Bhargav Sri Prakash

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Bhargav Sri Prakash
2015MedX-OralIgniteTalk.jpg 2015MedX-OralIgniteTalk.jpg
BornBhargav Sri Prakash
Chennai, India[1]
🏳️ NationalityIndian
🎓 Alma materUniversity of Michigan, Ann Arbor
College of Engineering, Guindy
💼 Occupation
Entrepreneur
Engineer
Investment Management
Tennis player
Board member ofFriendsLearn, Inc
Nirmana Investments
Shilpa Architects
👪 RelativesSheila Sri Prakash (mother)

Bhargav Sri Prakash is an Indian American entrepreneur known for pioneering advances in life science research and innovation in global health.[2][3][4] He is the inventor of digital vaccine technology for prevention of non-communicable[5][6] and infectious diseases[7][8] and is the founding research translation and innovation partner of the Digital Vaccine Project at Carnegie Mellon University. [9][10][11]

He is an engineer[12] based in silicon valley,[13][14][15] often counted among India's greatest and most inspiring inventors,[16] scientists[17] and deep tech entrepreneurs[18][19] on the world stage, for his accomplishments as a visionary designer, polymath and technologist,[20][21] as well as for positively impacting planetary health towards protecting the future of humanity.[22][23][24]

His work in user-centric, non-invasive and needle-less disease preventative medical technology for children and their families,[25][26] has been widely acclaimed as a groundbreaking pathway of "cutting edge research"[27] that is enabling a future of consumerized medicine.[28][29]

Sri Prakash has worked in gamification.[30][31][32] He is the founder and CEO of FriendsLearn,[33] and is the Chief of Product for Fooya,[34][35] which is a mobile app clinically proven to induce improvements in health of children.[36][37][38][39]

He is counted among the historically significant inventors and developers of the underlying technologies relating to networked virtual reality and synchronous-asynchronous multi-user interaction, going back to 2004, which are now being referred to as metaverse.[40][41]

He is a former professional tennis player[42][43] and junior national champion from India.[44][45]

Early life[edit]

File:Bhargav Sri Prakash Former Indian Junior Tennis Champion.jpg
Bhargav Sri Prakash Former Indian Tennis Champion (1991, Sportstar: published by The Hindu), Chennai, India)
File:RamanathanKrishnanAward.jpg
A photo of 13 year old Bhargav Sri Prakash being felicitated by Ramanathan Krishnan for winning the National Junior tennis championship
File:Bhargav Sri Prakash Final Day Keynote 2020 SRCC Business Conclave.png
2020 SRCC Business Conclave Final Day Keynote by Bhargav Sri Prakash

Bhargav Sri Prakash was born in Chennai, India.[1] He is the son of the architect, urban designer and artist Sheila Sri Prakash and M. V. Sri Prakash.[46]

Tennis[edit]

In the late 1980s and early 1990s, Bhargav Sri Prakash was the top-ranked junior tennis player in India.[44] He also played in international tournaments representing India and had an International Tennis Federation world ranking of 761.[43] The All India Tennis Association awarded him a scholarship to be trained by coaches from the Harry Hopman Tennis Academy. He was a recipient of an award from the Ramanathan Krishnan Endowment Fund in 1988, to support his training overseas, as matchplay and international exposure have always been a challenge for athletes from the subcontinent. His game relied heavily on a strong serve and volley style of play, while he had a formidable forehand and a single hand backhand. In 1988, he won a national ranking tournament hosted by the state of Tamil Nadu for juniors on clay, by beating the top-seeded player who was several years older than him. He was awarded the Best Sportsman Award by the tournament director - Mr Parthasarathy - for his sportsmanly conduct, grit, self-restraint and mental strength, during an episode when he was down two championship points in the second set, being a set down in the match. Despite a highly questionable line call overrule by the chair umpire and the crowd urging him to question the call, when the set score was 1-5, he went back to the baseline to continue the game and was able to save the two points matchpoints. He went on to win the game, as well as the next two sets, to win the Championship.[47]

He played in the number one singles position, as well as doubles and captained the Anna University team to win the South Zone Collegiate Championship in Chidambaram, after which he led the team to reach the finals in the Annual Intervarsity Championships in New Delhi, in 1997.[48]

In 1999, he won the Men's Singles Championship held by the Tennis Club of the University of Michigan, although he did not have eligibility to play NCAA at the Varsity level, given his status as an international graduate student.

During a keynote he gave to students including aspiring entrepreneurs at the 2020 Business Conclave at the Shri Ram College of Commerce, he said "the best training I ever received for becoming an entrepreneur, were the lessons from playing competitive tennis. There is no better school to teach the merits of intrinsically motivated discipline, boundless patience for delaying gratification, respect for your coaches and support team, motivation to win by pursuing a dream and the practice of mental resilience in dealing with failure."[49] He also spoke about the origin of his interest in health, nutrition and fitness, from his formative experiences as an athlete.[50]

Education[edit]

School

He attended the Sishya School from kindergarten through middle school and was the youngest child in his class, who struggled with balancing academics and traveling for tennis. He had a gift for Math, Science and outperformed academically despite missing classes and exams due to long periods of travel for tournaments.[51] He finished high school from Vidya Mandir Senior Secondary School where he chose a pre-med track with specialization in Biology. He had a talent for theater and was chosen to play the lead role of “Maxim” in Rebecca during his high school Annual Day Show.

Undergraduate Degree

He enrolled in the Birla Institute of Technology and Science but dropped out in his first semester and returned to Chennai, to continue to play competitive tennis.[52] He gained an undergraduate degree in Mechanical Engineering from the College of Engineering, Guindy.[53][54] He was an automobile racing enthusiast and the charter secretary responsible for the institution of the Society of Automotive Engineers Student Chapter of Anna University.[55] His innovation in an elecotromagnetic collision avoidance system as part of his senior year project won Awards and was granted a patent in India, when he was 19 years old.[56]

Graduate Studies

He went on to attend graduate school on a full academic research fellowship from Dennis Assanis at the University of Michigan where he worked on thermodynamics, computational fluid dynamics and experimental tribology at the Walter E Lay Automotive Lab[57] in Ann Arbor. His master's thesis and capstone was funded by ExxonMobil and was about innovative methods to use spark timing controls and algorithmic automation to lower cold start friction decay and emissions in gasoline engines. He graduated with a master's degree in Automotive Engineering in 2000.[58][59]

Career[edit]

File:Digital Vaccines by Sri Prakash - Lecture at Stanford School of Medicine.png
Inventor of Digital Vaccines gives a lecture during the 2017 Stanford MedicineX at Stanford School of Medicine, a leading academic conference for breakthroughs of technology in medicine
File:Bhargav Sri Prakash 2021 Biotech Planet Keynote.png
Digital Vaccines keynote at 2021 Biotech Planet Lisbon, Portugal
File:Bhargav Sri Prakash 2020 Frontiers Health.png
Delivering the keynote address in Berlin 2020 Frontiers Health Annual Conference
Opening keynote session & panel "Future of Healthcare & Technology" 2020 NTLF, Mumbai NASSCOM Technology Leadership Forum
File:University of Michigan Vmerse.jpg
University of Michigan Vmerse
File:Bhargav Sri Prakash CNBC interview.png
FriendsLearn Founder interview on CNBC about fooya and digital vaccines

FriendsLearn[edit]

Bhargav Sri Prakash is the Founder and serves as the CEO and Chief of Product at FriendsLearn, which he started in 2011, as a Fellow of the Kauffman Foundation. FriendsLearn is the research translation and innovation partner of Carnegie Mellon University Digital Vaccine Project and has pioneered non invasive needleless vaccine technology based on a neurocognitive computing and physiological modulation metaverse platform aimed at pediatric populations,[60] to prevent metabolic diseases and infectious diseases[61]

Lawsuits and intellectual property legal case[edit]

In 2016, an intellectual property and trademark dispute began between FriendsLearn and Moderna Therapeutics around digital vaccines[62] leading to a landmark settlement for the field in 2019.

David vs Goliath[edit]

Media reports described the situation as a classic case of 'David vs Goliath' and as a clash between "big business interest" and the "process of scientific inquiry for societal good".[63] Through legal representation led by Phil Malone of Stanford Law School and with backing of researchers from Carnegie Mellon University, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Duke University School of Medicine, UPMC Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh, along with executives from pharma major Glaxo Smith Kline, a full coexistence settlement was won by Sri Prakash's team of researchers and FriendsLearn, to further clinical research and commercialize its platform of digital vaccines.[64][65]

CADcorporation[edit]

He started his first company, CADcorporation, in the year 1999, when he was enrolled as an international graduate student at the University of Michigan to commercialize his graduate research in math-based computational fluid dynamics and thermodynamics simulations for design optimization of automotive powertrain systems. The company was incubated by the eLab at the Ross School of Business and emerged from a business school entrepreneurship class taught by Prof Joshua Coval called - Idea to IPO in 14 Weeks[66] He is the inventor of an algorithmic control methodology, now owned by General Motors Corporation, which is used in drive by wire propulsion systems of almost all cars and trucks.[67]

Vmerse[edit]

After selling CADcorporation, he founded Vmerse in 2005, which developed the world's first[68] gamified 3D consumer facing virtual reality real time simulation platform for college recruiting and alumni relations.[69] The University of Michigan described the Vmerse metaverse as "a revolutionary tools that will allow you to explore campus with work boots, learn about U-M and meet other students from the comfort of your home."[70] Vmerse developed a multiplayer and real time networked virtual reality and gamified experience for prospective students to experience the University campus, in an effort to lower barriers of access to underprivileged minority applicants, in response to the decision of the U.S. Supreme Court on the landmark case on affirmative action (Grutter v. Bollinger and Gratz v. Bollinger), to make the University of Michigan campus more accessible to underprivileged minority prospective applicants. The Vmerse metaverse was an immersive fully interactive 3D replica based on advances in photogrammetry, computer stereo vision and real time graphics, with integrated videos, application forms, chat bots, avatars, scheduled spectating, candidate assessment.[71] It was expanded as a platform for fundraising, alumni relations and emergency response training at Stanford University, Louisiana State University, Iowa State University, Western Illinois University, Columbia University, etc.[40][72] He sold Vmerse in 2009. He holds a US patent "System and Method of Using Virtual Environments"[73]

Nirmana Investments[edit]

In 2008 he co founded a global macro and quant trading fund that invested in real estate backed securities called Nirmana Investments – and served as a managing director.[42]

Kauffman Fellowship[edit]

Based on his experience in the field of education technology with Vmerse, he was invited to serve as an entrepreneur fellow of the Kauffman Foundation in 2011, to incubate entrepreneurial models for planetary impact that can address education, health issues, and agriculture. During this time he developed the vision for digital vaccines and founded FriendsLearn.[74][75][76]

US Department of State[edit]

In recognition of his unique expertise in gamification, virtual reality, artificial intelligence and college recruiting, with Vmerse, and also because he was an example of exemplary student immigrant innovators and entrepreneurs in the United States of America, the US Department of State's EducationUSA awarded his startup company a contract to design and develop the world's first gamified simulation to recruit prospective international students from around the globe. This framework - "Your 5 Steps to US Study" - was launched for distribution via DVD-Rom in 2011 and then as downloadable App via facebook in 2012. It is currently installed at libraries in US Consulates around the world. Since 2011, 'Your 5 Steps to US Study' has served more than 1 Billion users globally.[77][33]

Philanthropy[edit]

Reciprocity Foundation is a registered charitable trust and NGO where Bhargav Sri Prakash serves as a Trustee. The foundation was started by Sheila Sri Prakash and funds philanthropic projects related to holistic sustainability and reciprocity.[78]

Awards and honors[edit]

Year Name Awarding organization References
2020 Digital Disruptor NASSCOM [79][80]
2019 Top breakthrough in technology Carnegie Mellon University - Year in Review [81][82]
2016 Design Thinking in Healthcare Award Stanford School of Medicine MedicineX [83]
2016 Innovation Award EAT Forum (Stockholm, Sweden) [84]
2012 Academic Gaming Solution Award EdTech Digest (USA) [85]
2011 Kauffman Education Ventures Fellow Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation (USA) [86]

See also[edit]

  • List of Indian entrepreneurs
  • List of University of Michigan alumni
  • List of Inventors

Selected works[edit]

Articles

  • Kato-Lin, Yi-Chin; Padman, Rema; Sri Prakash, B (2020). "Impact of Pediatric Mobile Game Play on Healthy Eating Behavior: Randomized Controlled Trial". JMIR mHealth uHealth. 8 (11): 354–369. doi:10.2196/15717. PMC 7710449 Check |pmc= value (help). PMID 33206054 Check |pmid= value (help).
  • Padman, Rema; Sri Prakash, Bhargav (2017). "An Exploratory Analysis of Game Telemetry from a Pediatric mHealth Intervention". MEDINFO 2017: Precision Healthcare Through Informatics. 245 (2017): 183–187. doi:10.3233/978-1-61499-830-3-183. PMC 7710449 Check |pmc= value (help). PMID 29295078.
  • Padman R; Kato-Lin Y; Sri Prakash B; Gupta S; Narang P; Karthikeyan P; Bharath-Kumar U; Krishnatray P; Agnihotri S (17 September 2018). "Mobile Game–Based Digital Vaccine for Reducing Risk of Lifestyle Diseases". Journal of Medical Internet Research CHC 18 IProc Pre-print. 4 (2): e11790. doi:10.2196/11790. Unknown parameter |s2cid= ignored (help)

Books

  • Sri Prakash, Bhargav (November 2020). School health programme: a new model for COVID-19 Response. Azim Premji Foundation : Learning Curve. ISSN 2582-1644. Search this book on Amazon.com Logo.png

General Sources[edit]

  • Gupta, Deepti (June 2016). Escalation of Entrepreneurship in Assorted Segments in Indian Market. International Refereed Journal of Reviews and Research. ISSN 2348-2001. Search this book on Amazon.com Logo.png

[87]

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External links[edit]

Media related to [[commons:Lua error in Module:WikidataIB at line 466: attempt to index field 'wikibase' (a nil value).|Lua error in Module:WikidataIB at line 466: attempt to index field 'wikibase' (a nil value).]] at Wikimedia Commons


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