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Wrapunzel

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Essential Tools for Head Wrapping[edit]

Head wrappers, bald or with hair, need certain tools to hold their scarves on their heads securely.[1] These tools help wrappers achieve a more polished look or wrap shape, or imitate a different style.
There are many types of what head wrappers call "essential tools." There are headbands made from gripping velvet fabric that hold scarves in place with friction. Shapers, caps filled with Polyester Fiberfill, create a rounded look under the scarf and are often secured with a band of Wrapunzel (pronounced (/rəˈpʌnzəl/) is a mobilization of individuals worldwide who cover their heads with headscarves. Wrapunzel allows these individuals to connect socially, locate supplies, learn and exchange wrapping techniques and gather together in appreciation of head wrapping as an expressive art form, as well as a religious practice.

History[edit]

Wrapunzel began in December 2012[2], when its founder Andrea Grinberg Herzog noticed that her personal blog posts and video tutorials regarding hair covering with a scarf, or tichel, were steadily gaining popularity.
She was newly married and had just moved to the United States from Israel, where seeing women who wear scarves on their heads is more common. Andrea Grinberg Herzog quickly realized that women in the United States needed knowledge of head wrapping techniques. In addition, she noticed that many women deciding to cover their hair out of religious obligation found this tenet difficult and tedious. She wanted to share her love of head wrapping and make it easier for her fellow wrappers to do so with enthusiasm.[3]
Andrea Grinberg Herzog then decided to form a global community and movement devoted solely to the art of head wrapping. During its first year, Andrea Grinberg Herzog was its sole organizer and teacher. She devoted all her time and energy to this forum for head wrappers, which would be called Wrapunzel.
A large international social media community of head wrappers was steadily developing at the same time Andrea Grinberg Herzog created Wrapunzel. Her personal blog soon became so popular with fellow head wrappers that Andrea Grinberg Herzog decided to grow the blog and video tutorials into a business. Joined by other local business partners,[4] Andrea Grinberg Herzog opened an online store in January 2014, providing high quality, reasonably priced head wrapping supplies to customers all over the world.[5]
In-person Wrapunzel Events and Wrapunzel Boutiques also began to bring head wrapping supplies, as well as demonstrations of head wrapping techniques, to various cities in the United States, Canada, Israel, and Europe.[6]
Wrapunzel Boutiques were opened from 2016 until 2019, in multiple locations worldwide, to provide local communities hands-on access to head wrapping supplies. Trained and experienced head wrappers own and run these Boutiques and advise their communities on scarves, accessories, and styles.[7]
At Wrapunzel Events, stylists perform demonstrations to allow participants to see how a particular style is achieved. Experienced head wrap stylists come to the events to share their skills and encourage others. Andrea Grinberg Herzog also speaks at these events about the spiritual and emotional benefits of head wrapping.[8]
The Wrapunzel Foundation was created in 2015 to bring head wrapping supplies to those facing hair loss due to medical adversity. Wrapping their heads helps these patients retain their dignity and feel beautiful during this trying time.[9]

The Wrapunzel Movement[edit]

Andrea Grinberg Herzog[edit]

Andrea Grinberg Herzog's vision for the Wrapunzel Community is to spread joy and connection among those that cover their heads with headscarves or head coverings. The enjoyment and art of head wrapping is what joins mostly women in this multicultural, interfaith, global community.
Andrea Grinberg Herzog, despite beginning to cover her hair with scarves out of religious observance, found she loved this form of self-expression.[10] Andrea began to experiment with styles and supplies and grew her repertoire of head wraps. She wanted to share her styles with others, since other people often complimented her on her head wraps. [11] Andrea found that others wanted to learn how she achieved these looks, so she created a blog and video tutorials.
"The Wrapunzel Blog: Inspire Happiness With the Art of Hair Wrapping," developed when Andrea Grinberg Herzog's personal blog,[12] originally focused on other topics, became inundated with head wrapping content as she began to share her ideas.
She created the Wrapunzel Blog in January of 2013, and blog visits number almost 2,300,800 as of January 2020.[13] The blog features a wealth of material, such as links to video tutorials, wrapping ideas and inspiration, and spotlights women from all walks of life who wrap. Topics include storage ideas, wrapping in the professional world,[14] and more.

Who Wraps[edit]

The majority of head wrappers do so out of religious obligation or for purposes of cultural identity. [15] Muslim women and married Jewish women constitute the bulk of women who cover their hair or heads, but many others do so as well. Many Christian and Catholic women cover during prayer and even daily life [16]. Amish, Sikh[17] and Pagan women and men may choose to cover their heads during worship and daily life. Women from numerous African traditional faiths also cover their heads.
Many individuals cover solely for reasons of personal conviction as a connection to their inner selves, and not because of any faith-based or cultural tradition.[18]
There is a growing subset of head wrappers that do so purely for style. [19] Celebrity musicians Erykah Badu and Alicia Keys brought wrapping to the fashion forefront and into the spotlight as part of their self-expression and trademark look. In addition, head wrapping has enjoyed a renaissance as Bohemian style, Boho-chic, Retro Style and Streetwear fashion trends have continued to grow in popularity.
Many women find covering their hair and wearing modest fashion as ways to reclaim their confidence and sense of self-worth following abusive relationships.[20]
Many women decide to begin head wrapping after experiencing hair loss from medical adversity, and they are strengthened by the encouraging words and thoughts of head wrapping peers. This includes women suffering hair loss due to chemotherapy, alopecia, autoimmune diseases, trichotillomania, balding, and postpartum hormonal changes.[21]

Social Media[edit]

Facebook[edit]

To facilitate communication amongst head wrappers, a head wrapping novice created the Wrapunzel Community Group (previously known as the Wrapunzel Fangroup) on Facebook, in January 2014.[22] The Group is a safe space where head wrappers of all types share their head wrapping creations, new styles, and stories relating to head wrapping with their peers. Close to 6,000 Group members (as of January, 2020) share tips and tricks, as well as pictures and demonstrations within this accessible, inclusive social media forum. [23]
Group members post topics for dialogue, photos, and trade advice for where to find wrapping supplies; scarves, shapers, accessories, etc. Covering styles of every religion, ethnicity and culture are represented and celebrated in the Group. Strict guidelines are enforced by administrators of the Group so that everyone always feels warmly welcomed and encouraged. Positivity, good thoughts and communal support are important factors that help keep this online group of many nationalities and religions growing.[24]

Instagram[edit]

In addition to the Facebook Community Group, Andrea Grinberg Herzog and Wrapunzel maintain an active Instagram page with followers numbering almost 7,000 as of January, 2020.[25] She posts images of head wrapping styles and supplies.

Youtube[edit]

Andrea Grinberg Herzog and Wrapunzel maintain a video archive of wrapping tutorials. Andrea Grinberg Herzog has produced many videos explaining how to create each style. Some style consultants also contribute to this catalog, sharing their unique creations and techniques.[26] Head wrappers all over the world use these videos as a resource in their wrapping.

Foundation[edit]

Andrea Grinberg Herzog saw the need to focus on reaching out to women experiencing medical-related hair loss, and she created the Wrapunzel Foundation [27]in 2015. The Wrapunzel Foundation is a 501c3 organization.
The Wrapunzel Foundation provides, at no cost to the recipient, basic needs for beginner head wrappers in the form of a "Care Kit," to head wrappers around the globe, as well as organizing events targeted specifically to these patients during treatment.[28] The Wrapunzel Foundation has distributed over 320 Care Kits to women in need.[29]
Women use the Foundation Care Kits' contents to feel beautiful inside and out, and to boost their confidence and morale. In addition, head wrapping provides physical comfort while healing, and may help stave off unkind, unsolicited comments. Customers of the Wrapunzel Store have the option to donate to the Foundation along with their purchase. Since its inception, gripping velvet fabric. In addition, bulky ponytail/bun holders also known as scrunchies, aid in increasing the volume of one’s natural hair.[30]
Head wrappers often use these items in combination, according to the look they wish to achieve. Each tool is designed to make head covering easier and more attractive.
Before Andrea Grinberg Herzog created Wrapunzel, it was very hard for those who wanted to these tools to find them. Many head wrappers resorted to using old pantyhose, empty plastic bags, bath poufs and other random items to create the full, rounded wrap shape they desired.[31] Many used bobby pins or other painful hair clips to secure their scarves to their heads throughout the day.[32] Not only are these homemade tools uncomfortable and unwieldy, but their removal often results in hair breakage and loss.

Other Terms for Head Wraps[edit]

The etymology of head wraps is vast. While the English word scarf is most often used to describe the head coverings, other religions and traditions have their own, unique vocabulary. For example, in Judaism, the term for the individual scarf used in a headwrap, or term for the entire covering, is tichel or mitpachat. In Islam, terms used are khimar or hijab. Other popular terms for head wrap include, but aren't limited to, veil, wimple, headscarf, mantilla, dupatta, kerchief, turban, or gele/head tie.[33]

See Also[edit]


Other articles of the topic Fashion : Papa Joe Aviance, Mathias le Fèvre, Going commando, Lana Austin, Mufti (brand), Saiid Kobeisy, Vratim (brand)
Some use of "" in your query was not closed by a matching "".Some use of "" in your query was not closed by a matching "".

  • Head tie
  • Tichel
  • Snood
  • Hijab
  • Veil
  • Turban
  • Headscarf
  • Headgear

References[edit]

  1. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SlnOfvhfgk4&t=13s
  2. https://wrapunzel.com/about/
  3. https://www.nashimmagazine.com/in-the-spotlight-april-2018 "IN THE SPOTLIGHT WITH ANDREA GRINBERG / WRAPUNZEL.COM"
  4. Barbara Bensoussan, "IT'S A WRAP", "Mishpacha", June 25 2014
  5. https://wrapunzel.com/
  6. Ebony Brown, "Head Wrapping Team Hosts Baltimore Event", Jewish Times, June 12 2014
  7. What's a Wrapunzel boutique?
  8. https://wrapunzel.com/events/
  9. https://wrapunzelfoundation.org/about-the-foundation/
  10. Batya Rosner, "Something to Wrap Your Head Around", "Orthodox Union", June 4 2015
  11. Sandy Eller, "Knot Your Typical Tichel", "JewishPress", September 7 2018
  12. https://andreagrinberg.com/
  13. https://wrapunzelblog.com/about-3/
  14. Shari Rosen, "Wrapping in a Corporate Professional Office Environment: Part 2", "WrapunzelBlog", December 14 2019
  15. [Courtney Stars, "That time that I decided to cover my hair everyday", "Medium", March 11 2018
  16. Dr. Rivkah Lambert Adler, "Why Christian Women are Taking Up Jewish Practice of Hair Wrapping", "Breaking Israel News", April 1 2016
  17. https://www.headcovers.com/resources/hats-scarves/religious-head-coverings/
  18. https://www.facebook.com/groups/wrapunzelcommunity/
  19. Frances Kai-Hwa Wang, "Fashion, faith and culture come together through the global art of head wrapping", "PRI", October 27 2017
  20. Ally Pockrass, "Why These Secular Jewish Women Are Covering Their Hair", "Alma", March 8 2018
  21. https://wrapunzelfoundation.org/testimonials/
  22. https://www.facebook.com/groups/wrapunzelcommunity/
  23. Steven Davidson, "The Facebook Group Where Muslim, Jewish and Christian Women Celebrate Headwrapping", "Forward", December 13 2017
  24. https://www.facebook.com/groups/wrapunzelcommunity/
  25. https://www.instagram.com/wrapunzel_ladies/
  26. https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC2XCTY8ZiotLYahaaianj-w/videos
  27. https://wrapunzelfoundation.org/
  28. https://wrapunzelfoundation.org/current-projects/
  29. https://wrapunzelfoundation.org/
  30. https://wrapunzel.com/product-category/essential-tools/
  31. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pm8Thk3sHjU
  32. https://www.facebook.com/groups/wrapunzelcommunity/
  33. Liana Aghajanian, "The Complicated History of Headscarves", "Racked", December 20 2016

Essential Tools for Head Wrapping[edit]

Head wrappers, bald or with hair, need certain tools to hold their scarves on their heads securely.[1] These tools help wrappers achieve a more polished look or wrap shape, or imitate a different style.
There are many types of what head wrappers call "essential tools." There are headbands made from gripping velvet fabric that hold scarves in place with friction. Shapers, caps filled with Polyester Fiberfill, create a rounded look under the scarf and are often secured with a band of Wrapunzel (pronounced (/rəˈpʌnzəl/) is a mobilization of individuals worldwide who cover their heads with headscarves. Wrapunzel allows these individuals to connect socially, locate supplies, learn and exchange wrapping techniques and gather together in appreciation of head wrapping as an expressive art form, as well as a religious practice.

History[edit]

Wrapunzel began in December 2012[2], when its founder Andrea Grinberg Herzog noticed that her personal blog posts and video tutorials regarding hair covering with a scarf, or tichel, were steadily gaining popularity.
She was newly married and had just moved to the United States from Israel, where seeing women who wear scarves on their heads is more common. Andrea Grinberg Herzog quickly realized that women in the United States needed knowledge of head wrapping techniques. In addition, she noticed that many women deciding to cover their hair out of religious obligation found this tenet difficult and tedious. She wanted to share her love of head wrapping and make it easier for her fellow wrappers to do so with enthusiasm.[3]
Andrea Grinberg Herzog then decided to form a global community and movement devoted solely to the art of head wrapping. During its first year, Andrea Grinberg Herzog was its sole organizer and teacher. She devoted all her time and energy to this forum for head wrappers, which would be called Wrapunzel.
A large international social media community of head wrappers was steadily developing at the same time Andrea Grinberg Herzog created Wrapunzel. Her personal blog soon became so popular with fellow head wrappers that Andrea Grinberg Herzog decided to grow the blog and video tutorials into a business. Joined by other local business partners,[4] Andrea Grinberg Herzog opened an online store in January 2014, providing high quality, reasonably priced head wrapping supplies to customers all over the world.[5]
In-person Wrapunzel Events and Wrapunzel Boutiques also began to bring head wrapping supplies, as well as demonstrations of head wrapping techniques, to various cities in the United States, Canada, Israel, and Europe.[6]
Wrapunzel Boutiques were opened from 2016 until 2019, in multiple locations worldwide, to provide local communities hands-on access to head wrapping supplies. Trained and experienced head wrappers own and run these Boutiques and advise their communities on scarves, accessories, and styles.[7]
At Wrapunzel Events, stylists perform demonstrations to allow participants to see how a particular style is achieved. Experienced head wrap stylists come to the events to share their skills and encourage others. Andrea Grinberg Herzog also speaks at these events about the spiritual and emotional benefits of head wrapping.[8]
The Wrapunzel Foundation was created in 2015 to bring head wrapping supplies to those facing hair loss due to medical adversity. Wrapping their heads helps these patients retain their dignity and feel beautiful during this trying time.[9]

The Wrapunzel Movement[edit]

Andrea Grinberg Herzog[edit]

Andrea Grinberg Herzog's vision for the Wrapunzel Community is to spread joy and connection among those that cover their heads with headscarves or head coverings. The enjoyment and art of head wrapping is what joins mostly women in this multicultural, interfaith, global community.
Andrea Grinberg Herzog, despite beginning to cover her hair with scarves out of religious observance, found she loved this form of self-expression.[10] Andrea began to experiment with styles and supplies and grew her repertoire of head wraps. She wanted to share her styles with others, since other people often complimented her on her head wraps. [11] Andrea found that others wanted to learn how she achieved these looks, so she created a blog and video tutorials.
"The Wrapunzel Blog: Inspire Happiness With the Art of Hair Wrapping," developed when Andrea Grinberg Herzog's personal blog,[12] originally focused on other topics, became inundated with head wrapping content as she began to share her ideas.
She created the Wrapunzel Blog in January of 2013, and blog visits number almost 2,300,800 as of January 2020.[13] The blog features a wealth of material, such as links to video tutorials, wrapping ideas and inspiration, and spotlights women from all walks of life who wrap. Topics include storage ideas, wrapping in the professional world,[14] and more.

Who Wraps[edit]

The majority of head wrappers do so out of religious obligation or for purposes of cultural identity. [15] Muslim women and married Jewish women constitute the bulk of women who cover their hair or heads, but many others do so as well. Many Christian and Catholic women cover during prayer and even daily life [16]. Amish, Sikh[17] and Pagan women and men may choose to cover their heads during worship and daily life. Women from numerous African traditional faiths also cover their heads.
Many individuals cover solely for reasons of personal conviction as a connection to their inner selves, and not because of any faith-based or cultural tradition.[18]
There is a growing subset of head wrappers that do so purely for style. [19] Celebrity musicians Erykah Badu and Alicia Keys brought wrapping to the fashion forefront and into the spotlight as part of their self-expression and trademark look. In addition, head wrapping has enjoyed a renaissance as Bohemian style, Boho-chic, Retro Style and Streetwear fashion trends have continued to grow in popularity.
Many women find covering their hair and wearing modest fashion as ways to reclaim their confidence and sense of self-worth following abusive relationships.[20]
Many women decide to begin head wrapping after experiencing hair loss from medical adversity, and they are strengthened by the encouraging words and thoughts of head wrapping peers. This includes women suffering hair loss due to chemotherapy, alopecia, autoimmune diseases, trichotillomania, balding, and postpartum hormonal changes.[21]

Social Media[edit]

Facebook[edit]

To facilitate communication amongst head wrappers, a head wrapping novice created the Wrapunzel Community Group (previously known as the Wrapunzel Fangroup) on Facebook, in January 2014.[22] The Group is a safe space where head wrappers of all types share their head wrapping creations, new styles, and stories relating to head wrapping with their peers. Close to 6,000 Group members (as of January, 2020) share tips and tricks, as well as pictures and demonstrations within this accessible, inclusive social media forum. [23]
Group members post topics for dialogue, photos, and trade advice for where to find wrapping supplies; scarves, shapers, accessories, etc. Covering styles of every religion, ethnicity and culture are represented and celebrated in the Group. Strict guidelines are enforced by administrators of the Group so that everyone always feels warmly welcomed and encouraged. Positivity, good thoughts and communal support are important factors that help keep this online group of many nationalities and religions growing.[24]

Instagram[edit]

In addition to the Facebook Community Group, Andrea Grinberg Herzog and Wrapunzel maintain an active Instagram page with followers numbering almost 7,000 as of January, 2020.[25] She posts images of head wrapping styles and supplies.

Youtube[edit]

Andrea Grinberg Herzog and Wrapunzel maintain a video archive of wrapping tutorials. Andrea Grinberg Herzog has produced many videos explaining how to create each style. Some style consultants also contribute to this catalog, sharing their unique creations and techniques.[26] Head wrappers all over the world use these videos as a resource in their wrapping.

Foundation[edit]

Andrea Grinberg Herzog saw the need to focus on reaching out to women experiencing medical-related hair loss, and she created the Wrapunzel Foundation [27]in 2015. The Wrapunzel Foundation is a 501c3 organization.
The Wrapunzel Foundation provides, at no cost to the recipient, basic needs for beginner head wrappers in the form of a "Care Kit," to head wrappers around the globe, as well as organizing events targeted specifically to these patients during treatment.[28] The Wrapunzel Foundation has distributed over 320 Care Kits to women in need.[29]
Women use the Foundation Care Kits' contents to feel beautiful inside and out, and to boost their confidence and morale. In addition, head wrapping provides physical comfort while healing, and may help stave off unkind, unsolicited comments. Customers of the Wrapunzel Store have the option to donate to the Foundation along with their purchase. Since its inception, gripping velvet fabric. In addition, bulky ponytail/bun holders also known as scrunchies, aid in increasing the volume of one’s natural hair.[30]
Head wrappers often use these items in combination, according to the look they wish to achieve. Each tool is designed to make head covering easier and more attractive.
Before Andrea Grinberg Herzog created Wrapunzel, it was very hard for those who wanted to these tools to find them. Many head wrappers resorted to using old pantyhose, empty plastic bags, bath poufs and other random items to create the full, rounded wrap shape they desired.[31] Many used bobby pins or other painful hair clips to secure their scarves to their heads throughout the day.[32] Not only are these homemade tools uncomfortable and unwieldy, but their removal often results in hair breakage and loss.

Other Terms for Head Wraps[edit]

The etymology of head wraps is vast. While the English word scarf is most often used to describe the head coverings, other religions and traditions have their own, unique vocabulary. For example, in Judaism, the term for the individual scarf used in a headwrap, or term for the entire covering, is tichel or mitpachat. In Islam, terms used are khimar or hijab. Other popular terms for head wrap include, but aren't limited to, veil, wimple, headscarf, mantilla, dupatta, kerchief, turban, or gele/head tie.[33]

See Also[edit]


Other articles of the topic Fashion : Mathias le Fèvre, Going commando, Lana Austin, Papa Joe Aviance, Juwelo, Saiid Kobeisy, Mufti (brand)
Some use of "" in your query was not closed by a matching "".Some use of "" in your query was not closed by a matching "".

  • Head tie
  • Tichel
  • Snood
  • Hijab
  • Veil
  • Turban
  • Headscarf
  • Headgear

References[edit]

  1. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SlnOfvhfgk4&t=13s
  2. https://wrapunzel.com/about/
  3. https://www.nashimmagazine.com/in-the-spotlight-april-2018 "IN THE SPOTLIGHT WITH ANDREA GRINBERG / WRAPUNZEL.COM"
  4. Barbara Bensoussan, "IT'S A WRAP", "Mishpacha", June 25 2014
  5. https://wrapunzel.com/
  6. Ebony Brown, "Head Wrapping Team Hosts Baltimore Event", Jewish Times, June 12 2014
  7. What's a Wrapunzel boutique?
  8. https://wrapunzel.com/events/
  9. https://wrapunzelfoundation.org/about-the-foundation/
  10. Batya Rosner, "Something to Wrap Your Head Around", "Orthodox Union", June 4 2015
  11. Sandy Eller, "Knot Your Typical Tichel", "JewishPress", September 7 2018
  12. https://andreagrinberg.com/
  13. https://wrapunzelblog.com/about-3/
  14. Shari Rosen, "Wrapping in a Corporate Professional Office Environment: Part 2", "WrapunzelBlog", December 14 2019
  15. [Courtney Stars, "That time that I decided to cover my hair everyday", "Medium", March 11 2018
  16. Dr. Rivkah Lambert Adler, "Why Christian Women are Taking Up Jewish Practice of Hair Wrapping", "Breaking Israel News", April 1 2016
  17. https://www.headcovers.com/resources/hats-scarves/religious-head-coverings/
  18. https://www.facebook.com/groups/wrapunzelcommunity/
  19. Frances Kai-Hwa Wang, "Fashion, faith and culture come together through the global art of head wrapping", "PRI", October 27 2017
  20. Ally Pockrass, "Why These Secular Jewish Women Are Covering Their Hair", "Alma", March 8 2018
  21. https://wrapunzelfoundation.org/testimonials/
  22. https://www.facebook.com/groups/wrapunzelcommunity/
  23. Steven Davidson, "The Facebook Group Where Muslim, Jewish and Christian Women Celebrate Headwrapping", "Forward", December 13 2017
  24. https://www.facebook.com/groups/wrapunzelcommunity/
  25. https://www.instagram.com/wrapunzel_ladies/
  26. https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC2XCTY8ZiotLYahaaianj-w/videos
  27. https://wrapunzelfoundation.org/
  28. https://wrapunzelfoundation.org/current-projects/
  29. https://wrapunzelfoundation.org/
  30. https://wrapunzel.com/product-category/essential-tools/
  31. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pm8Thk3sHjU
  32. https://www.facebook.com/groups/wrapunzelcommunity/
  33. Liana Aghajanian, "The Complicated History of Headscarves", "Racked", December 20 2016


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