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Ursula Reinstein

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Ursula I. Reinstein (née Heczko) (born May 1964[1]) is an Austrian veterinarian and a microbiological researcher.

Early life and education[edit]

Born in Lohr am Main, Germany, Reinstein grew up in Munich. She attended the University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna and completed her doctoral thesis in cancer research, culminating in a peer-reviewed publication in the British Veterinary Journal on the sequence of an exon of the feline p53 gene-mutation in a lymphosarcoma.[2]

Career[edit]

Reinstein practiced in an animal veterinary office in Vienna, and then moved on to microbiology research and food-borne diseases. During the 1990s, she was appointed as the food control officer for the city of Vienna.

In 1998, she began a post-doctoral position in the biotechnology laboratory of Brett Finlay OC OBC FRSC, an expert on the molecular understanding of the ways bacteria infect their hosts, at the University of British Columbia (UBC), Vancouver. During her three-year tenure, Reinstein published six peer-reviewed scientific papers.[3][4][5][6][7][8][9]

File:SegmentedFillamentousBacteria.png
Scanning electron micrographs depicting segmented filamentous bacteria and a lack of colonization of EPEC

While at UBC, Reinstein (under her maiden name Heczko), discovered a probiotic means of preventing infection by E. coli. After failing repeatedly to achieve a standard model of infection by inoculation of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli into a set of experimental rabbits, she performed electron microscope studies to try to understand why these animals were seemingly immune to the pathogen. This led to her discovery of and later publishing that segmented filamentous bacteria prevent colonization of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli O103 in rabbits, making the cover of The Journal of Infectious Diseases.[7]

Reinstein has also been published by the American Journal of Physiology[10] and contributed to the peer-reviewed Emerging Infectious Diseases published by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.[11]

In 2001, Reinstein and three colleagues completed a study about enteropathogenic Escherichia coli infection. Supported by a Howard Hughes International Research Scholar Award and a grant from the Medical Research Council of Canada, the findings were published by the American Society for Microbiology.[9]

Personal life[edit]

Reinstein and ophthalmologist Dan Reinstein met and married in Vancouver, Canada. In 2001, they moved to the UK, where they live in central London with their three children, Julia, Maxwell and Oscar.[12] She continues to work in research-related activity at the London Vision Clinic, where she has been a director since 2007.[1]

Publications[edit]

  • Heczko, Ursula; Carthy, Chris M; O'Brien, Bronwyn A; Finlay, B Brett (2001). "Decreased Apoptosis in the Ileum and Ileal Peyer's Patches: a Feature after Infection with Rabbit Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli O103". Infection and Immunity. 69 (7): 4580–4589.
  • Heczko, Ursula; Smith, Valerie C; Meloche, R Mark; Buchan, Alison MJ; Finlay, B Brett (2000). "Characteristics of Helicobacter pylori attachment to human primary antral epithelial cells". Microbes and Infection. 2 (14): 1669–1676.
  • Heczko, U; Abe, A; Finlay, BB (March 2000). "Segmented filamentous bacteria prevent colonization of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli O103 in rabbits". The Journal of Infectious Diseases. 181 (3): 1027–33.
  • Heczko, Ursula; Abe, Akio; Finlay, B Brett (2000). "In vivo interactions of rabbit enteropathogenic Escherichia coli O103 with its host: an electron microscopic and histopathologic study". Microbes and Infection. 2 (1): 5–16. PMID 10717535.
  • Raupach, B; Mecsas, J; Heczko, U; Falkow, S; Finlay, BB (1999). "Bacterial epithelial cell cross talk": 137–161.
  • Abe, Akio; Heczko, Ursula; Hegele, Richard G; Finlay, B Brett (1998). "Two enteropathogenic Escherichia coli type III secreted proteins, EspA and EspB, are virulence factors". Journal of Experimental Medicine. 188 (10): 1907–1916.
  • Richter-Dahlfors, Agneta; Heczko, Ursula; Meloche, R Mark; Finlay, B Brett; Buchan, Alison MJ (1998). "Helicobacter pylori-infected human antral primary cell cultures: effect on gastrin cell function". American Journal of Physiology. Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology. 275 (3): G393–G401.
  • Mayr, B; Heczko, U; Schellander, K; Schleger, W; Reifinger, M (Jul 1993). "Sequence of an exon of the feline p53 gene--mutation in a lymphosarcom". The British Veterinary Journal. 149 (4): 387–90.

References[edit]

  1. 1.0 1.1 "Ursula REINSTEIN - Personal Appointments". beta.companieshouse.gov.uk. Retrieved 2019-01-04.
  2. Mayr, B; Heczko, U; Schellander, K; Schleger, W; Reifinger, M (July 1993). "Sequence of an exon of the feline p53 gene--mutation in a lymphosarcoma". The British Veterinary Journal. 149 (4): 387–90. doi:10.1016/S0007-1935(05)80077-6. PMID 8221043.
  3. Richter-Dahlfors, A; Heczko, U; Meloche, RM; Finlay, BB; Buchan, AM (September 1998). "Helicobacter pylori-infected human antral primary cell cultures: effect on gastrin cell function". 275 (3 Pt 1). The American Journal of Physiology: G393–401. PMID 9724249.
  4. Abe, A; Heczko, U; Hegele, RG; Brett Finlay, B (16 November 1998). "Two enteropathogenic Escherichia coli type III secreted proteins, EspA and EspB, are virulence factors". The Journal of Experimental Medicine. 188 (10): 1907–16. PMC 2212403. PMID 9815268.
  5. Raupach, B; Mecsas, J; Heczko, U; Falkow, S; Finlay, BB (1999). "Bacterial epithelial cell cross talk". Current Topics in Microbiology and Immunology. 236: 137–61. PMID 9893359.
  6. Heczko, U; Abe, A; Finlay, BB (January 2000). "In vivo interactions of rabbit enteropathogenic Escherichia coli O103 with its host: an electron microscopic and histopathologic study". Microbes and Infection. 2 (1): 5–16. PMID 10717535.
  7. 7.0 7.1 Heczko, U; Abe, A; Finlay, BB (March 2000). "Segmented filamentous bacteria prevent colonization of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli O103 in rabbits". The Journal of Infectious Diseases. 181 (3): 1027–33. doi:10.1086/315348. PMID 10720527.
  8. Heczko, U; Smith, VC; Mark Meloche, R; Buchan, AM; Finlay, BB (November 2000). "Characteristics of Helicobacter pylori attachment to human primary antral epithelial cells". Microbes and Infection. 2 (14): 1669–76. PMID 11137040.
  9. 9.0 9.1 Heczko, U; Carthy, CM; O'Brien, BA; Finlay, BB (July 2001). "Decreased apoptosis in the ileum and ileal Peyer's patches: a feature after infection with rabbit enteropathogenic Escherichia coli O103". Infection and Immunity. 69 (7): 4580–9. doi:10.1128/IAI.69.7.4580-4589.2001. PMC 98535. PMID 11402002.
  10. Agneta Richter-Dahlfors, Ursula Heczko; et al. (September 1998). "Helicobacter pylori-infected human antral primary cell cultures: effect on gastrin cell function". American Journal of Physiology. Retrieved 2019-01-16.
  11. "Enteropathogenic E. coli, Salmonella, and Shigella: Masters of Host Cell Cytoskeletal Exploitation". 5 (2). Emerging Infectious Diseases. March–April 1999. Retrieved 2019-01-17.CS1 maint: Date format (link)
  12. Interview by Ria Higgins (2007-05-13). "A life in the day: Prof Dan Reinstein". The Sunday Times. Retrieved 2019-01-05.

External links[edit]


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