains, and his grandson was born there during his reign. On his death he was succeeded by 脫in.

脫in, son of Gl贸in[edit]

脫in (T.A. 2238 鈥 2488), son of Gl贸in, was a King of Durin's folk. He succeeded his father as King in 2385. He spent his whole life in the Ered Mithrin (Grey Mountains): there he was born, ruled and died; there his son (N谩in II) was born, and he lived to see the birth of his grandsons. He was succeeded by N谩in II.

N谩in II[edit]

N谩in II (T.A. 2338 鈥 2585) was a King of Durin's Folk, son of 脫in. He spent his whole life in the Ered Mithrin (Grey Mountains), succeeding his father as King there in 2488. Under N谩in's kingship, the Dwarves lived peacefully in the Grey Mountains until they were attacked by dragons. N谩in was born in the Grey Mountains, as were his sons and grandsons, whom he lived to see. He was succeeded by his elder son, D谩in I. Several of the companions of Thorin Oakenshield were descended Nain's younger son Borin, as was Gimli.

D谩in I[edit]

D谩in I (T.A. 2440 鈥 2589), the son of N谩in II, was the last King of Durin's Folk united. D谩in and his younger brother Borin were born in their grandfather's realm in the Ered Mithrin (Grey Mountains), where D谩in spent his whole life. He succeeded his father as King there in 2585. Attacks by dragons on their mines in the Ered Mithrin continued, and after a reign of only four years he was killed by a cold-drake from the far north in T.A. 2589, together with his son Fr贸r. He was succeeded by his two surviving sons: Thr贸r, who refounded the kingdom of Erebor, and Gr贸r, who became the lord of the Iron Hills. Durin's Folk were eventually reunited in 2941 on the accession of D谩in's great-grandson and namesake, D谩in Ironfoot.

Thr贸r[edit]

Thr贸r (T.A. 2542 鈥 2790) was a King of Durin's folk. His life was a mixture of great success and devastating tragedies.

He was born in the Ered Mithrin (Grey Mountains), the eldest son of D谩in I; his brothers Fr贸r and Gr贸r were also born there. He succeeded to the kingship when a cold-drake killed his father in T.A. 2589; his brother Fr贸r was also killed by the dragon.

The following year Thr贸r and most of his people left the Grey Mountains; many followed Thr贸r to Erebor, which he re-occupied as King under the Mountain, but many of his people followed his brother Gr贸r to settle instead in the Iron Hills farther east.

Thr贸r's son, Thr谩in II, and grandchildren were born in his reign in Erebor. There his people greatly prospered, but their success attracted the attention of another dragon, Smaug, who in 2770 attacked and occupied the mountain, killing many of Thr贸r's people. The surviving Dwarves had to flee.

Thr贸r and his people then wandered abroad, becoming increasingly poor and desperate. In 2790, when they were living for a time in Dunland, Thr贸r committed the heirlooms of his house to his son (Thr谩in II), and with his companion N谩r sought to re-enter Moria. He was captured there by Azog the Orc, who tortured him and chopped off his head. His body was thrown out the East Gate, hacked to pieces and fed to crows in full view of N谩r. This started the War of the Dwarves and Orcs.

The heirlooms which Thr贸r handed on to Thr谩in included a Ring of Power, and items relating to a secret entrance to Erebor: a map (later called Thror's Map) and a key.

Tolkien derived the name Thr贸r from the Old Norse dwarf-name 脼r贸r, which means thrive, an allusion to Thr贸r's prosperity.[37]

Thr贸r is portrayed by Jeffrey Thomas in Peter Jackson's film version of The Hobbit but he does not speak in it. In this version Azog beheads him at the Battle of Azanulbizar.

Thr谩in II[edit]

Thr谩in II (T.A. 2644 鈥 2850) was the father of Thorin Oakenshield and the son of Thr贸r. In revenge for his father's death he started the War of the Dwarves and Orcs. Later he went wandering, and was captured by the Necromancer in Dol Guldur at which time the last of the three surviving Seven Rings of Power was taken from him.

He is portrayed by Mike Mizrahi in Peter Jackson's The Hobbit film adaptation.

Thorin II Oakenshield[edit]

Thorin II Oakenshield (T.A. 2746 鈥 2941) was the King of Durin's Folk who led the expedition to destroy Smaug in T.A. 2941 and was slain in the Battle of Five Armies.

In Peter Jackson's The Hobbit film trilogy, Thorin is portrayed by Richard Armitage.

D谩in II Ironfoot[edit]

D谩in II Ironfoot (T.A. 2767 鈥 3019) was lord of the Dwarves of the Iron Hills. He was the son of N谩in and grandson of Gr贸r, the youngest son of D谩in I. D谩in's father N谩in was killed by the great Orc Azog during the Battle of Nanduhirion before the gates of Moria, the culmination of the War of the Dwarves and Orcs. D谩in avenged N谩in, slaying Azog in single combat. He was a very young Dwarf at the time (only 32, roughly when Dwarves reach maturity, or "battle-readiness"),[38] and this was heralded as a magnificent feat. D谩in alone looked past the gate into Moria, and knew that it was impossible for the Dwarves to return at that time, because Durin's Bane still resided in those halls. He dissuaded Thr谩in II from attempting to occupy Moria.[39]

D谩in was second cousin to Thorin Oakenshield, and responded to Thorin's call for help during the quest to reclaim Erebor. D谩in set out with several hundred Dwarves, and arrived just in time for the Battle of Five Armies. Thorin was killed in this battle, D谩in succeeded Thorin as King under the Mountain and King of Durin's folk, the first not in the direct line of Durin. D谩in was killed during the War of the Ring in T.A. 3019, defending the body of his ally King Brand of Dale before the gates of Erebor. He was by then an old Dwarf 鈥 aged 252 according to Appendix A in The Lord of the Rings 鈥 but his prowess in battle was still great. After the war he was succeeded by his son, Thorin III Stonehelm.[39]

D谩in appears as a hero for the dwarven faction in the real-time strategy game The Lord of the Rings: The Battle for Middle-earth II (2006). In the story campaign King Brand is absent and D谩in survives the siege of Erebor. He leads his dwarves against the orcs invading the Lake-Town and later joins forces with the Elves during the siege of Dol Guldur. In The Lord of the Rings Online (2007) the circumstances of D谩in's death are different: instead of the end of the siege of Erebor, he dies at its beginning, buying the time for King Brand and his men to escape inside the mountain. In the Games Workshop Lord of the Rings Table Top game D谩in's axe is given the name Barazantathul, and is described as "one of the finest weapons ever made by Dwarfdom". This name does not appear in Tolkien's works.In The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies (2014) he is portrayed by Scottish comedian Billy Connolly.[40] In the film, D谩in rides a large boar into battle and has boar tusks embedded in his beard. The extended edition of the film shows D谩in's coronation as the King Under the Mountain. Connolly's portrayal of Dain was originally to be live-acted, but according to Greg Tozer, one of the designers for Weta Workshop, Peter Jackson, Fran Walsh and Philippa Boyens felt that Billy Connolly had become somewhat lost under the extensive makeup, costume and prosthetics. Therefore, Dain was portrayed digitally by Connolly using techniques such as motion capture, so that his facial features, body language, and expressions could be read more clearly.[41]

Thorin III Stonehelm[edit]

Thorin III Stonehelm (T.A. 2866 鈥 Fourth Age) was born the son and heir of D谩in II Ironfoot, the lord of the Iron Hills. In 2941 D谩in succeeded as King under the Mountain and King of Durin's Folk. Thorin himself succeeded to the kingships when his father was killed during the War of the Ring in T.A. 3019. Thorin III helped rebuild Erebor and Dale, and prospered. His realm became a close ally of the Reunited Kingdom of King Elessar.

During his rule, Gimli led a number of Dwarves south to Aglarond, where a new lordship was established, most likely a colony of Durin's Folk under the vassalage of the King of Erebor. Thorin III had a descendant, Durin VII the Last, who was held to be the final reincarnation of Durin the Deathless.

Gimli[edit]

Gimli (T.A. 2879 鈭 Fourth Age), the son of Gl贸in, of the royal line of Durin. He was chosen by Elrond to be one of the nine members of the Fellowship of the Ring. He remained with Aragorn and Legolas throughout the War of the Ring, fighting in the battles of the Hornburg, Pelargir, and Pelennor Fields. His friendship with Legolas and love for Galadriel earned him the title of Elf-friend. He was played by John Rhys-Davies in Peter Jackson's film series The Lord of the Rings.

Other dwarves of Durin's Line[edit]

The royal family of the Longbeards included its kings; Thorin Oakenshield and many of his Company (namely Balin & Dwalin, F铆li & K铆li, 脫in & Gl贸in, and Ori, Nori & Dori); and Gimli of the Fellowship of the Ring; all listed above. The following are miscellaneous members of the royal family.

Borin[edit]

Borin (T.A. 2450 鈭 2711) was a Dwarf of Durin's Line, the younger son of King N谩in II. He was born in the Ered Mithrin (Grey Mountains), as was his son Farin. After his brother King D谩in I was killed, Borin and his son moved to Erebor when it was refounded in 2590, and there he lived the rest of his life. He lived to see the births of his grandsons, and was the ancestor of both Balin of Thorin's Company and Gimli of the Fellowship of the Ring.

D铆s[edit]

D铆s (born T.A. 2760) was a female Dwarf, daughter and youngest child of Thr谩in II. She and her siblings were born in Erebor while their grandfather Thr贸r was King under the Mountain. They escaped the sack of Erebor and went into wandering. Eventually she and her surviving family settled in the Ered Luin (Blue Mountains), where she became the mother of F铆li and K铆li. In 2941 both her sons joined her brother Thorin Oakenshield on the quest to regain Erebor. D铆s was the only female dwarf ever named in the annals.

Farin[edit]

Farin (T.A. 2560 鈭 2803) was the son of Borin. He was born in the Ered Mithrin (Grey Mountains), during the reign of his grandfather King N谩in II. After his uncle King D谩in I was killed in 2589, the Dwarves left the Grey Mountains, and Farin followed his cousin Thr贸r to refound the kingdom of Erebor. There his sons Fundin and Gr贸in were born, and his oldest grandson Balin. They all left Erebor when it was sacked by Smaug, and went into wandering. His elder son Fundin was killed in the Battle of Azanulbizar; three years later Farin and his surviving family settled in the Ered Luin (Blue Mountains), where he lived the last year of his life.

Frerin[edit]

Frerin (T.A. 2751 鈭 2799) was the second of the three children of Thr谩in II: he had an older brother, Thorin Oakenshield, and a younger sister, D铆s. All three were born in Erebor while their grandfather Thr贸r was King under the Mountain. When Erebor was sacked they survived, and went with their people into wandering. However Frerin perished when he was still young by Dwarf standards: he joined in the Battle of Azanulbizar, the climactic battle of the War of the Dwarves and Orcs, and was killed beneath the East-gate of Moria. Frerin was revered in memory as a Burned Dwarf.

Fr贸r[edit]

Fr贸r (T.A. 2552 鈭 2589) was a Dwarf of the line of Durin. He was born in the Grey Mountains, where his father, D谩in I, succeeded as king in T.A. 2585. Fr贸r and his father were killed there by a cold-drake. The kingship of Durin's folk then passed to Fr贸r's elder brother Thr贸r, who refounded the kingdom of Erebor. However, the greater part of Durin's folk followed Fr贸r's younger brother Gr贸r to the Iron Hills.

Fundin[edit]

Fundin (T.A. 2662 鈭 2799) was a Dwarf of the royal line of Durin. He was the son of Farin, and the elder brother of Gr贸in. The brothers were born in Erebor when Thr贸r (their father's cousin) was King under the Mountain. Fundin survived the sack of Erebor together with his seven-year-old son Balin, and they went wandering with their people. His younger son Dwalin was born during this time.

Fundin fought in the War of the Dwarves and Orcs, which began in 2793. He was killed beneath the East Gate of Moria in the climactic Battle of Azanulbizar. In the aftermath of the battle, all the bodies of those who fell were stripped of their armour and weaponry by their kinsmen, and were cremated upon pyres of wood, Fundin among them. He was thus revered in memory as a Burned Dwarf.

Years later his sons Balin and Dwalin joined Thorin Oakenshield on the quest to regain Erebor.

Gr贸in[edit]

Gr贸in (T.A. 2671 鈭 2923) was a Dwarf of the royal line of Durin. He and his elder brother Fundin were the sons of Farin, and were born in Erebor during the reign of King Thr贸r, their father's cousin. In 2770 Gr贸in and his family escaped the sack of Erebor and wandered Middle-earth. During that time his sons 脫in and Gl贸in were born. From 2793 to 2799 he participated in the War of the Dwarves and Orcs; his brother Fundin was killed in the final battle. In 2802 Gr贸in and his family settled in the Ered Luin (Blue Mountains), where he dwelt the rest of his days. He lived to see the birth (T.A. 2879) and youth of his grandson Gimli.

Gr贸r[edit]

Gr贸r (T.A. 2563 鈭 2805) was born in the Ered Mithrin (Grey Mountains), the youngest son of King D谩in I. After his father and brother Fr贸r were killed by a dragon in 2589, the Dwarves left the Grey Mountains. His eldest brother Thr贸r went to refound the kingdom of Erebor, but the majority of Durin's folk followed Gr贸r to the Iron Hills. There he ruled as an autonomous lord for the rest of his life, under the nominal kingship of the Kings of Durin's folk. His son N谩in and his grandson D谩in Ironfoot were born during his lordship. N谩in was killed in the Battle of Azanulbizar (T.A. 2799), so Dain succeeded to the lordship on Gr贸r's death.

N谩in, son of Gr贸r[edit]

N谩in (T.A. 2665 鈭 2799), son of Gr贸r, was heir to the Dwarf-lordship of the Iron Hills and a descendant of the royal line of Durin. He was killed at the Battle of Azanulbizar when Azog, the Orc-lord of Moria, broke Nain's neck at the East-gate of Moria. N谩in's young son, D谩in Ironfoot, avenged his father's death by killing Azog in turn.

N谩in died before his own father, so he never succeeded to the lordship of the Iron Hills. Upon N谩in's death his son D谩in became heir. (D谩in later succeeded to the lordship, and eventually succeeded to the kingship of Erebor.)

N谩in was among those revered in memory as a Burned Dwarf.

Other dwarves of Durin's folk[edit]

This section comprises those of Durin's folk who are not recorded as being members of the royal family. There were also three famous Longbeards who were explicitly not of the royal line: Bifur, Bofur and Bombur of Thorin's Company.

Fl贸i[edit]

Fl贸i was one of the Dwarves who joined Balin in his attempt to recolonize Moria. In the first year of the colony, T.A. 2989, the Dwarves were fighting Orcs in the Dimrill Dale, and Fl贸i slew one of their champions. But he was killed in the battle by an orc-arrow, one of the first of Balin's followers to be killed. He was buried in the Dale under the grass at Mirrormere. His valour and death were recorded in the Book of Mazarbul.

In Games Workshop's middle earth table top game a dwarven loremaster named Fl贸i Stonehand can be included in a Moria army, presumably based off the Fl贸i that joined Balin's expedition.

Fr谩r[edit]

Fr谩r was one of the Dwarves who entered Moria with Balin. His death in 2994, while defending the Durin's Bridge|Bridge of Khazad-d没m, was recorded in the Book of Mazarbul.

L贸ni[edit]

L贸ni was one of the Dwarves who entered Moria with Balin. His death there in T.A. 2994 was recorded in the Book of Mazarbul.

N谩li[edit]

N谩li was one of the Dwarves who entered Moria with Balin. His death there in T.A. 2994 was the last recorded in the Book of Mazarbul.

N谩r[edit]

N谩r was the companion of Thr贸r during his ill-fated attempt to reclaim Moria. After Thr贸r was killed by Orcs (T.A. 2790), N谩r bore the ill tidings to Thr贸r's son Thr谩in II. This sparked the War of the Dwarves and Orcs, which involved N谩r and all other Dwarves.

Tolkien derived the name N谩r from the Old Norse dwarf-name N谩r, which means corpse.[42] Thus the Dwarf's name alludes to his gruesome news.

Narvi[edit]

Narvi was a great craftsman of the Dwarf-realm of Khazad-d没m who built its West-gate in the Second Age. The gate was built under the authority of his king, Durin, whose name was inscribed over the doors. This is most likely to have been Durin II.

The gateway was co-built with the neighbouring Elf-realm of Eregion, founded circa S.A. 750. Celebrimbor, the lord of Eregion, and a great friend of Narvi,[43] made the inscriptions on the doors, writing in Sindarin. His inscription is partly on behalf of Narvi: Im Narvi hain echant: Celebrimbor o Eregion teithant i thiw hin ("I, Narvi, made them [the Doors]: Celebrimbor of Eregion drew these signs").

The Fellowship of the Ring arrived at Narvi's Doors thousands of years later (13th 'January' T.A. 3019). By this time, Narvi's "craft and all his kindred have vanished" from Middle-earth.[44] The Doors were rendered impassable shortly after the Fellowship used them.

Tolkien knew the name Narvi from his studies of the Prose Edda.

Dwarves of Rh没n[edit]

Dwarves emerged in Middle-earth during the Years of the Trees: after Elves but before Men. When the Seven Fathers of the Dwarves awoke in far-flung corners of Middle-earth, some of them found themselves in Rh没n, and there they founded kingdoms under mountains.

These four clans are the Ironfists, Stiffbeards, Blacklocks, and the Stonefoots.[45]

In the Third Age, Dwarves of those kingdoms journeyed out of Rh没n to join all Middle-earth's other Dwarf clans in the War of the Dwarves and Orcs, which was fought in and under the Misty Mountains. After this war, the survivors returned home.

Late in the Third Age, when war and terror grew in Rh没n itself, considerable numbers of its Dwarves left their ancient homelands. They sought refuge in Middle-earth's western lands, where some of them met Frodo Baggins.[46]

Petty-dwarves[edit]

The Petty-dwarves only existed in the First Age.

M卯m[edit]

M卯m was one of the last of the Petty-dwarves. He lived together with his two sons, Ib没n and Kh卯m, at Amon R没dh in west Beleriand, where he kept a secret treasury. Although he harboured the company of T煤rin, he also betrayed them to Orcs, as a man of T煤rin's company had slain his son Kh卯m. M卯m was eventually slain by H煤rin (T煤rin's father) at Nargothrond.

During T煤rin's time with the Outlaws, M卯m and sons were seen as they snuck past the outlaws carrying heavy sacks. M卯m was captured, and arrows were shot at his sons Ib没n and Kh卯m.

In exchange for his life, M卯m was forced to lead the outlaws to his secret halls in Amon R没dh. There, it turned out Kh卯m had been killed by an arrow loosed by Andr贸g, who was then forced to break his bow and arrows, and T煤rin repenting offered his service to M卯m. For this reason M卯m tolerated the outlaws, and although he never loved T煤rin, the dwarf at least came to respect him.

When Beleg C煤thalion arrived at Amon R没dh, M卯m was angry: he hated elves, especially the Sindar. Nevertheless, he had to tolerate the elf in his halls. This hatred toward Beleg led M卯m to betray Amon R没dh to Morgoth. After Amon R没dh was betrayed to Morgoth, all the outlaws were slain, save T煤rin and Beleg. Beleg was left tied up on the summit of Amon R没dh by the orcs, and there M卯m found him and attempted to kill him but was scared away by a dying outlaw called Andr贸g. M卯m escaped, but it seems Ib没n was killed by Orcs. Eventually M卯m made his way to ruined Nargothrond after T煤rin had killed the dragon Glaurung, and took the treasure for his own.

H煤rin Thalion, who had seen all that had happened to his son T煤rin with Morgoth's eyes, came across M卯m in Nargothrond, and killed him, deeming him partially responsible for T煤rin's fate. H煤rin took the Nauglam铆r, the Necklace of the Dwarves, and brought it to Thingol. The Necklace was later the cause of the ruin of Doriath.

In the earlier conception of the mythology, found in The Book of Lost Tales but abandoned before The Silmarillion was written, M卯m was set as the guardian of the gold of Nargothrond by Glaurung. When H煤rin killed M卯m, the latter cursed the gold with his dying words. H煤rin and his band of outlaws then transported the treasure to Thingol, and the cursed gold was the cause of ruin of Doriath. The curse also caused the destruction of the Dwarven army which invaded Doriath by the hands of a host of wood-elves led by Beren, who took the Nauglam铆r and gave it to L煤thien. The curse on the necklace cause L煤thien to fade quicker. The curse also caused the sons of F毛anor to attack Dior, son of Beren.

Ib没n[edit]

Ib没n, the son of M卯m, was one of the last of the Petty-dwarves.

Kh卯m[edit]

Kh卯m, the son of M卯m, was one of the last of the Petty-dwarves. He was slain by Andr贸g, a man of T煤rin's company.

See also[edit]

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References[edit]

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Other sources[edit]


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