Zinger

From EverybodyWiki Bios & Wiki



Zinger
Private
Subsidiary
ISIN🆔
IndustryRetail
Online shopping
E-commerce
Founded 📆
Founder 👔
Headquarters 🏙️Colonial Heights, Virginia
Area served 🗺️
Contiguous United States
Key people
Mark Gordon
(Chairman, CEO)
Products 📟 Powered mobility chair in the durable medical equipment product category
Members
Number of employees
ParentfirstSTREET for Boomers and Beyond, Inc.
🌐 Websitewww.zingerchair.com
📇 Address
📞 telephone

Zinger is a portable powered mobility chair[1] manufactured by firstSTREET for Boomers and Beyond, Inc.,[2] a privately held online direct marketer of “unique and innovative products”[3] specifically designed for older adults. The Zinger brand incorporates new technology in the powered mobility chairs which make them similar to but not categorized as mobility scooters, powerchairs, electric-powered wheelchairs, motorized wheelchairs or electric wheelchairs. There are also related accessories available for the chair to further assist with mobility.

Headquartered in Colonial Heights, Virginia, the company currently distributes its products to the contiguous United States only via online shopping and catalog marketing.

History and Technology[edit]

The Zinger chair began as the brainchild of inventors Royce H. Husted[4] and Joel P. Husted[5][6] who both currently live in Forest, Virginia.

The Zinger was awarded four U.S. patents that are revolutionary to the mobility industry and sets it apart from wheelchairs, motorized wheelchairs, electric wheelchairs and power chairs.

The United States patents are:

  1. 6273212, Lightweight maneuverable power chair[7]
  2. 6371228, Stable powered tricycle with traction steering[8]
  3. 9050226, Lightweight folding motorized chair with mechanical traction steering[9]
  4. D765565, Frame tubes of a folding motorized chair[10]


There are five distinguishable properties of the Zinger chair which set it apart from wheelchairs, powerchairs and other mobility devices:

  1. Zinger measures 25 inches (63.5 centimeters) from the floor to the top of the arm rests[11] which enables the chair to pull up to and under all public seating and standard tables or desks.</ref>[12][13] The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) dictates that all public seating must be a minimum of 27 inches (68.58 centimeters) from the floor to the bottom of the table surface.[14]
  2. Instead of a typical joystick controller, the Zinger uses a Two Lever Control System,[15] one on each side of the seat,[16] to drive the chair.
  3. Like other portable mobility chairs, the Zinger can be folded for easy transport in a car. However, what distinguishes a Zinger from the typical mobility chair is that it folds down to 10 inches high[17][18] and flat like a lawn chair.[19]
  4. The total weight of a Zinger is 42 pounds (19.05 kilograms) including the battery or 38 pounds (17 kilograms) with the battery removed[20] making it the lightest mobility chair on the market to date.[21][22][23]
  5. Footrests or foot plates are usually standard features on all wheelchairs except for sports wheelchairs and rigid wheelchairs. Zinger also has a foot plate, however, it’s the only mobility chair that has a Swing-Away Foot Plate.[24][25][26] This allows the individual driving the chair to swing the foot plate out of the way[27][28] and place their feet unobstructed to either stand up or push backwards. The Zinger does have a powered reverse function.[29][30]

Marketing[edit]

Zinger employs the “zing” that the name begins with in various marketing efforts as a reference to the speed that the powered chair can reach while remaining easy to maneuver.

Recognition[edit]

Disabled Living Product of the Month at the Kidz Exhibitions, Manchester, (July 2015)[31][32][33]

References[edit]

  1. "Global Wheelchairs (Powered and Manual) Strategic Business Report 2016: Invacare - The Leading Wheelchair Manufacturer in the World". GlobeNewswire. Global Industry Analysts, Inc. GlobeNewswire, Inc. 24 Oct 2016. Retrieved 20 May 2018.
  2. "Company Overview of firstSTREET for Boomers and Beyond, Inc.,". Bloomberg. Bloomberg L.P. Retrieved 20 May 2018.
  3. Lohmann, Bill (16 Jun 2008). "Business is boomers". Richmond Times-Dispatch (16 Jun 2008). BH Media Group, Inc. Retrieved 20 May 2018.
  4. "Patents by Inventor Royce H. Husted". JUSTIA Patents. Justia. Retrieved 12 May 2018.
  5. "Patents by Inventor Joel P. Husted". JUSTIA Patents. Justia. Retrieved 12 May 2018.
  6. "Patents by Inventor Joel Husted". JUSTIA Patents. Justia. Retrieved 12 May 2018.
  7. "Lightweight maneuverable power chair". USPTO PATENT FULL-TEXT AND IMAGE DATABASE. United States Patent. 14 Aug 2001. Retrieved 12 May 2018.
  8. "Stable powered tricycle with traction steering". USPTO PATENT FULL-TEXT AND IMAGE DATABASE. United States Patent. 16 Aug 2002. Retrieved 12 May 2018.
  9. "Lightweight folding motorized chair with mechanical traction steering". USPTO PATENT FULL-TEXT AND IMAGE DATABASE. United States Patent. 9 Jun 2015. Retrieved 12 May 2018.
  10. "Frame tubes of a folding motorized chair". USPTO PATENT FULL-TEXT AND IMAGE DATABASE. United States Patent. 6 Sep 2016. Retrieved 12 May 2018.
  11. "Zinger FAQ". Zinger. firstSTREET, Inc. Retrieved 22 May 2018.
  12. "Naidex 2017: top 5 mobility aids". Disability Horizons. DH Media Group. 13 Feb 2017. Retrieved 10 May 2018.
  13. "Scottish Exhibition and Conference Centre". www.sec.co.uk. Scottish Exhibition and Conference Centre. 7 Oct 2015. Retrieved 7 Oct 2015.
  14. "Appendix A to Part 1191 - Americans wi th Disabilities Act (ADA) Accessibility Guidelines for Buildings and Facilities" (4.32.3). ADA.gov. U.S. Department of Justice. p. 66. Retrieved 19 May 2018.
  15. Podmedic (7 Oct 2014). "Zinger is Powered Wheelchair of the Future (podcast video)". Health Tech Weekly. HT Weekly. Retrieved 21 May 2018.
  16. Coxworth, Ben (16 Jul 2014). "Zinger is claimed to be the world's lightest electric wheelchair". New Atlas. GIZMAG PTY LTD. Retrieved 20 May 2018.
  17. "Discover The Zinger Advantage". Zinger. firstSTREET, Inc. Retrieved 10 May 2018.
  18. The OT Magazine. United Kingdom: 2A Publishing Ltd. 6 Jun 2016. p. 54. Retrieved 2 May 2018. Search this book on Amazon.com Logo.png
  19. Gizmodo (31 Jul 2014). "This ultralight electric wheelchair folds up like a lawn chair". The Economic Times (16 Jun 2008). Bennett, Coleman & Co. Ltd. Retrieved 15 May 2018.
  20. "Zinger Chair with Arm Rests". firstSTREET. firstSTREET, Inc. Retrieved 22 May 2018.
  21. "INGER: THE WORLD'S LIGHTEST WHEELCHAIR". VirtualExpo. France: Medical EXPO. 13 Feb 2017. Retrieved 3 May 2018.
  22. "Zinger, the World's Lightest Electric Wheelchair". Medgadget. Medgadget, LLC. 18 Jul 2014. Retrieved 5 May 2018.
  23. Redding (28 Jul 2014). "17 kg The lightest in the world! Foldable electric wheelchair Zinger" (28 Jul 2014). Hong Kong: BMEDIA Limited. UNWIRE.HK. Retrieved 9 May 2018.
  24. "Lightweight maneuverable power chair". USPTO PATENT FULL-TEXT AND IMAGE DATABASE. United States Patent. 14 Aug 2001. Retrieved 12 May 2018.
  25. "Discover The Zinger Advantage". Zinger. United States: firstSTREET, Inc. Retrieved 2 May 2018.
  26. "Zinger Chair - Foot Rest" (Video). YouTube. Zinger Chair USA. 24 Apr 2018. Retrieved 11 May 2018.
  27. "Lightweight maneuverable power chair". USPTO PATENT FULL-TEXT AND IMAGE DATABASE. United States Patent. 14 Aug 2001. Retrieved 12 May 2018.
  28. Kwan, Megan (26 Feb 2016). "Zinger: The Lightest Folding Wheelchair". PPINKA. PPINKA. Retrieved 2 May 2018.
  29. "FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS". Zinger. firstSTREET, Inc. Retrieved 2 May 2018.
  30. Coxworth, Ben (16 Jul 2014). "Zinger is claimed to be the world's lightest electric wheelchair". New Atlas. GIZMAG PTY LTD.
  31. "Product of the Month". Disabled Living. Kidz Exhibitions, Manchester. 15 Jul 2015. Retrieved 16 May 2018.
  32. @zingerchair (15 Jul 2015). ""Staff of Disabled Living having fun on the @zingerchair. It's Product of the Month @KidzExhibitions."" (Tweet). Twitter. @zingerchair. Retrieved 15 May 2018.
  33. E-Goes (15 Jul 2015). "Product of the Month" (photograph). Twitter. Proactive Mobility Ltd.

External Links[edit]


This article "Zinger (mobility device)" is from Wikipedia. The list of its authors can be seen in its historical and/or the page Edithistory:Zinger (mobility device). Articles copied from Draft Namespace on Wikipedia could be seen on the Draft Namespace of Wikipedia and not main one.