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Jake Paul

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Jake Paul
Jake Paul 2019.jpg Jake Paul 2019.jpg
Paul in June 2019
BornJake Joseph Paul
(1997-01-17) January 17, 1997 (age 24)
Cleveland, Ohio, U.S.[1][2]
🏳️ NationalityAmerican
💼 Occupation
YouTuber, actor, social media influencer, entrepreneur, rapper, professional boxer
📆 Years active  2013–present
🤑 Net worth$11.5 million[3]
👪 RelativesLogan Paul (brother)

Jake Joseph Paul (born January 17, 1997)[1] is an American YouTuber, internet personality, actor, rapper, and professional boxer. He initially rose to fame on the now-defunct video application Vine,[6] before playing the role of Dirk Mann on the Disney Channel series Bizaardvark for two seasons.[7]

Throughout his career, Paul has become the subject of many controversies due to his behavior including engaging in risky stunts and featuring age-inappropriate material for YouTube content, getting fired from his Disney television show Bizaardvark, and being charged with criminal trespass and unlawful assembly.[3][8]

Early life and career[edit]

Jake Paul was born on January 17, 1997, in Cleveland,[1][2] and grew up in Westlake, Ohio, with his older brother Logan, who is also a YouTuber and internet personality. He is the son of Pamela Ann Stepnick (née Meredith) and realtor Gregory Allan Paul.[9] Paul began his career in September 2013 posting videos on Vine. By the time Vine was discontinued, Paul had amassed 5.3 million followers and 2 billion views on the app.[10]

Career[edit]

2017–2018: Team 10[edit]

Jake Paul at Web Summit in 2016

On May 15, 2014, Jake Paul uploaded his first video to YouTube, titled "Jake Paul Daily Vlogs".[11] On January 17, 2017, which was Paul's 20th birthday, it was reported he had launched an entertainment collaborative, titled Team 10, with $1 million in financing to create influencer marketing management and creative agency around teen entertainment.[12] Investors include Danhua Capital, Horizons Alpha, Vayner Capital, Sound Ventures & A-Grade Investments, and Adam Zeplain.[13]

Paul released the single titled "It's Everyday Bro", featuring Team 10, alongside the music video, on May 30, 2017. It featured vocals from members of the team at the time, consisting of Nick Crompton, Chance Sutton, Ivan and Emilio Martinez, and Tessa Brooks. The video accumulated over 70 million views in one month, and became the third most disliked video on the website. The song debuted and peaked at number 91 on the Billboard Hot 100 and was certified platinum by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA). Its title refers to how Paul at the time posted a video every single day.[14] On June 17, Paul released the single Ohio Fried Chicken, featuring now-former Team 10 members Chance Sutton and Anthony Trujillo, alongside the music video. Following the song, he released a single Jerika with Erika Costell, his then-girlfriend, featuring now-former Team 10 member Uncle Kade, on July 12. However, he deleted the song from streaming services after his breakup with Costell in 2018. On August 5, 2017, Paul released a new single titled That Ain't on the News, alongside the music video. On October 25, Paul released a single titled No Competition with now-former Team 10 member Dynamite Dylan, along with the music video. However, the latter deleted it from streaming services more than a year later. On November 11, Paul released the single Saturday Night, featuring now-former Team 10 members Chad Tepper and Nick Crompton. Eleven days later, on November 22, Paul released a remix of It's Everyday Bro, featuring American rapper Gucci Mane in place of Team 10, alongside the new music video for it. On December 1, he released an extended play titled 'Litmas' with Team 10 for Christmas, but however, he deleted it from streaming services a little less than a year later.

On April 27, 2018, Paul released the single Malibu with now-former Team 10 member Chad Tepper, along with the music video. On May 11, he released another single titled My Teachers, featuring now-former Team 10 members Sunny Malouf and Anthony Trujillo, along with the music video. On May 24, he released two singles, Randy Savage and Cartier Vision. The former song features Team 10 and hip-hop duo Jitt & Quan, featuring vocals from Team 10 members at the time, consisting of Anthony Trujillo, Sunny Malouf, Justin Roberts, Erika Costell, and Chad Tepper; it was released along with the music video. The latter song features Anthony and the duo as well; the music video was released later on September 12. On August 15, Paul released another single titled Champion, featuring the duo, along with the music video. The song was a diss track towards Paul's boxing opponent Deji Olatunji (ComedyShortsGamer), the younger brother of British YouTube star, internet personality, boxer, and rapper KSI, in which their fight happened ten days later on August 25. Throughout the summer of 2018, Paul and Team 10 went on a tour within the United States, performing songs. Gradually, the Team 10 members all left one by one from the beginning of the year until the end.

2019: Business enterprises and new group[edit]

On March 1, 2019, Paul released the single "I'm Single", which was released along with the music video. The song focused on Paul's feelings about being single and his breakup with Erika Costell. On July 12, it was reported that Paul had started a new group after Team 10 had disbanded. The group consisted of Adam Quinn, Lauren Dascalo, Brandon Amato, and Payton and Mikahl Caci. On December 13, 2019, Paul released another single "These Days", but deleted it from streaming services less than a year later.

2020–present: More focus on music[edit]

On July 24, 2020, Paul released the single "Fresh Outta London", which was released alongside the music video.[15] For the video shoot, he threw a party at his home in Calabasas, California thirteen days before, on July 11, in which he garnered national attention after being called out by Calabasas mayor Alicia Weintraub after videos and pictures of the party surfaced online. On September 10, Paul released another single titled "23", alongside a music video at his house, which only starred his older brother Logan and also featured clips of him and a few of his friends. The title of the song refers to his age at the time, as well as American former basketball player Michael Jordan's jersey number. On October 15, Paul released the single "Dummy", featuring Canadian rapper TVGucci, who is signed to fellow Canadian rapper Drake's record label, OVO Sound. The lyric video was published to Paul's YouTube channel six days later, on October 21.

Controversies[edit]

In late 2015, it was announced that Jake Paul would be starring as Dirk in Disney Channel's new comedy series, Bizaardvark.[7] On July 22, 2017, during the middle of filming the second season of Bizaardvark, the Disney Channel announced that Paul would be leaving the series, saying in a statement "We've mutually agreed that Jake Paul will leave his role on the Disney Channel series Bizaardvark. On behalf of the production company, the cast and crew, we thank Jake for his good work on the TV series for the past 18 months and extend our best wishes to him."[16] The announcement followed a news report from KTLA[17] about public complaints from Paul's neighbors regarding the noise generated by Paul's pranks, parties, fire hazards and the large crowds of Paul's fans congregating in their neighborhood.[18][19][20] Paul later confirmed the news on his Twitter page, saying he would now focus more on his personal brand, his YouTube channel, his business ventures, and more adult acting roles.[16] Paul later revealed in an interview with The Hollywood Reporter that he was actually fired from Bizaardvark by Disney who wanted to expedite the process of weaning him off the show due to the KTLA segment.[21]

On July 18, 2017, it was reported that Paul's neighbors in the Beverly Grove neighborhood of Los Angeles were meeting with city council members and police officials about filing a class-action public nuisance lawsuit against Paul.[22] This came after Paul made his home address public,[22][23][20] leading crowds of fans to gather outside Paul's residence, and noise complaints by neighbors.[23][17][24][25] On April 24, 2018, it was reported that Paul was being sued by Cobra Acquisitions, the company that owns the house, for $2.5 million.[26]

On January 3, 2018, Paul uploaded a video to his YouTube channel titled "I lost my virginity" which used a thumbnail of himself and his then-girlfriend Erika Costell posing semi-nude on top of each other. The video was age-restricted by YouTube as a result, and critics such as Keemstar criticized the thumbnail as being inappropriate for his younger audience. The thumbnail was later changed with both Paul and Costell fully clothed and not touching each other.[27] Two days later, on January 5, TMZ revealed a video in which Paul used the racial epithet "nigga" multiple times while freestyle rapping.[28]

On January 3, 2018, Paul started the website Edfluence, a program that focused to teach younger people how to be successful and earn money online. He explained the reason he created the course, writing on Twitter, "Basically i'm [sic] sick of our education system and how it's teaching kids 0 real life skills for them to secure there [sic] own future." He continued, "I'm creating a movement for everyone who wants to take life into their own hands and learn real life skills from actual professionals." The course cost seven United States dollars per user, which would allow the user to unlock a series of videos for a "roadmap" to success as an influencer. However, the seven dollars did not unlock the entire program, but only gave a few basic tips. Paul also promised his audience that if they joined the course, they would get to join "Team 1000", which did not happen. Following the situation, Paul was accused of scamming young followers and stealing their money. Later, on January 31, 2020, Edfluence was shut down, which stopped the course permanently.[29] On February 15, Paul announced that he would partner with Los Angeles-based brand development group GenZ Holdings Inc. to create a $19.99 per month platform aimed at teaching children how to build an online presence.[30] "The Financial Freedom Movement" promises to give subscribers access to “Jake Paul’s personal experience, rituals and secret formula” and “cutting edge mentorship, coaching, and training”.[31] The program has been criticized by some, with one interviewer questioning whether it would send a dangerous message to his young fanbase.[31] YouTuber h3h3productions went further, calling the platform a "scam",[32] and BuzzFeed News reporter Lauren Strapagiel described the service as "deeply underwhelming".[33]

On January 3, 2019, Jake Paul, along with fellow YouTuber RiceGum, came under fire for promoting MysteryBrand, a website which offers the chance to open a digital "mystery box" of pre-selected items with a promise to win one in real life at random. Many users have said they have not received prizes they won through the site.[34]

On February 23, 2020, in Las Vegas, Nevada, Paul was involved in an altercation with British singer Zayn Malik at Westgate, the hotel at which the two were staying. They stayed at the hotel since they both separately went to the MGM Grand Garden Arena to watch a boxing match, the rematch between American boxer Deontay Wilder and British boxer Tyson Fury, which occurred the day before. Paul and Malik's rooms were right across from each other. Paul's older brother, Logan, went to Paul's hotel room. At the hotel, Paul attempted to talk to Malik, and Malik reportedly responded in a rude tone, which upset Paul. Following the interaction, Paul posted about it on Twitter, writing, "almost had to clap up zane from 1 direction since he is a little guy and basically told me to fuck off for no reason when i was being nice to him.... zane ik you're reading this... stop being angry cause u came home alone to ur big ass hotel room hahaha". In another tweet, Paul wrote, "bro he literally started yelling and freaking the fuck out. 'you wanna test me mate?' lol I feel bad for childhood stars". He then told his brother Logan that he had run into Malik outside, explaining that Malik was not talking in a nice tone and turned him away. Logan then went to Malik's hotel room, and claimed to hear him screaming; Logan was shown away by a lady in Malik's room. Paul was recording Logan's interaction with Malik on camera. Malik's girlfriend, American model Gigi Hadid, replied back to Paul's first tweet, writing, "Lol cause he doesn't care to hang w you and your embarrassing crew of YouTube groupies ..? Home alone with his best friends like a respectful king cause he has me, sweetie. Unbothered by your irrelevant ugly ass. Go to bed ..." Paul later deleted his tweets which criticized Malik and then posted another tweet stating that he tweeted about the incident since he was drunk, acknowledging the fact in a tweet later in the day, writing, "someone needs to take my phone when i'm drunk because I am a fucking idiot".[35] Logan released the video footage on the 161st episode of his podcast, Impaulsive, in which he explained the whole situation.[36]

On May 30, 2020, Paul and a few of his friends came to have dinner at P. F. Chang's outside of Scottsdale Fashion Square in Scottsdale, Arizona, as part of the George Floyd protests, where it escalated quickly and people began looting the mall. Multiple instances of footage show Paul and his friends outside of a P. F. Chang's witnessing the riot and they made their way inside the mall where they documented the incident. People on social media criticized Paul for entering the mall and standing in the middle of the mall witnessing people looting stores.[37][38][39] Paul later apologized on social media condemning the violence, and also denied the accusations of looting, instead saying he was filming as a public service for a future video. Paul said, "We filmed everything we saw in an effort to share our experience and bring more attention to the anger felt in every neighborhood we traveled through; we were strictly documenting, not engaging."[40] On June 4, 2020, Paul was charged with criminal trespass and unlawful assembly, both misdemeanor charges, for being in the mall during the riot.[41] On August 5, 2020, Paul's Calabasas mansion was raided by the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI). In a statement to the Los Angeles Times the FBI stated, "The FBI is executing a federal search warrant at a residence in Calabasas in connection with an ongoing investigation. The affidavit in support of the search warrant has been sealed by a judge and I am, therefore, prohibited from commenting as to the nature of the investigation." On the same day, the charges were dismissed without prejudice, the Scottsdale Police Department said it was "in the best interest of the community" and would allow a federal criminal investigation to be completed.[42] Paul also explained in a now-deleted video that the raid was "completely related to the looting controversy".[43]

On July 11, 2020, Paul threw a large party at his home in Calabasas, California, despite the COVID-19 pandemic, which was going on at the time. Dozens of people attended without wearing masks and maintaining social distancing. After complaints from neighbors and videos surfaced on social media, Calabasas mayor Alicia Weintraub expressed outrage, saying, "They're having this large party, no social distancing, no masks, it’s just a big huge disregard for everything that everybody is trying to do to get things back to functioning." She continued, saying, "It's really just a party acting like COVID does not exist, it's acting that businesses aren't closed".[44][45][46] She later added that the city was looking into "all of our options" regarding penalties for Paul and the attendees of the party.[47]

On November 25, 2020, Paul attracted further COVID-related controversy due to statements in an interview with The Daily Beast. When interviewer Marlow Stern asked Paul if he regretted his words and actions regarding the July 11 party, Paul responded by saying that COVID-19 was a "hoax", also stating that "98 percent of news [about COVID-19] is fake", and that he believed the measures against Covid-19 in the United States should end, calling them "the most detrimental thing to our society." He then incorrectly stated that the flu had killed as many people in the United States in 2020 as Coronavirus did, and claimed that "Medical professionals have [recently] also said that masks do absolutely nothing to prevent the spread of coronavirus"; he later referred to said professionals as "dozens of my medical friends." When Stern tried to question his claims, Paul told Stern "You're arrogant. You're very arrogant", "you want clickbait", and "I've never even heard of you."[48][49][50] The interview sparked condemnation from various individuals and media outlets, such as Page Six, and fellow YouTuber Tyler Oakley, who called Paul "aggressively ignorant" and "embarrassing."[49][51]

On 29 November 2020, Jake Paul sparked frustration after stating he paved the way for content house creation and boxing matches between high-profile social media stars. Many objected to Paul's claim, observing that he did not create the first content house, nor was he the first YouTube star to fight in a boxing match.[52]

On 15 December 2020, the four-time kickboxing world champion Andrew Tate called out Paul under boxing rules.[53][54] Tate, who is willing to come out of retirement, claimed $3 million offer to Paul.[55]

Boxing career[edit]

Paul vs. Deji[edit]

On February 24, 2018, it was announced that Paul and his brother would be fighting KSI and his younger brother, Deji, in two white-collar boxing matches.[56] Paul's fight against Deji was the chief undercard bout before their older brothers, KSI and Logan Paul, did battle in the main event. Paul won the fight via fifth-round technical knockout (TKO) after Deji's corner threw in the towel following a flurry of unanswered punches.[57]

Turning professional[edit]

Paul vs. AnEsonGib[edit]

On December 21, 2019, it was announced that Paul would be making his professional boxing debut against fellow YouTuber AnEsonGib (known as Gib) on January 30, 2020 in Miami.[58] The match between Paul and Gib was the co-feature to the match between professional boxers Demetrius Andrade and Luke Keeler.[58] Paul won the fight via TKO at 2:18 in the first round.[59]

Paul vs. Robinson[edit]

In July 2020, it was announced he would be venturing into the ring for a second professional bout, facing professional basketball player Nate Robinson as part of the undercard for the Mike Tyson vs. Roy Jones Jr. exhibition match. The event was initially scheduled for September 12 at the Dignity Health Sports Park in Carson, California,[60][61] however, in August, Tyson revealed the event had been pushed back to November 28 in order to maximize revenue.[62] Paul won the fight via KO at 1:24 in the second round.[63][64] After back-and-forth in social media,[65][66] it was announced on December 22, 2020 that Paul will be facing former Bellator MMA and ONE Welterweight Champion Ben Askren on March 28, 2021, in Los Angeles.[67][68] After Askren accepted Paul’s challenge, rumors of a proposed March 28 date in Los Angeles started circulating. As of December 29th, 2020, Askren says no advancement has been made, which makes the former titleholder think that the Cleveland native may no longer be interested.[69]

Personal life[edit]

Paul has English, Irish, Scottish, Welsh, Jewish and German ancestry.[70]

In November 2016, Paul started dating fellow American YouTuber and internet personality Alissa Violet. They broke up in February 2017.[71] In April 2018, Paul started dating American model Erika Costell.[72] The two broke up in November of that year.[73] Paul then started dating fellow American YouTuber and internet personality Tana Mongeau in April 2019. The two jokingly told that they were engaged and married, although not legally, in July 2019.[74] Paul and Mongeau broke up in January 2020.[75] Starting in January, Paul started dating American model Julia Rose.[76]

Professional boxing record[edit]

Professional record summary
2 fights 2 wins 0 losses
By knockout 2 0
No. Result Win Record Opponent Type Round, time Date Location Notes
2 Win 2–0 United States Nate Robinson KO 2 (6), 1:24 Nov 28, 2020 United States Staples Center, Los Angeles, California, U.S.[77]
1 Win 1–0 United Kingdom AnEsonGib TKO 1 (6), 2:18 Jan 30, 2020 United States The Meridian At Island Gardens, Miami, Florida, U.S.

Filmography[edit]

Film roles
Year Title Role Notes
2016 Dance Camp Lance
Mono Dugan Cameo
2019 Airplane Mode Himself
Television roles
Year Title Role Notes
2016–2018 Bizaardvark Dirk Mann Main role (seasons 1–2)
2016 The Monroes Conrad
Walk the Prank Himself Special guest
2017 The Price Is Right Special guest model
Online roles
Year Title Role Notes
2018 The Mind of Jake Paul Himself The main subject of the documentary

Discography[edit]

Extended plays[edit]

List of extended plays, with selected chart positions and details
Title EP details Peak chart positions
US
Heat
[78]
US
Ind
[79]
Litmas
(with Team 10)
  • Released: December 1, 2017[80]
  • Label: Self-released
  • Formats: Digital download, streaming
2 29

Singles[edit]

As lead artist[edit]

List of singles as a lead artist, with selected chart positions and certifications, showing year released and album name
Title Year Peak chart positions Certifications Album
US
[81]
CAN
[82]
SCO
[83]
UK Indie
[84]
"Shakey"[85]
(with Greg Cipes)
2015 Non-album singles
"It's Everyday Bro"
(featuring Team 10)
2017 91 56 42 25
"Ohio Fried Chicken"[87]
(featuring Chance Sutton and Anthony Trujillo)
"Jerika"[88]
(with Erika Costell featuring Uncle Kade)
86 76
"That Ain't on the News"[89]
"Jake Paulers"[90]
"No Competition"[91]
(with Dynamite Dylan)
"Saturday Night"[92]
(featuring Chad Tepper and Nick Crompton)
"It's Everyday Bro (Remix)"[93]
(featuring Gucci Mane)
"Malibu"[94]
(with Chad Tepper)
2018
"My Teachers"[95]
(featuring Sunny and AT3)
"Randy Savage"[96]
(featuring Team 10 and Jitt & Quan)
"Cartier Vision"[97]
(featuring AT3 and Jitt & Quan)
"Champion"[98]
(featuring Jitt & Quan)
"I'm Single"[99] 2019
"These Days"[100]
"Fresh Outta London"[101] 2020
"23"[102]
"Dummy"[103]
(featuring TVGucci)
"Park South Freestyle"[104]
"—" denotes a single that did not chart or was not released.

As featured artist[edit]

List of singles as a featured artist, showing year released and album name
Title Year Album
"Chitty Bang"[105]
(Erika Costell featuring Jake Paul)
2018 Non-album single

Accolades[edit]

Year Nominated work Award Category Result Ref.
2014 JakePaul (Vine) 6th Annual Shorty Awards Vineographer Award Nominated [106]
Comedian Award Nominated [106]
2017 Himself Radio Disney Music Awards Social Media Star Won [107]
JakePaulProductions (YouTube) Teen Choice Awards Choice Music Web Star Won [108]
Choice YouTuber Won [108]

Bibliography[edit]

  • Paul, Jake. You Gotta Want It, ISBN 978-1501139475 Search this book on Amazon.com Logo.png., Gallery Books 2016 (memoir)[109]

References[edit]

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 Jake Paul (December 31, 2016). Draw My Life – Jake Paul. YouTube. Event occurs at 0:46. Archived from the original on December 10, 2018. Retrieved August 13, 2017. My parents made it roughly in 1996. Nine months later I was born on January 17, 1997, in Cleveland, Ohio. My parents named me Jake Joseph Paul, and I was a savage from day one. Unknown parameter |url-status= ignored (help)
  2. 2.0 2.1 Dawidziak, Mark (June 18, 2016). "Cleveland native Jake Paul jumps from social media stardom to Disney Channel's 'Bizaardvark'". The Plain Dealer. Archived from the original on August 1, 2017. Retrieved July 30, 2017. Unknown parameter |url-status= ignored (help)
  3. 3.0 3.1 Leskin, Paige (January 10, 2020). "Jake Paul says he and his brother Logan are the 'big bad wolves' of YouTube that everyone wants to see fail". Business Insider. Archived from the original on June 27, 2020. Retrieved June 27, 2020. Unknown parameter |url-status= ignored (help)
  4. "Logan Paul explains why he wasn't surprised by Ray Diaz sexual assault charges". Dexerto.com. Archived from the original on October 28, 2020. Retrieved September 8, 2019. Unknown parameter |url-status= ignored (help)
  5. 5.0 5.1 5.2 5.3 "BoxRec: Jake Paul". BoxRec. Archived from the original on May 31, 2020. Retrieved May 31, 2020. Unknown parameter |url-status= ignored (help)
  6. Robehmed, Natalie. "How YouTube Star Jake Paul Went Viral". Forbes. Archived from the original on November 7, 2018. Retrieved November 6, 2018. Unknown parameter |url-status= ignored (help)
  7. 7.0 7.1 Kowalski, Kristine Hope (March 9, 2016). "Jake Paul joins Bizaardvark". Twist. Archived from the original on August 27, 2016. Retrieved July 7, 2016. Unknown parameter |url-status= ignored (help)
  8. Tenbarge, Kat (June 6, 2020). "Jake Paul tried to use looting for YouTube views, and is facing charges. These are all the ways the controversial star has stirred up outrage in the past". Business Insider. Archived from the original on October 28, 2020. Retrieved June 27, 2020. Unknown parameter |url-status= ignored (help)
  9. "Birth Record of Logan Alexander Paul". MooseRoots. Retrieved May 2, 2017.[permanent dead link]
  10. Shamsian, Jacob (July 20, 2017). "6 things to know about Jake Paul – the viral video star who's at war with his neighbors". Insider. Archived from the original on December 23, 2017. Retrieved July 21, 2017. Unknown parameter |url-status= ignored (help)
  11. "Archived copy". Archived from the original on May 15, 2014. Retrieved October 28, 2020. Unknown parameter |url-status= ignored (help)CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  12. Shieber, Jonathan (January 17, 2017). "Social media star Jake Paul raises $1 million to become a social media mogul". TechCrunch. Archived from the original on January 18, 2017. Retrieved January 18, 2017. Unknown parameter |url-status= ignored (help)
  13. Takahashi, Dean (January 17, 2017). "19-year-old raises $1 million for TeamDom to monetize influencers". VentureBeat. Archived from the original on January 18, 2017. Retrieved January 18, 2017. Unknown parameter |url-status= ignored (help)
  14. "The Hot 100". Billboard. June 24, 2017. Archived from the original on June 23, 2017. Retrieved June 25, 2017. Unknown parameter |url-status= ignored (help)
  15. "Archived copy". Archived from the original on October 17, 2020. Retrieved October 28, 2020. Unknown parameter |url-status= ignored (help)CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  16. 16.0 16.1 Knapp, JD (July 23, 2017). "Jake Paul Exits Disney Channel's 'Bizaardvark' Mid-Season". Variety. Archived from the original on July 24, 2017. Retrieved July 24, 2017. Unknown parameter |url-status= ignored (help)
  17. 17.0 17.1 Wolfe, Chris (July 17, 2017). "In Beverly Grove, Social Media Star Jake Paul’s Antics Stir Up The Neighborhood" Archived February 25, 2020, at the Wayback Machine. KTLA (Los Angeles).
  18. Wood, Lucy (July 24, 2017). "YouTuber Jake Paul axed by Disney after bragging about turning his neighbourhood into a 'war zone'" Archived June 26, 2019, at the Wayback Machine. Metro.
  19. Malone Kircher, Madison (July 24, 2017). "Disney Drops YouTuber Jake Paul Amid Neighborhood-Terrorizing Drama" Archived July 24, 2017, at the Wayback Machine. Select All.
  20. 20.0 20.1 Bradley, Laura (July 25, 2017). "Why Disney Just Severed Ties with a Famously Obnoxious YouTuber" Archived July 27, 2017, at the Wayback Machine. Vanity Fair.
  21. Abramovitch, Seth (August 24, 2017). "YouTube Star Jake Paul on Getting Fired by Disney, Feuding With Neighbors: "I Feel Like a Zoo Animal"". The Hollywood Reporter. Archived from the original on August 27, 2017. Retrieved August 27, 2017. Unknown parameter |url-status= ignored (help)
  22. 22.0 22.1 Lorenz, Taylor. "Social media star Jake Paul accused of turning LA neighborhood into a 'living hell' and 'war zone'". Mic. Archived from the original on July 21, 2017. Retrieved July 21, 2017. Unknown parameter |url-status= ignored (help)
  23. 23.0 23.1 Barragan, Bianca; Chandler, Jerry (July 24, 2017). "Social media ‘star’ Jake Paul renting $17K/month McMansion and driving neighbors mad" Archived July 4, 2020, at the Wayback Machine. Curbed.
  24. Bromwich, Jonah Engel (July 21, 2017). "Jake Paul, a Reality Villain for the YouTube Generation". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on July 21, 2017. Retrieved July 21, 2017. Unknown parameter |url-status= ignored (help)
  25. "Jake Paul Could Be Facing a Class Action Lawsuit In His Future". Express Newsline. July 21, 2017. Archived from the original on August 28, 2017. Retrieved July 21, 2017. Unknown parameter |url-status= ignored (help)
  26. Weiss, Geoff (April 24, 2018). "Jake Paul Hit With $2.5 Million Lawsuit From Former Landlord For Trashing Rental Home". Tubefilter. Archived from the original on June 16, 2020. Retrieved July 16, 2020. Unknown parameter |url-status= ignored (help)
  27. Alexander, Julia (January 5, 2018). "Logan Paul's brother Jake draws more negative attention to YouTube creators". Polygon. Archived from the original on January 6, 2018. Retrieved January 5, 2018. Unknown parameter |url-status= ignored (help)
  28. Lockett, Dee (January 5, 2018). "Not to Be Outdone by His Brother, Jake Paul Caught Dropping N-Word in Leaked Video". Vulture.com. Archived from the original on January 6, 2018. Retrieved January 5, 2018. Unknown parameter |url-status= ignored (help)
  29. Farokhmanesh, Megan (January 23, 2018). "Jake Paul's school for social media stars will teach you all the wrong lessons". The Verge. Archived from the original on January 23, 2018. Retrieved January 23, 2018. Unknown parameter |url-status= ignored (help)
  30. Cleo Yap, Audrey (February 16, 2020). "YouTuber Jake Paul Launches Entrepreneur How-To Platform, Financial Freedom Movement". Variety. Archived from the original on June 3, 2020. Retrieved July 16, 2020. Unknown parameter |url-status= ignored (help)
  31. 31.0 31.1 Hale, James. "Jake Paul Launches 'The Financial Freedom Movement,' A $19.99/Month Program For Kids To Become Influencers". Tube Filter. Archived from the original on March 7, 2020. Retrieved July 16, 2020. Unknown parameter |url-status= ignored (help)
  32. Klein, Ethan; Klein, Hila; Swerdlove, Dan. "H3 Podcast #176". YouTube. Archived from the original on March 4, 2020. Retrieved February 19, 2020. Unknown parameter |url-status= ignored (help)
  33. Strapagiel, Lauren. "I Tried Jake Paul's "Financial Freedom Movement" Classes And Please Save Your Money". BuzzFeed. Archived from the original on July 2, 2020. Retrieved February 19, 2020. Unknown parameter |url-status= ignored (help)
  34. Shamsian, Jacob (January 3, 2019). "Jake Paul and other influencers are promoting 'mystery boxes' to their young audiences. Critics say it's a scam". Insider. Archived from the original on January 4, 2019. Retrieved January 3, 2019. Unknown parameter |url-status= ignored (help)
  35. "Jake Paul Deletes Shady Zayn Malik Tweets And Apologises After Gigi Hadid Hit Back At YouTuber". Variety. 24 February 2020. Retrieved 24 February 2020.
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  37. "Jake Paul Responds to Being Seen in Middle of Arizona Mall Looting". TMZ. May 31, 2020. Archived from the original on May 31, 2020. Retrieved May 31, 2020. Unknown parameter |url-status= ignored (help)
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  42. "Archived copy". Archived from the original on October 18, 2020. Retrieved August 5, 2020. Unknown parameter |url-status= ignored (help)CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
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  44. Melugin, Bill (July 14, 2020). "Calabasas mayor outraged after YouTube star Jake Paul throws weekend mansion party". Fox 11 Los Angeles. Archived from the original on July 16, 2020. Retrieved July 16, 2020. Unknown parameter |url-status= ignored (help)
  45. Andrews, Travis M. (July 15, 2020). "YouTuber Jake Paul blasted by Calabasas mayor for throwing massive party 'acting like covid does not exist'". The Washington Post. Archived from the original on July 16, 2020. Retrieved July 16, 2020. Unknown parameter |url-status= ignored (help)
  46. Kirkpatrick, Emily (July 16, 2020). "Jake Paul Is in Trouble For Throwing a Huge Party". Vanity Fair. Archived from the original on July 16, 2020. Retrieved July 16, 2020. Unknown parameter |url-status= ignored (help)
  47. Torres, Ella (July 16, 2020). "YouTube star Jake Paul slammed by mayor over 'outrageous' party during COVID rise". ABC News. Archived from the original on July 16, 2020. Retrieved July 16, 2020. Unknown parameter |url-status= ignored (help)
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  49. 49.0 49.1 Bitsky, Leah (November 25, 2020). "Partying YouTuber Jake Paul thinks COVID-19 is a hoax". Page Six. Retrieved November 26, 2020.
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  61. "Tyson-Jones To Have Belt & Scoring: Badou Jack, Viddal Riley Added To Card". BoxingScene.com. July 25, 2020. Archived from the original on October 28, 2020. Retrieved August 11, 2020. Unknown parameter |url-status= ignored (help)
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  63. "Anger after Paul's knockout of Robinson". BBC Sport. Retrieved 2020-11-29.
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  65. Taylor, Tom (2020-12-02). "Ben Askren responds to Jake Paul challenge: "Muay Thai, kickboxing, boxing, Lethwei, name the style" | BJPenn.com". | BJPenn.com. Retrieved 2020-12-23.
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  72. "Jake Paul and 'Wife' Tana Mongeau Officially Break Up". Distractify. Archived from the original on March 27, 2020. Retrieved March 27, 2020. Unknown parameter |url-status= ignored (help)
  73. Curtin, Denise. "Youtuber Jake Paul announces split from Erika Costell with lengthy statement". her.ie. Archived from the original on November 8, 2018. Retrieved April 1, 2020. Unknown parameter |url-status= ignored (help)
  74. Dodgson, Lindsay. "Jake Paul and Tana Mongeau may not have had a license for their wild $500,000 Vegas wedding, and they haven't spent any time together since the ceremony". Insider. Archived from the original on October 28, 2020. Retrieved September 20, 2019. Unknown parameter |url-status= ignored (help)
  75. "Jake Paul and 'Wife' Tana Mongeau Officially Break Up". TMZ. Archived from the original on February 6, 2020. Retrieved January 31, 2020. Unknown parameter |url-status= ignored (help)
  76. "Jake Paul Says No Sex W/ GF Julia Rose Before Robinson Fight, 'She Hates Me'". TMZ.
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  86. "American certifications – Jake Paul". Recording Industry Association of America.
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  88. "Jerika (feat. Uncle Kade) – Single by Jake Paul & Erika Costell". iTunes Store (US). Archived from the original on January 31, 2018. Retrieved November 30, 2020. Unknown parameter |url-status= ignored (help)
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  93. "It's Everyday Bro (Remix) [feat. Gucci Mane] – Single by Jake Paul on iTunes". iTunes Store (US). Archived from the original on June 17, 2018. Retrieved June 18, 2018. Unknown parameter |url-status= ignored (help)
  94. "Malibu – Single by Chad Tepper & Jake Paul on iTunes". iTunes Store (US). Archived from the original on June 17, 2018. Retrieved June 18, 2018. Unknown parameter |url-status= ignored (help)
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  97. "Randy Savage (feat. AT3, Jitt, & Quan) – Single by Jake Paul on iTunes". iTunes Store (US). Archived from the original on June 17, 2018. Retrieved June 18, 2018. Unknown parameter |url-status= ignored (help)
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  100. "These Days – Single by Jake Paul on Apple Music". iTunes Store (US). Archived from the original on December 14, 2019. Retrieved December 13, 2019. Unknown parameter |url-status= ignored (help)
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  103. "DUMMY – Single by Jake Paul on Apple Music". iTunes Store (US). Archived from the original on October 28, 2020. Retrieved October 16, 2020. Unknown parameter |url-status= ignored (help)
  104. "Park South Freestyle - Single by Jake Paul". Apple Music. November 25, 2020. Retrieved November 30, 2020.
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  106. 106.0 106.1 FROM THE 6TH ANNUAL SHORTY AWARDS, JAKE PAUL. Finalist in COMEDIAN, VINEOGRAPHER Archived June 26, 2019, at the Wayback Machine. shortyawards.com. Retrieved November 7, 2017.
  107. Radio Disney Music Awards 2017 Winners: The Complete List Archived April 30, 2017, at the Wayback Machine. ENews. Published on April 30, 2017. Retrieved November 7, 2017.
  108. 108.0 108.1 Logan And Jake Paul Took Home 2 Teen Choice Awards Apiece Last Night Archived March 6, 2020, at the Wayback Machine. www.tubefilter.com. Published on August 14, 2017. Retrieved October 19, 2017.
  109. Paul, Jake (October 11, 2016). You Gotta Want It Hardcover – October 11, 2016. ISBN 978-1501139475. Search this book on Amazon.com Logo.png

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]


Other articles of the topic Biography : Ramón Núñez-Juárez, B. Gopalakrishnan, Carlos Ágreda, Fahd Hassan, Carmen Lozano Dumler, Robert Burr Smith, Blaine Anthony
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