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Built Robotics, Inc.

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Built Robotics, Inc.
Built Wordmark.svg
Type
Private
ISIN🆔
IndustryRobotics
Founded 📆2016
Founders 👔Noah Ready-Campbell, Andrew Liang
Headquarters 🏙️,
San Francisco, California
Area served 🗺️
Products 📟 Fully autonomous construction equipment
Members
Number of employees
11-50 employees
🌐 Websitebuiltrobotics.com
📇 Address
📞 telephone

Built Robotics Inc. is a venture-backed startup that makes autonomous, self-driving construction equipment. It has raised $48 million in Series A and Series B funding from Next47, NEA, Founders Fund, Building Ventures, Presidio Ventures, Lemnos, and other investors.[1] [2] The technology developed by Built has been deployed on job sites in the US. Built Robotics was founded in San Francisco, California, by Noah Ready-Campbell and Andrew Liang in 2016.[3]

The company develops AI guidance systems to transform heavy equipment into autonomous robots. The technology combines sensors such as GPS, cameras, and lidar with software that is bundled into a hardware system. The system can be installed on most construction equipment to enable autonomy.[4][5]. The company launched into excavation and grading as its first business area.[6][7]

History[edit]

Built Robotics was established in San Francisco, California, in 2016. Ready-Campbell previously worked at Google and founded another startup, Twice. Liang previously worked at Airware and NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

In 2017, the company’s first autonomous vehicle, the ATL-74R, was used on a construction site for a community garden in Middletown, California.[8] The vehicle ran autonomously with oversight from a team on-premise.

In 2018, the technology was developed to work on larger heavy equipment including excavators and bulldozers.[9] The company manufactures an equipment kit or “guidance system” that is retrofitted onto a vehicle.[10] This system takes control of the vehicle to enable it to run autonomously.

Products and Services[edit]

The ATL-74R is the first autonomous construction vehicle from Built Robotics.

Built Robotics develops software and retrofits existing construction equipment to work as autonomous vehicles. A variety of manufacturers’ equipment may be used.[11] The company launched into excavation and grading as its first business area.[12]

On the construction site, a geofences is created using GPS points that are logged into the robot software. The autonomous robot cannot operate outside this geofence. Tasks like grading, excavating, or trenching are assigned to it by a remote operator that inputs data and boundary information into a software tool. There is no operator inside the vehicle when it is running autonomously.[13] On board the vehicles, LIDAR and GPS work with four-dimensional maps uploaded to the machines to excavate the land according to the construction drawings and given task.[14]

The software employs pedestrian detection to avoid object collision. A hardware emergency stop or “kill switch” allows on-site operators to kill machine operation both on the machine and remotely.

Fundraising History[edit]

In October 2017, Built Robotics raised a $15 million Series A led by New Enterprise Associates.[15]

In September 2019, Built Robotics raised a $33 million Series B led by Next47.[16]

References[edit]

  1. Gershgorn, Dave (October 19, 2017). "Construction is as far from a Silicon Valley darling as you can get—and that's why it's ready for automation". Quartz. Uzabase. Retrieved 21 November 2018.
  2. Ferguson, Mike (April 25, 2018). "Look Ma! No driver. The future of construction work may be robotic". Billings Gazette. Billings Gazette. Retrieved 21 November 2018.
  3. "Built Robotics". Crunchbase. Crunchbase Inc. Retrieved 21 November 2018.
  4. Nichols, Greg (February 27, 2019). "Retrofit: The $15.5 trillion industry undergoing a robotic remodel". ZD Net. CBS Interactive. Retrieved 19 September 2019.
  5. Hawkins, Andrew (October 19, 2017). "Watch this autonomous bulldozer excavate dirt without a human operator". The Verge. Vox Media, Inc. Retrieved 21 November 2018.
  6. Chea, Terence (March 18, 2018). "Robots break new ground in construction industry". Associated Press. Associated Press. Retrieved 19 September 2019.
  7. Kendall, Marisa (April 22, 2018). "Could this new tech help us build more houses?". The Mercury News. Bay Area News Group. Retrieved 21 November 2018.
  8. McSweeney, Kelly (October 24, 2017). "Autonomous construction equipment is here". ZDNet. CBS Interactive. Retrieved 21 November 2018.
  9. Johnsonl, Khari (September 19, 2019). "Built Robotics raises $33 million for automated construction equipment". VentureBeat. VentureBeat. Retrieved 19 September 2019.
  10. McSweeney, Kelly (September 19, 2019). "Robotic excavators get a boost with $33 million for Built Robotics". ZD Net. CBS Interactive. Retrieved 19 September 2019.
  11. Levy, Ari (October 19, 2017). "This ex-Googler is bringing self-driving excavators to construction sites". CNBC. CNBC LLC. Retrieved 21 November 2018.
  12. Gershgorn, Dave (October 19, 2017). "Construction is as far from a Silicon Valley darling as you can get—and that's why it's ready for automation". Quartz. Uzabase. Retrieved 21 November 2018.
  13. Grayson, Wayne` (December 19, 2017). "Autonomous Track Loader performs low-level excavation, grading tasks to boost jobsite productivity". Equipment World. Randall-Reilly, LLC. Retrieved 21 November 2018.
  14. Hawkins, Andrew (October 19, 2017). "Watch this autonomous bulldozer excavate dirt without a human operator". The Verge. Vox Media, Inc. Retrieved 21 November 2018.
  15. "Built Robotics' massive construction excavator drives itself". TechCrunch. Retrieved September 19, 2019.
  16. "Built Robotics raises $33M for its self-driving construction equipment". TechCrunch. Retrieved September 19, 2019.

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]

New Proposed Article for Robotics Company in San Francisco[edit]

This article "Built Robotics" is from Wikipedia. The list of its authors can be seen in its historical and/or the page Edithistory:Built Robotics. Articles copied from Draft Namespace on Wikipedia could be seen on the Draft Namespace of Wikipedia and not main one.