The Forgotten Battalion

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The Forgotten Battalion
Directed byMark A. Smith
Release date
  • November 24, 2020 (2020-11-24)

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The Forgotten Battalion is a 2019 documentary film directed by Mark A. Smith.[1] The film follows the 2nd Battalion, 7th Marine Regiment (2/7), one of the toughest and hardest hit during their tour in Afghanistan.[2] In 2008, 1,200 members deployed to cover a territory the size of Oregon, engaging in heavy combat with insurgent elements with no air support and beyond supply lines due to military cutbacks, they routinely ran short on food, water, and ammunition. Upon returning home, they soon discovered the horror of war and the challenges of surviving were not over.[3] Their suicide rate is approximately four times the rate for other young vets and 14 times the average for most Americans.[4]

The film was produced in 2019 by Winter State Entertainment and was picked up by Gravitas Ventures in 2020,[5] was released on November 24, 2020.[6]

The film features decorated Afghanistan war veterans: Cpl. Christopher Bryde, Sgt. Wes Walker,[7] LCpl. Andrew Brodehl,[8] LCpl. Rodney Chaney, Cpl. Adam Ersepke, HM3 Ryan Magsayo,[9] HM1 Kyle Newton, Sgt. Chris Paradis, Sgt. Peter Rezac, and LCpl. Nathan Smith. As well as shots with other decorated 2/7 Marines: Devin Bentz, Steven Paine, and Reese Threadgill. Also featured was Paul Bryde, a Navy Corpsman assisting onsite during filming.

It was primarily filmed in Tillamook County, Oregon, over the 2019 Memorial Day Weekend. Filming locations include the coastal towns of Rockaway Beach and Garibaldi, the coastal mountain range, and Pacific Ocean on board with Garibaldi Charters.

References[edit]

  1. "Winterstate Entertainment". Winterstate Entertainment. Retrieved 2020-11-17.
  2. North, Oliver (2015-03-25). "Report From a Forgotten War: Second in a Series". Fox News. Retrieved 2020-11-15.
  3. Philipps, Dave (2015-09-19). "In Unit Stalked by Suicide, Veterans Try to Save One Another (Published 2015)". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2020-11-15.
  4. "Delayed Suicides of "The Forgotten Battalion"". Psychiatric Times. Retrieved 2020-11-15.
  5. D'Alessandro, Anthony (2020-06-26). "Gravitas Ventures Picks Up Afghan War Vets PTSD Documentary 'The Forgotten Battalion'". Deadline. Retrieved 2020-11-14.
  6. "The Forgotten Battalion Blu-ray". Blu-ray.com. Retrieved November 19, 2020.
  7. Valley, South (2008-11-26). "SanBenito.com | Local awarded for saving Marines caught in firefight". SanBenito.com. Retrieved 2020-11-17.
  8. "081008-M-2322L-213". www.1stmardiv.marines.mil. Retrieved 2020-11-17.
  9. Guiliano, U. S. Marine Corps photo by Corporal Jason T. (2008-10-12), English: FARAH, Afghanistan (Oct. 12, 2008) Hospital Corpsman Ryan Magsayo, assigned to Golf Company, 2nd Battalion, 7th Marine Regiment, provides security during a patrol through the district of Bala Baluk in the Farah Province of Afghanistan. The 2nd Battalion is a reinforced light infantry battalion based out of Marine Air Ground Combat Center Twentynine Palms, California deployed to Afghanistan supporting Operation Enduring Freedom. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Corporal Jason T. Guiliano/Released), retrieved 2020-11-17


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